Toilet plumbing and wet vent - remodel

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Bceverson

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Hey everyone, thanks for taking a look at my remodel and specifically toilet plumbing/ wet vent questions.

The main questions are:
1. Can I:
A. use a 3x3x3x3 wye with a toilet/WC on one side and a tub/shower combo on the other. I understand that the toilet should be the furthest from the vent to reduce syphon issues but can it be tied at the furthest point? OR, If I cannot do the 3x3x3x3 Wye, I would plan to...
B. pull up more subfloor and have the wye + 1/8 street last for the WC and then another wye for the tub/shower next in line closer to the vent. Room is tight and less floor to remove so I’d prefer route A.

2. Will the wet vent function properly with plumbing designed for my toilet, tub/shower, floor drain and Lav (double faucet, single drain).

3. is the existing vertical 1.5” vent large enough for washer, wc, lav, tub, floor drain?

4. AAV’s are okay where I live, should I add one to my lav just in case?

5. for lav and washer, can a sharp 90 be used from vertical to horizontal transition?

I have included a couple drawings / pics of our project. Thank you for your help!

Bret
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Only bathroom fixtures in the same BathRoom can be included in horizontal wet venting.

AAVs can be used to introduce air/break siphon as long as the drain overall connects to a stack that vents through the roof per manufactures guidelines

Transistions from Vertical to Horizontal must be a long sweep.. horizontal to horizontal too.

The double WYE may be tricky if your inspector sees it as not having slope from both directions in the most technical sense.. using street 45's sloped up effectively gets slope from both sides... but some people can't get over that tiny 1" of flat part of each side of the fitting.
House Drains.jpg
 
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Bceverson

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Only bathroom fixtures in the same BathRoom can be included in horizontal wet venting.

AAVs can be used to introduce air/break siphon as long as the drain overall connects to a stack that vents through the roof per manufactures guidelines

Transistions from Vertical to Horizontal must be a long sweep.. horizontal to horizontal too.

The double WYE may be tricky if your inspector sees it as not having slope from both directions in the most technical sense.. using street 45's sloped up effectively gets slope from both sides... but some people can't get over that tiny 1" of flat part of each side of the fitting.
View attachment 72576

thank you for your response and diagram.

For clarification, all of these fixtures will be in the same room.

I currently have a vent through the roof where the lav used to be which is next to where the washer is going to be placed. Can I leave that vent in place and have the washer trap arm connect to that existing vertical? It looks like I’ll be able to add the vertical vent at the new lav and tie it into the existing vent in the attic. Or is it necessary to run the washer drain down around the wc?

I see what you mean about the double wye issue being a bit flat for a small section, it can’t slope both sides toward the center drain unless the street 45 is done at an angle to reduce the flatness in a sense. Just my speculation and thinking out loud... the higher flow volume from a toilet or tub draining with tilted street 45 connectors should be adequate to keep the water and waste moving along.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Laundry fixtures are not considered Bathroom fixtures for the purpose of the plumbing code even if you were to take baths in them so they can't be included in the Horizontal Wet Vented bathroom group. Yes the laundry must connect downstream of the bathroom group.

The double wye with slightly tilted up street 45's is the commonly recognized way to use that fitting properly... But you will have the occasional inspector who sees only the letter of the law and not the practical application, so it may pay to ask for permission rather than ask for forgiveness in that case.

Each vent can go separately through the roof or combine if sized properly for your particular code application.
 
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