Shower Drain 2"?

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HereInOhio

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I roughed in a bathroom in my basement for a tub (1 1/2" PVC) but afterwards decided to install a shower instead. I see a 2" drain is suggested on here for showers. I'm assuming it's because if a shower clogs it overflows a lot faster than a tub.

The trap is connecting directly to the 3" drain via 3"x3"x2" wye (with 2" to 1 1/2" reducer already glued in). I wanted to mention this because there is not a lot of horizontal 1 1/2" pipe it's draining through.

Quick Question: Do I need to (or is it strongly suggested) to increase the trap from 1 1/2" to 2"? I'm hoping due to the short distance the 1 1/2" is fine.

I have cut and peeled off fittings before so I'm familiar/confident I can do so. I don't like doing it if I don't have to, I feel like the connection is somewhat weakened. Using the 2" would also push the trap past where it needs to be in the pan so I would have to run a short section of pipe and basically have the trap loop back if that makes sense.
 

Terry

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A 1.5" trap works, doesn't meet code now, but it did in the 60's when we had high flow shower heads.
I normally increase to 2" for the drain above the trap. There are plenty of folks as they get older that want a walk-in shower instead of their old tub.
 

wwhitney

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IPC, in use in OH, allows a 1.5" shower drain/trap for up to 5.7 GPM of shower heads (IIRC). Seems like most shower drains are 2" so you'd have to adapt down to 1.5" to make the existing work. Switching everything to 2" would be cleanest.

What's the venting on the shower? If the 3x3x2 wye you mention is horizontal, and the 3" line is carrying only bathroom fixtures, including a dry vented lav, then that can wet vent the shower.

Cheers, Wayne
 

HereInOhio

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IPC, in use in OH, allows a 1.5" shower drain/trap for up to 5.7 GPM of shower heads (IIRC). Seems like most shower drains are 2" so you'd have to adapt down to 1.5" to make the existing work. Switching everything to 2" would be cleanest.

What's the venting on the shower? If the 3x3x2 wye you mention is horizontal, and the 3" line is carrying only bathroom fixtures, including a dry vented lav, then that can wet vent the shower.

Cheers, Wayne
The wye is only carrying bathroom fixtures and wet venting the shower via a dry vented lav as you mentioned.

The limited space is the main reason I'm trying to avoid removing the 1.5" reducer. In the past I used a multi tool to make small slices just barely through the piece I'm removing and peeled it back with needle nose. If it was real stubborn I used heat and it came off easily. I saw a drill bit that reams the old pipe or fitting out. Do you guys have any tricks or recommendations of what works easiest for a reasonable amount of $?
 

Reach4

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Tip or recommendation for what? --
removing a 2" x 1-1/2" PVC DWV Reducer Coupling?
p102-251-2.jpg

removing a 2" x 1-1/2" PVC Schedule 40 Spigot x Socket Bushing?
437-251-2.jpg
 

HereInOhio

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Tip or recommendation for what? --
removing a 2" x 1-1/2" PVC DWV Reducer Coupling?
p102-251-2.jpg

removing a 2" x 1-1/2" PVC Schedule 40 Spigot x Socket Bushing?
437-251-2.jpg
I have the bushing glued in:

bushing.GIF


In the past I cut though it and used needle nose pliers to peel it out. If it was stubborn I used heat. Since I'm working though a 1'x9" hole in the cement it's a bit more crowded. I was wondering if you had any tips. I saw these bits before I may give a try unless I get other opinions:

Ream Bit.GIF


For this specific application once I have that bushing removed it would be nice if I could find a trap with the 90 that comes with it in a street fitting. It may allow enough room for the trap to line up with the hole in the pan. You don't know if they make it do you?
 

wwhitney

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With a fitting saver type tool, isn't removing a bushing much harder than removing a pipe?

On the rambit, the center disk has the ID of a piece of pipe (so different disks for schedules 30, 40, and 80), while the cutter has the OD of the pipe. But the ID of a bushing would be the OD of the smaller pipe size.

I guess you could glue a 1-1/2" stub of pipe into the 2 x 1-1/2" bushing, and then use the center disk from a 1-1/2" rambit on a 2" rambit, to remove the pipe stub and bushing at the same time. That's just theory, I've never tried it. You'd be removing a lot more PVC, so you'd have to go slow and I'm not sure if it would be a problem.

Cheers Wayne
 

Terry

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A RamBit will drill out a 2 x 1.5 flush bush from the 3x2 wye. Then you can glue in a new 2" pipe there.
It's easy to do, easier than how we used to do it, which was to cut a few cuts into the fitting, and then chisel out the fitting, collapsing it inward.

reed-reamer-02.jpg


Clean Ream Extreme by Reed
 

jadnashua

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Depending on where you live, and your desire/need to pass a plumbing inspection, it's best to change it to 2".
 

HereInOhio

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With a fitting saver type tool, isn't removing a bushing much harder than removing a pipe?

On the rambit, the center disk has the ID of a piece of pipe (so different disks for schedules 30, 40, and 80), while the cutter has the OD of the pipe. But the ID of a bushing would be the OD of the smaller pipe size.

I guess you could glue a 1-1/2" stub of pipe into the 2 x 1-1/2" bushing, and then use the center disk from a 1-1/2" rambit on a 2" rambit, to remove the pipe stub and bushing at the same time. That's just theory, I've never tried it. You'd be removing a lot more PVC, so you'd have to go slow and I'm not sure if it would be a problem.

Cheers Wayne
Good point. Maybe I’ll be able to swap out the washer to the correct ID for the bushing. Thanks
 

HereInOhio

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Depending on where you live, and your desire/need to pass a plumbing inspection, it's best to change it to 2".
Im not getting inspected but like to have it so it would pass either way. I waste way too much time doing so but I guess it’s a good thing. Maybe.
 

HereInOhio

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A RamBit will drill out a 2 x 1.5 flush bush from the 3x2 wye. Then you can glue in a new 2" pipe there.
It's easy to do, easier than how we used to do it, which was to cut a few cuts into the fitting, and then chisel out the fitting, collapsing it inward.

reed-reamer-02.jpg


Clean Ream Extreme by Reed
Ok thanks. I already ordered the other one. I read the Reeds are better but didn’t want to shell out the extra coin for using it once or twice.
 
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