Delta 600 shower valve replacement

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Terry

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How many times does a homeowner do this to a Delta 600 when they try to remove the bonnet?

delta-600-replace-06.jpg


If a person isn't careful, you can twist the three soft copper tubes to the body of the faucet.
My fix is to cut out the old Delta 600 and install a new valve body. Moen makes an easy replacement with a wide trim.

delta-600-replace-01.jpg


You can see here the twist in the valve. The slot was on the vertical, not leaning at a 45.
Here I've used the template to mark the wall for my cut.

delta-600-replace-02.jpg


And cut.

delta-600-replace-03.jpg


I've cut the supplies, heated the valve body and dropped it off the shower supply.

delta-600-replace-04.jpg


Sand and clean the pipe, and solder in a new Moen 62320 valve body.

delta-600-replace-05.jpg


Finishing with the TL2368EP valve trim.
 

Cjccmc

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Yikes! I never thought about the forces on the tubing when taking off the bonnet nut. Mine was a Valley and I needed a 12" pipe wrench to get it off. Fortunately the pipe connections provided good support against my wrench torque but I didn't know or think about it before I started.

Thanks for posting this. I'm guessing the proper way to remove the bonnet involves a second wrench to react the torque on the bonnet?
 

Terry

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Some comments from plumbers.

Looks like it already is twisted counterclockwise. I use a torch. Sometimes the cam washer will start melting. Not to much pressure on the channel locks. And it should come loose.
Richard

Pb blaster. Amazing stuff.
Aaron

I wrap a piece of emery around it real tight and turn by hand.
Jimmy

Cut the nut off. They sell replacement nuts.
Travis

I use a hose clamp. You apply even pressure all the way around. Then turn with channel locks.
Kyle

Dremel and cutting wheel, just make sure you have a bonnet nut for the replacement. I have had to do this on the newer Deltas pressure balance valves.
Alan

Hacksaw blade works, as long as you can replace the nut.
Paul

Opposing hammers...tap tap tap all the way around it a time or 2 and should come right off.
Pat

Pb blast let set and tap on it.
Jesse

The trick is not to egg the bonnet with your channel locks. Give it a few taps and go easy on it. Once you bend the tubes, you're down the river in a raft without a paddle. Or something like that.
Mike

A little heat with a torch on the bonnet to expand it and then very carefully without egging the bonnet unthread with pliers.
Terry

Chainsaw!
Kenneth
 

hj

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Usually, I just replace the three tubes when it happens to other contractors or DIYers, (it usually happens on the weekend). You cannot use a second wrench because the chrome sleeve is just slipped over the body and will not "hold back" even if you squeeze it tightly.

delta-shower-broken.jpg
 

Matt Foell

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This post was very helpful as I just went through this myself.

The only warning I would provide to people going down this path...the faceplate used above is only going to work on a wall that is flat. My shower stall has a curve to the right of the area where this was installed so I could not get the faceplate to sit flush.

I was able to use a Danco Remodeling Plate which is made of plastic to match the curve of the shower stall and then put in a standard 7 inch round faucet kit on top of that. The Danco plate sits near perfect and I just made sure to apply a liberal amount of silicone when installing.

Hope this helps others in the future!

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Phog

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It looks like I'll be tackling replacement of one of these myself at some point in the future. I've got one that is bent slightly downward and to the right -- not from twisting, but more likely from someone or something hitting it (this is a rental property). Not only is the valve body at an angle but the ball stem is bent to the side as well in the same direction. Everything still works fine but the faucet is starting to drip, and instead of repairing a bent valve I'm thinking it might just make sense to put it a new valve body such as the moen mentioned above.

Question I have here. This is a 4-way connection (hot & cold in, tub diverter spout down, shower head up). In Terry's above example it appears to be a 3-way shower stall connection without a tub spout, making the install easier. Can some of you pros give your opinion for the best way for this DIYer to tackle soldering in the new body? My first thought is to solder short 1" stubs into the vertical (shower & tub diverter) line connections on the valve body before putting it into the wall. Cut the in-wall vertical lines to match exactly and slide copper repair unions back onto those two pipes. Then i should be able to slide in the incoming hot & cold lines into the valve body, solder those connections, then slide the repair fittings over the 1" stubs and solder those.

Comments/questions? Am I overthinking this?

IMG_20191016_205333.jpg
IMG_20191016_205341.jpg
 
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Terry

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I like to solder pipe to the valve first before installing in the wall. That way I can evenly heat the valve and check the solder joint.
The couplings require less heat for a good joint and it's easier to get the flame there. Always remove the cartridge while soldering.
 

Phog

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I like to solder pipe to the valve first before installing in the wall. That way I can evenly heat the valve and check the solder joint.
The couplings require less heat for a good joint and it's easier to get the flame there. Always remove the cartridge while soldering.

Thanks Terry. Just wondering if you can recall back to the job in the pics you posted above -- do you remember what you did there? (I know it's been a couple years). I don't see any repair couplings there (aka 1/2" copper coupling w/o stop).
 

Terry

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. I don't see any repair couplings there (aka 1/2" copper coupling w/o stop).

I cut the valve out on the supply sides, heated the valve from the riser and slid it off, heated up the 90's and slid them off.
I may have soldered it all in place with this one. The oval trim plate gives a bit more room to work with.
 

JoeKludge

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Have tried all the suggested solutions, except for the torch, and still can't remove stuck shower valve bonnet nut. It looks like a Delta 600 series, but I can't find any branding anywhere on it. The plastic handle is also unmarked. The knurled ring is a hair over 2 inches in outside diameter. It was installed when the house was built in 1983. I think I'm going to have to dremel off the bonnet nut. Can anyone tell me where to get a replacement bonnet nut? Thank you.

PhotoShowerValve.jpg
 

Phog

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I used the Bonnet nut P/N Delta RP50. I also bought a new knob - Delta RP2389 and Ball & Seals Kit - Danco 86971 and performed the complete rebuild while it was apart. Those parts plus a dab of silicone grease was all it took. All were purchased off the shelf at my local Home Depot.

I had to dremel off the bonnet nut like you. I cut a groove about 3/4 of the way through and then put a flat blade screwdriver in the groove I cut. Twisted the screwdriver and the groove split the rest of the way through the nut. No damage to threads at all. Good luck.
 

JoeKludge

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Thanks a lot for the response, cutting suggestion, and parts information. Can you tell me if the knurled ring of RP50 bonnet nut measures a hair over 2 inches o.d.? Looking at the vendor photos of it, I can't tell if it's as large as my old one. Thanks again.
 

Phog

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Unfortunately I don't have access to measure anymore. Apologies. (But 2" seems roughly accurate going by memory). You have the one with the triangle plastic cam, whereas I had the one with the slot, but I am pretty sure the bonnet nut is common to both. You can find parts diagrams of it by searching Google, they show both variations on a single diagram. Good luck
 
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