New Pressure Tank Long Jet Pump Runtimes

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Reach4

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Find where the leak is first. It may take another turn on a threaded joint. If the leak is at a barb-to hose place, another 1/4 turn on the worm gear clamps might solve that.

Or maybe there is no leak, and the problem is something else. How far down is the surface of your water below the top of the pump?

Or would I have to wait til water level is down and take the shut off right out of the line, retape and tighten together with pipe wrench?
I don't understand about waiting until the water level is down. Turn off the pump, and go, I would think.

Or maybe you mean to wait until the water in the pressure tank is down. Easy enough... just open a valve and drain the water.
 

Bannerman

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Perhaps the plastic barb hose fitting has a small crack that is allowing air to enter, in which case, replacing the fitting may be necessary.

When using 2 gear clamps, orientate the gears so they are each on the opposite side of the pipe. Even as the gears are currently facing opposite directions, both gears are placed beside each other. Because each clamp band must rise away from the pipe where the band enters the gear mechanism, there maybe insufficient compression force on the pipe at that location which may allow some air to leak where the gear clamp is exerting the least clamping pressure.. Offsetting the 2 gear mechanisms to opposite sides of the pipe will reduce the potential for air leakage between the pipe and the barbed fitting.

Is your cistern above ground, so the water within the cistern is higher than the inlet to the pump?
 
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AGageM

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Find where the leak is first. It may take another turn on a threaded joint. If the leak is at a barb-to hose place, another 1/4 turn on the worm gear clamps might solve that.

Or maybe there is no leak, and the problem is something else. How far down is the surface of your water below the top of the pump?


I don't understand about waiting until the water level is down. Turn off the pump, and go, I would think.

Or maybe you mean to wait until the water in the pressure tank is down. Easy enough... just open a valve and drain the water.
I meant water level in the cistern, the level is higher than the pump and taking the shut off out would cause tons of water to come in on me, but I tightened what I could and am giving it a couple minutes to see if any water accumulates outside the pipes.

Perhaps the plastic barb hose fitting has a small crack that is allowing air to enter, in which case, replacing the fitting may be necessary.

When using 2 gear clamps, orientate the gears so they are each on the opposite side of the pipe. Even as the gears are currently facing opposite directions, both gears are placed beside each other. Because the clamp band must rise away from the pipe where the band enters the gear mechanism, there maybe insufficient compression force on the pipe at that location which may allow some air to leak. Offsetting the 2 gear mechanisms to opposite sides of the pipe will reduce the potential for air leakage between the pipe and the barbed fitting.

I didn't realize both clamps were like that, all the others I have put on opposite sides of the pipe, I didn't change that one for some reason, thanks for pointing that out
 

Reach4

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I meant water level in the cistern, the level is higher than the pump and taking the shut off out would cause tons of water to come in on me, but I tightened what I could and am giving it a couple minutes to see if any water accumulates outside the pipes.
Cool. Now I understand that valve, and I guess that justifies the valve. Just be really sure nobody closes that valve when the pump is on.

That can of shaving cream will end speculation. Don't forget to slather up the connection at the pump.

Air can suck in through cracks that won't let water out. It is not that the water molecules are bigger, but they stick together.
 

Valveman

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I can't find the max pressure on that pump? My guess is it will barely build 50 PSI, so probably should leave it on a 20/40 switch.

Loosen the hose clamps. Let the barb fitting spin in the plastic pipe while using a wrench to tighten the fitting. Then put the hose clamps back with the buckles on opposite sides.
 

WorthFlorida

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I can't find the max pressure on that pump? My guess is it will barely build 50 PSI, so probably should leave it on a 20/40 switch.

Loosen the hose clamps. Let the barb fitting spin in the plastic pipe while using a wrench to tighten the fitting. Then put the hose clamps back with the buckles on opposite sides.
Cary is probably right about the pump not able to building pressure. the first post you mentioned you upped the pressure to 30/50.. Then things went south after that and that was my first though the pressure is too much for these set up. Those joints and clamp fittings worked OK to 40PSI.

The FLEX Tape, Spray and all of the other claims are only a patch, not a fix. It may work but it is only to buy you time and eventually that product will fail.
 

AGageM

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Cary is probably right about the pump not able to building pressure. the first post you mentioned you upped the pressure to 30/50.. Then things went south after that and that was my first though the pressure is too much for these set up. Those joints and clamp fittings worked OK to 40PSI.

The FLEX Tape, Spray and all of the other claims are only a patch, not a fix. It may work but it is only to buy you time and eventually that product will fail.

I just got back and cooking dinner, the pump is off and am draining lines again. I'm going to change the switch back to 20/40 and lower the tank to 18 psi. The leaks were there prior to turning the pressure up, but the tank pressure was set too high at a precharged 38 so pump was short cycling a lot. Wasn't like that long before we changed pressure switch and tank pressure. The leaks came from adding the shut off valve, the guy who put it in didn't tighten enough and I believe the hose barbs used were garbage, I literally put a hose on with no force whatsoever, so I think that's where our leaks are. The flex seal was only going to be temporary for when our cistern empties and I am able to put new hose barbs olinto shut off and hope that fixes my leak. Thanks so much for all the help along this journey. I am by no means smart on this subject and I've appreciated everyone here big time. My father passed away earlier this year so my brother and I are trying to figure things out as we go. I will let everyone know how it works once I change settings in a little bit!
 

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When I turned it up, 1 full turn went from about 42 to 50, 1 full turn CCW went down to 46, still 5 minute run time with 20 psi in tank, am I able to unplug pump and change pressure switch without completely draining the lines?
 

Reach4

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When I turned it up, 1 full turn went from about 42 to 50, 1 full turn CCW went down to 46, still 5 minute run time with 20 psi in tank, am I able to unplug pump and change pressure switch without completely draining the lines?
Yes, but do you think you need a new pressure switch? They are cheap, so what the heck.

Drain the pressure out. The drain valve is normally lower than the pressure switch. Put a pan or towel under the pressure switch to collect misc water. Make the change. Use pipe dope and/or PTFE tape on the tapered threads.
 

AGageM

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Yes, but do you think you need a new pressure switch? They are cheap, so what the heck.

Drain the pressure out. The drain valve is normally lower than the pressure switch. Put a pan or towel under the pressure switch to collect misc water. Make the change. Use pipe dope and/or PTFE tape on the tapered threads.
Sorry I may have worded that wrong, I meant adjust the pressure switch settings without draining the lines and tank. I'm down to 20/40 and the run time is around 3 min and 40 seconds, it's definitely better but I still have the leaks. I am waiting for our cistern water level to drop down before taking out the shut off valve and attaching new hose barbs. I found that's where my leaks are, but with the water level still so high in cistern the pressure is too much to replace the hose barbs now. Will let you know what happens after leaks are fixed, but it makes a lot of sense to me that that's what is causing the slow fill times. When that was said, it made me think of drinking through a straw with a crack in it, doesn't work too great. If this doesn't work, I have a convertible jet pump for the well (outside tap) that I can use to replace the one I am using currently. Thanks for all the help and hopefully I get this figured out when the water is low enough in the cistern to do so!
 
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