Cut copper tub spout too short: nipple extension?

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Dan

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i have a delta tub faucet i'm installing.

i see other posts about this. i'm wondering if this product that slips inside the 1/2" copper pipe would work? it would restrict flow a bit but would it matter all that much? this sioux chief product


https://hdsupplysolutions.com/p/1-2...sion-nipple-adapter-kit-for-tub-spout-p845045


845045_K_Lg.jpg




current i have a 'slip' on adapter. should i purchase a threaded adapter + solder 1/2" pipe + solder on a threaded piece at the end?


delta slip-on tub spout adapter (one i have now):
https://www.deltafaucet.com/parts/product/RP33794.html

threaded tub spout adapter (should i buy this one?):
https://www.deltafaucet.com/parts/product/RP12307.html


references
https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/copper-pipe-too-short-to-install-tub-spout.40016/
 

Dan

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forgot to add the image of the copper for the tub spout: it's about 2 inches from the tiled wall

dan-tub-spout-1.jpg
 

Weekend Handyman

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I am not a plumber or pro. I would be worried about constriction. I have only done moen valves. On those ones you can not use pex down to the tub spout due to the smaller ID. If that fitting is going inside the copper pipe, I would think you could have similar problems with water coming out the shower head. I would give delta a call before using that product.
 
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Dan

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I am not a plumber or pro. I would be worried about constriction. I have only done moen valves. On those ones you can not use pex down due to the smaller ID. If that is going inside the copper, I would think you could have similar problems with water coming out the shower head. I would give delta a call before using that product.

Thanks. the restriction would be a short distance, unlike PEX where the restriction is all the way the length of the PEX tube.

I do understand there is this reduction of volume. I think the threaded adapter is likely the best route at this point
 

Dan

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You should be able to solder a regular coupler on, and avoid reducing the diameter.

https://terrylove.com/forums/index....t-with-diverter-1-2-copper-only-1-long.87219/

thanks for the reference.

i'm confused as to how a coupling is soldered on. for the adapter i have the hole through with the copper pipe goes is a very snug fit. i haven't tried yet but i imagine adding a straight coupling would be too bulky to fit inside the adapter.

i would then need to move the adapter closer to the end, making it too far from the wall for the tub spout to get to.

the other option is to cut even more of the stub to get the spout adapter closer to the finished wall
 

Reach4

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i'm confused as to how a coupling is soldered on. for the adapter i have the hole through with the copper pipe goes is a very snug fit. i haven't tried yet but i imagine adding a straight coupling would be too bulky to fit inside the adapter.
Based on the link I sent, I infer there is enough space.

You could take your adapter to the store. See that a nominal 1/2 inch copper coupling fits into adapter far enough. You will be soldering a piece of copper pipe to the coupling, and your set screw accepts that.
 
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Dan

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Based on the link I sent, I infer there is enough space.

You could take your adapter to the store. See that a nominal 1/2 inch copper coupling fits into adapter far enough. You will be soldering a piece of copper pipe to the coupling, and your set screw accepts that.

ok, yes, i will go try to fit it. if it fits then there isn't a problem i'll solder a union of two pipes and be on my way. only thing to worry about is the kerdi tub spout seal melting. but i can caulk/seal a different way.
 

Terry

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I have used their standard thread-on and/or sweat adapter, not the one with the set screw.

delta_tub_spout_a1.jpg


With these I can add a coupling which will fit inside the adapter and still make the joint on the end like in this picture.
I would have to have the set-screw one in hand to see how that would work in your situation.
 

Dan

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I have used their standard thread-on and/or sweat adapter, not the one with the set screw.

delta_tub_spout_a1.jpg


With these I can add a coupling which will fit inside the adapter and still make the joint on the end like in this picture.
I would have to have the set-screw one in hand to see how that would work in your situation.


unfortunately the 'slip-on' (i.e. 'set screw') version of the adapter doesn't have enough clearance for a straight coupling. i ordered the threaded adapter.

