Cycle Stop Valves - CSV125 vs CSV1A For Residential

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Zane Bridgers

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There are a lot of filters that are rated for enough pressure to work before the CSV. And you are right that sand will probably not completely shut off the water flow and burn up the pump. A CSV1A will last a long time with some sand and debris, but filtering will make it last longer.
 

Reach4

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Do you think 200 PSI would survive? Any filters you’ve used for this application in the past?
It's the housing that sees the pressure. The filter element does not see that pressure across it; it only sees the differential, which would be low.
I would put a pressure gauges around the element to see if it is clogging at all.
 

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I would put a pressure gauges around the element to see if it is clogging at all.

That’s a good idea! Would be peace of mind if nothing else.

Again, if you are sure about the static level, the filter will only see 140 PSI.
I haven’t checked the static level since the well was drilled, but we did it and our driller did it with us and we got the same number.
 

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I haven’t checked the static level since the well was drilled, but we did it and our driller did it with us and we got the same number.
You could momentarily deadhead the pump into a 200 psi pressure gauge, if you can undo connections easily enough. That should give a worst case pressure.
 

Zane Bridgers

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That would totally stress me out haha. Part of my motivation to get the pressure tank plumbed is to avoid accidentally dead heading the pump. That said I could definitely throw a 200 psi gauge there and run the CSV near it’s minimum to get a real world number. Would be better than nothing.

Unfortunately that filter is not NSF. Called the manufacturer. Next best I can find are the Rusco models at 150psi. Called them to ask if that’s a realistic working PSI or a marketing gimmick and they swore by it, but I think I’m better off monitoring it as you said and getting some numbers first.
 

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Deadheading is how you check a pump. Deadheading actually makes the pump/motor work easier, not harder. You just can't leave it deadheaded for more than a minute or so, to keep the water from getting hot. But all pump manufacturers will say it is OK to deadhead their pump for 60 seconds.
 

Zane Bridgers

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Fair enough! It does make sense that it's less strain than pushing 10gpm 400' up. I take it this is a wise thing to do now before it's all plumbed to know the maximum PSI the system can put out? Is 60 seconds how long it will take to build that pressure or will say 30 seconds work?

On another note, what wire/conduit is generally run from the well house sub-panel=>pressure switch=>pump controller? Looks like a lot of folks just run UF cable, others run what I assume is THWN in FMC/liquidtight conduit. I also have plenty of flat 8awg well wire left, but I don't think it will fit in the 1/2 pressure switch knockout.
 

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Fair enough! It does make sense that it's less strain than pushing 10gpm 400' up. I take it this is a wise thing to do now before it's all plumbed to know the maximum PSI the system can put out? Is 60 seconds how long it will take to build that pressure or will say 30 seconds work?

On another note, what wire/conduit is generally run from the well house sub-panel=>pressure switch=>pump controller? Looks like a lot of folks just run UF cable, others run what I assume is THWN in FMC/liquidtight conduit. I also have plenty of flat 8awg well wire left, but I don't think it will fit in the 1/2 pressure switch knockout.
I would think 2 seconds, but 5 should give some margin and time for the gauge to settle. Looks like there is plenty of time margin both ways, to me.

30 amp breaker in the subpanel? The sub-panel=>pressure switch=>pump controller wiring is all above ground in the well house?
 

Zane Bridgers

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Awesome - thanks Reach!

Yeah, it's actually a well vault 130' from the house and has it's own separate meter since it will be a well share. So yes, the subpanel w/ 30amp breaker, pressure switch and pump controller are all underground in the vault within 3' of each other. Looking at the pressure switch rubber grommet, it seems more designed to be fed individual conductors and not cable. Does that sound right?
 

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While you are wiring stuff up, consider a sump pump or utility pump to keep the water level lower than the casing, in case the vault floods.

As far as that grommet goes, I suspect you could fit #2o NM (e.g., Romex) through that grommet. Maybe that is what they had in mind. Of course you need #10, and I don't know if regular NM would be suitable for a pit. Maybe you could run flex conduit and get the wires thru that.

I would think most pressure switches have an electrical fitting coming in, even if that is a cable clamp.
halex-conduit-fittings-20511-c3_145.jpg
 
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Zane Bridgers

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A sump pump is a good idea. I could tee the pressure release valve into the same pipe that runs outside. Some type of float switch or alarm, while a bit more complicated, might also be a good idea too. The biggest float switches I see are 25A, but that should be ample for the 2HP Pump even though it's fed off a 30A breaker.

NM-B/romex is not allowed per the NEC in wet locations. UF cable has thicker sheathing though and may be a tight fit. Seems like maybe individual THWN conductors in liquid tight would be the safest.

Can anyone else chime in on what they use?
 

Zane Bridgers

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I checked another install in the area and found liquidtight with individual THHN conductors, so I went with the same.

I have a question about the pressure tank with/without the CSV. If I am running a hose bib wide open, will the pump constantly cycle filling and emptying the tank? I would imagine it depends on whether the flow is enough to keep the pressure below the cut off on the pressure switch, which would require some trial and error monitoring and adjustment. Is that right? I'm trying to delay installing the CSV for a bit in hopes the sand will keep clearing up. I ran 2000 more gallons and it's better but still a good bit of sand occasionally.

For the dead head pressure test, is it a bad idea to start the pump dead headed? I would imagine if there was any air in the line, it would skew the reading, but I'm having trouble figuring out an easy way to plumb it.
 

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It depends on how big the hose bibb is. Because you are right that is has to let out enough water to keep the tank from filling to the switch cut off point. Or you can use two/three hose bibbs to make that happen.

Starting a pump against a closed valve is the best thing for it. You just don't want to leave the valve closed to less than 1 GPM for more than a minute. Air in the lines won't affect a pressure test.
 

Zane Bridgers

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Awesome! Thank you so much for the prompt response! I think multiple hose bibs and monitoring the pressure switch would do the trick!

I will start the pump with the valve closed. I know a minimum run time of 1 minute is recommended for the motor, but for just this once I think it will survive a 30 second cycle to get a pressure reading. Good to know a little air won't cause issues.
 
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