Copper pipe too short for tub spout

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Deb 88

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Hi all,

Well we moved into our recently purchased house only to find out that the diverter on the tub spout leaked horrendously. We were unable to remove what appeared to be a threaded spout (it kept turning but not coming off), and finally called a plumber who was kind enough to fulfill my request and cut off the old spout (he wanted to go straight to cutting the drywall).

It turns out that the copper pipe had been cut far too short for a slip on spout (only 1 1/4 inch from tile) and so some sort of adaptor had been screwed on (with a set screw), and then this screwed into a front-end threaded spout. (Apologies for my non-technical language)

I put this "adaptor" into a new universal spout however once it was all screwed on, it still leaked a little at the wall (only when the diverter was on to the shower, not when just the bath was running). I undid/redid it all again but this made no difference.

At Lowe's today, they suggested I get a Shark tooth adaptor to slip onto the copper pipe and then screw on a rear-end threaded spout, however when I set this all up with the spout I saw that this will cause the spout to stick out from the wall by a good inch so not a solution.

My only other thought before cutting into the drywall is to try to solder a male adaptor onto the pipe, but the pipe isn't long enough to do this.

Can I just put the original adaptor back on and silicone it, hoping that that will stop any leaks? Is there any way I can get a shorter connection to screw in the spout (to connect shark tooth adaptor and front threaded spout?)

The plumber seemed to think the only way was to cut into the drywall and replace pipes and I may have to give up and let them do that, just trying to see if anything else is possible!

Thanks
 

Reach4

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My only other thought before cutting into the drywall is to try to solder a male adaptor onto the pipe, but the pipe isn't long enough to do this.
How about soldering on a coupler, and then soldering an extension to that?


Hmmm.
a492305b-3cbc-4fda-baef-a647085eeabb_145.jpg




What would really be nice is if you could solder onto your existing pipe the RP12307

DELRP12307.jpg


adapter that comes with the Delta Faucet RP17454 and RP17453 diverter faucets. My notes say that the adapter should be between 1/4" and 1" from wall surface. Those are especially nice diverters. Medium priced, but really functional. I did not solder mine on. I am afraid that the soldering is done inside where the O-ring is.
I doubt that would clear the OD of the coupler.
 
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Terry

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delta_tub_spout_a1.jpg


The Delta adapter that can either installed with a nipple, or soldered on.
There is room under that for a coupling and an added section of copper.

GOOD

delta_tub_spout_a2.jpg


They make a few spouts that work with that .

delta_tub_spout.jpg


And their basic diverter spout.

GOOD

We love using the Delta spouts in this situation.

What I don't like is this style of tub spout below.
There are too many places for it to leak.

grohe.13.611.b.jpg


This one is Grohe, but the same junk is sold under other brands too.
JUNK

grohe.13.611.a.jpg



grohe.13.611.c.jpg


I would not install this again.
Junk
 
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Deb 88

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Terry, let me just confirm

[The Delta adapter that can either installed with a nipple, or soldered on.
There is room under that for a coupling and an added section of copper.]

So if I solder on an added section of copper using a coupler the Delta Adaptor will still be able to slide on top and be secured with the set screw the correct distance from the wall?

When you say installed with a nipple, would I still need a longer section of pipe for this?
 

Reach4

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http://answers.deltafaucet.com/answ...ing-tub-spout-questions-answers/questions.htm says "The RP12307 tub spout adapter measures 1.80" in length and 1.12" in diameter."

That Delta adapter can sweat (solder) onto 1/2 inch copper pipe, or can screw on to a 1/2 inch NPT nipple.

Rather than sweat a coupler on, I think you have the option of putting a 1/2 copper to 1/2 NPT male adapter on your pipe, I think after cutting down your existing pipe a bit.
1a307efa-9a3b-4264-8bc9-0deeb7994220_65.jpg
The adapter gives you the same thread that a nipple would. After soldering, the tip of the adapter in that case should be 5/8" to 1-5/8" from the wall surface. You would aim for 1-1/8 to put you right in the middle of the range that works. I would think you would want to have everything with you to check with real parts before cutting or soldering stuff. I think I wrote things down correctly, but have the real parts to make sure.

When screwing the Delta adapter to the 1/2 NPT adapter, you would use teflon tape. I would put a little plumber's silicone grease on the O-ring before screwing on the spout, but I think that is not required.
 
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hj

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quote; e Delta Adaptor will still be able to slide on top and be secured with the set screw

The Delta adapter I have sitting next to me does NOT have a "set screw". It either solders or screws on to a pipe thread.
 

Jadnashua

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The nice thing about the Delta adapter is that you have some flexibility on where it is mounted, then, you have more flexibility since the spout is then screwed onto the adapter. Since it is sealing to the spout with the o-ring, getting it exactly at the right distance so that it is tight and against the wall is not an issue...it's waterproof from the o-ring seal, the screw threads just hold it in place. If you use a standard threaded adapter, the tapered pipe threads require it to be just at the right place (depth) so that it can get tight enough to seal when it just comes up against the wall. ANd, I think the Delta pull-down divertor works better longer.
 

Reach4

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If you use a standard threaded adapter, the tapered pipe threads require it to be just at the right place (depth) so that it can get tight enough to seal when it just comes up against the wall.
You are mistaken about that. There is a significant range of acceptable protrusion of the tapered thread that works fine. The spout then screwing onto the Delta adapter is what provides the range of adjustment.

If you use a standard threaded adapter, the tapered pipe threads require it to be just at the right place (depth) so that it can get tight enough to seal when it just comes up against the wall.
With the old server there were others frequently making double posts. That has been cured by the new faster server.
 

Terry

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I would pick up a Delta spout that uses this adapter.

Add a coupling and pipe, solder that up, then add the adapter and solder that.
The spout spins on. They have several types of diverter spouts to choose from.
No set screw, it just spins on.

delta_tub_spout_a1.jpg


The Delta adapter

tub-spout-solder-extension.jpg


Or if it's a thread on spout.
 
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Jadnashua

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You are mistaken about that. There is a significant range of acceptable protrusion of the tapered thread that works fine. The spout then screwing onto the Delta adapter is what provides the range of adjustment.

With the old server there were others frequently making double posts. That has been cured by the new faster server.
I was referring to using a conventional, screw-on spout, not the Delta unit. A double-post happened to me today...the system was taking forever to echo my keystrokes, and did another double-post.
 

Bender1524

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So if my Delta adapter has a set screw, is soldering still required? Or can I just cut the copper stubout to the right length, and tighten the set screw? I can't tell if soldering is just to hold the adapter in place (like a set screw) or if it has other purposes. Just seems too easy to have a set screw vs soldering.
 

Reach4

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The set screw also works. That one seals with the O-Ring inside on the copper.

The other one is IP or solder.
What I am now suspecting is that the RP33794 , the adapter that has a set screw, mounts closer to the wall than the RP12307 (IP or solder) adapter. I suspect no spout is compatible with both. Not sure.

The RP12307 tub spout adapter measures 1.80" in length and 1.12" in diameter.
 
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