IMG_20210210_225757.jpg

once i receive the threaded version of the adapter i have a few options to choose from:

- solder on straight coupling + solder/tack the brass adapter to the copper pipe
- solder on threaded end for brass adapter
- cut back copper stub even more to allow for the tub spout to be able to be flush with the finished wall with the slip on adapter (since the coupling won't fit inside the slip-on adapter)
- get a different tub spout
- sell the house
- break up the tile and re-do the copper stub

since brass is a different material than copper, are there any tricks to 'tacking' the brass onto the copper pipe as shown above? seems this is the most straight forward approach. but i worry not sturdy, say i bump it with my leg. unless i have to fill the entire cavity with soldering material
 

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  • solder on straight coupling + solder/tack the brass adapter to the copper pipe
  • solder on threaded end for brass adapter
I think either of those. The RP12307 tub spout adapter measures 1.80" in length and 1.12" in diameter.

The corresponding actions are
  • Sweat onto 1/2" CWT - 1/4" to 1" from the wall to the adapter. I think you could cut the copper to length with a hacksaw after soldering.
  • Thread onto 1/2" IPS nipple or adapter - 5/8" to 1-5/8" from wall surface. I think that means how far the tip of the thread sticks out from the wall, but sanity check that when you get the adapter.
So for planning, aim for half way between the limits.
 
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Terry

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There is no problem with soldering the adapter to the copper. Done a bunch of times.

I have never tried soldering a male adapter near the wall though. I kind of hate soldering that close, but that could maybe work too.

delta-tub-spout-install.jpg
 
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Dan

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I think either of those. The RP12307 tub spout adapter measures 1.80" in length and 1.12" in diameter.

The corresponding actions are
  • Sweat onto 1/2" CWT - 1/4" to 1" from the wall to the adapter. I think you could cut the copper to length with a hacksaw after soldering.
  • Thread onto 1/2" IPS nipple or adapter - 5/8" to 1-5/8" from wall surface. I think that means how far the tip of the thread sticks out from the wall, but sanity check that when you get the adapter.
So for planning, aim for half way between the limits.

ok fantastic. well i think soldering a straight coupling + soldering on the adapter is most straight forward thing to do. and allows me to change things up if i mess up (not sure if there are wicks for plumbing like there is for smaller electronics, i could use my soldering wicks but that would be a lot of solder)
 

Dan

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There is no problem with soldering the adapter to the copper. Done a bunch of times.

I have never tried soldering a male adapter near the wall though. I kind of hate soldering that close, but that could maybe work too.

delta-tub-spout-install.jpg


thanks for the reference. i think i'll try C-4 if the adapter i purchased is the 'right' one. solder on a straight coupling + 1/2" copper pipe then solder on the spout adapter. i assume there needs to be a bunch of solder to make a 'solid' connection around the adapter and copper tube?
 

Terry

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I have done C-4 a bunch of times. Just a normal amount of solder and too much can allow it to drip down and prevent the spout from spinning on. Keep a rag handy to wipe it and remove the rubber O-ring while soldering.
 
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Reach4

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ok fantastic. well i think soldering a straight coupling + soldering on the adapter is most straight forward thing to do. and allows me to change things up if i mess up (not sure if there are wicks for plumbing like there is for smaller electronics, i could use my soldering wicks but that would be a lot of solder)
In plumbing, to unsolder, you apply heat and tension. Then shake or wipe off the excess solder.

Circuit boards are more delicate than copper pipes and fittings.
 

Jadnashua

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Brass solders just like copper, but keep in mind, that brass tub adapter is fairly massive, so it will take some time for it to heat up enough to solder. For plumbing, my preferred flux is one with powered solder in it (called tinning flux). Once you see that starting to melt, it's time to add the solder to finish up the joint. Otherwise, unless you do this frequently, it's easy to overheat the joint and burn out the flux, potentially, leading to a leaking connection.
 

Reach4

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If you solder, remove the o-ring while soldering.
 

Dan

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If you solder, remove the o-ring while soldering.

ended up cutting out the pipe, reconnecting with push-to-fit and worked out all good with the original delta spout adapter. so i still had to modify but instead of soldering the tub spout adapter i cut the down pipe from the mixer to the spout from the access door behind.
 
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