Dripping in drain pipe under toilet.

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Sunnyday

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Hello. Looking for a little advice. Just replaced a leaking Sloan flushmate system. Water was leaking into tank from a hole in the old flushmate. Relatively easy install but now that the new one is in I am hearing a dripping sound in the cellar under the toilet. Sounds like it’s in the PVC piping and hitting at the elbow. No water to be found. Only hearing it after flushing for a bit, more rapid at first then slows to a stop and when someone uses the bathroom displacing some of the water from the bowl. We did hear this noise before replacing the flushmate for a few days but that was only because we started listening for sounds/looking for water because we were aware we had a problem. (Who knows how long it was making that noise!) The hope was it disappeared after the new one was installed. Anyone have any helpful advice or ideas on what it could be??
 

Reach4

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Normal.

The water in the bowl is settling down to the level of the weir in the toilet.
 

deemika

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I have the same issue. I have a house built in 2008 which has PVC drain piping (not cast iron). Two toilets on the main floor and one toilet upstairs on the second floor. All toilets are the same age, make & model. About 6 months ago, I heard a dripping sound after the upstairs toilet was flushed, but no evidence of stains or water damage on the ceiling below the toilet. The wax seal was original so I had plumber come out and sure enough, there was a small leak where the wax ring had failed. So the plumber replaced the wax ring. Now when the toilet was flushed, I still heard a dripping sound for 2-3 minutes after the toilet is flushed. So the plumber came back and lifted the toilet - NO water leakage found anywhere. So he put the toilet back with another new Jumbo wax ring, but still the 2-3 minutes of dripping is heard after each flush. This toilet NEVER made the dripping sound for the previous 10 years before the original wax ring failed, nor do the other two toilets make the dripping sound, and remember ALL three toilets are exactly the same age/make/model. I checked the water level inside the tank, and it stops filling at the proper level, so no water is dripping down inside the overflow tube. And their is no water leaking/dripping from the Flush Valve Gasket on the bottom of the inside tank - that's tight as a drum.
So my question: Am I simply hearing water trickling down inside the toilet horn internally down into the sewer drain? If so, why the dripping sound? (water always follows the inside surface of pipes, so I shouldn't be hearing any drips) Why don't the other two identical toilets make that sound? And why did the second floor toilet start making the dripping sound AFTER the original wax ring failed and was replaced when the toilet never made the sound in the previous 10 years?
Please reply and Many Thanks
 

Reach4

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So my question: Am I simply hearing water trickling down inside the toilet horn internally down into the sewer drain? If so, why the dripping sound? (water always follows the inside surface of pipes, so I shouldn't be hearing any drips)
2-3 minutes seem like a long time.
Why don't the other two identical toilets make that sound? And why did the second floor toilet start making the dripping sound AFTER the original wax ring failed and was replaced when the toilet never made the sound in the previous 10 years?
Let me suggest a cure that may make those moot. Mark the height of water in the bowl 10 minutes after a flush. Adjust the refill tube to bring the water after a flush only up to that mark. If your refill is not adjustable, consider a pinch clamp on your refill tube or get a nice new adjustable refill valve.

Depending on how variable your water pressure is, this may not give a perfect cure. But close enough I suspect.
 

Jadnashua

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On a windy day, the air pressure in the vent stack can cause the water in a toilet to rock slightly...when it rocks one way, it can overflow the weir and drain a very small amount out. The design of some toilets make this more prevalent than on others.

If your water pressure is excessive, you might be getting a weep out of the fill valve, especially as the internal seals wear. That can happen even if your water pressure isn't excessive, but happens much quicker when it is.
 
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