Remove shower drain clamping ring

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Jrichardson30

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DIY Guy remodeling my master bath. Planned to do everything except the shower mortar bed bc it just seemed too tricky. SO...I had some not-so-great tile guys build the mud bed for my shower. They installed drain, pan liner and did the mud bed. They messed it up, isn’t level and not sloped properly. After much research I decided to pull the bed up and redo myself. I’ve removed the mortar bed and pan is intact. But the weep holes are filled with silicone. So my question is, can I loosen the clamp ring, remove, clean holes and then reseal it to pan? I have tried cleaning holes but I can’t get silicone out of them. I haven’t loosened the clamp ring for fear of messing up the pan. Can I remove and reseat/reseal so that I know my shower pan system will work with the traditional mud bed? Also, the linear drain I have has a rubber gasket that goes between clamp ring and drain base. It appears that it would block weep holes from bottom. But maybe this is just the way it’s designed. I have included a photo of the diagram that came w the drain. Any advice would be appreciated. I was going to try and float the slope w thinset but thanks to the advice on this forum, I realized doing the whole Mud bed over was the best option. So thanks for that advice!
 

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WorthFlorida

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To have some pitch to the drain is important but the final slope is done with the thinset and tile. From the picture it doesn't look all that bad. If the curbing isn't quite level, again the thinset and tile sets up the finale level. At the curb you want a slight slope toward the pan but not too much were a shower door wouldn't sweep right.

https://terrylove.com/forums/index....-shower-tile-material-tips.88148/#post-632273
 

jadnashua

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Since you're doing this over, why not do it correctly?

When doing a conventional shower, you CANNOT put the liner on the floor. The waterproofing MUST be sloped to the drain, and the tile is not considered waterproofing by the codes, it is a decorative wear surface.

So the order of layers would be:
- tar paper (only if a wooden subfloor - it helps to prevent the moisture from being wicked out of the mud so it has enough to cure)
- metal lath OR a slurry of thinset or Portland cement if bonding it to a slab
- presloped mud bed - can be thinner around the drain IF it's on a slab
- liner
- setting bed (consistent layer since what's beneath it is already sloped properly
- thinset and tile

The correct way to waterproof the liner to the drain is to put a bead of silicone on the top of the drain, place the liner over it, then clamp the drain ring to it...there is NO need or desire to put silicon on top of the liner, so, at least with that operation, should not clog the weepholes.

Some water will get beneath the tile. In this type of shower build (works, but not my preference), it is expected that water will slowly flow through the porous mud bed beneath the tile and get to the liner then slowly seep out of the weep holes and down the drain.

It is likely, if the liner is truely on the floor, the drain is set too low. Over a wooden subfloor (is it wood?), the industry guidelines call for a minimum thickness of a mud bed to be 1-1/4" thick. Now, many people get by with maybe 3/4-1", but anything less is likely to break up.

Check out www.johnbridge.com for help with building your shower.

Personally, I'd build my shower with a surface applied membrane, then you only need a single mud bed, and, you might be able to keep your drain (once you get the ring off!) and use a conversion upper portion required for that type of construction. Several companies make them. Check out www.schluter.com for one of them to review some of their videos on how to construct it. The pan works with a mudbed or a preformed high density foam one.
 
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