Sewage ejector overload?

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juncohere

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Hi all. Basically I have a sewage basin and ejector pump in a basement. Currently I have just a sink that uses it. I'm now adding a full basement bathroom, which will be used by two people regularly. It is already stubbed in and connected to the tank. I'm kicking around moving laundry downstairs as well, which will then utilize this basin and pump. I would tie into an existing line that's run for the floor drain, which also goes to basin. (Just a thought, I know some people hate the idea of moving main floor laundry)

The basin is approximately 30 gallons. With the inlet height, my float configuration, etc when the pump kicks on it ejects about 10 gallons of water then shuts off. With full time bathroom use, plus laundry for a family, will that pump cycle too often? I know short cycles in rapid succession can be pump killers. I'm curious more about overall use during day. Is 24+ on/off cycles during the day impractical? Given the size and volume of the basin and pumps ability, a short run cycle is guaranteed. Perhaps with that in mind, 4-5 cycles a day is acceptable. That's what I'm curious about. Zoeller's website didn't provide much insight.

Current set up: 1/2 HP pump, 30ish gallon basin, main drain line out of house about 86" above floor, washer uses about 19 gallons per load, probably do 8-9 loads a week, on septic, two BR in basement using that bathroom (toilet, shower, sink, etc).

Washer going outside and avoiding septic (and basin) isn't an option. I also don't want to do a separate basin and pump for laundry.

Insight is appreciated.
 

Breplum

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We insist and only utilize duplex systems from Liberty. Single pump systems will fail so at least put a high water alarm in.
Pump cycles in your situation are not a serious factor. Pumps just age out over time and cycle frequency is nothing I would be worried about.
For folks with a single pump we recommend immediately purchasing a replacement pump as back up along with the high water alarm
 

juncohere

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We insist and only utilize duplex systems from Liberty. Single pump systems will fail so at least put a high water alarm in.
Pump cycles in your situation are not a serious factor. Pumps just age out over time and cycle frequency is nothing I would be worried about.
For folks with a single pump we recommend immediately purchasing a replacement pump as back up along with the high water alarm
Thank you. Buying a second pump right away is excellent advice. I will have an alarm on it, I forgot to mention that.

So cycles in the amount I'm talking about aren't as concerning as a pump killer as just age and time in the environment?
 

Reach4

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A bigger pump would not reduce cycling. Were you thinking of going to a smaller pump?

For less cycling, you could adjust the tether on the float switch to make each run a bit longer.

I think the question you would ask is if the existing pump can handle poop.

How long does your pump run when it kicks on?
 

juncohere

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My current pump is a true sewage pump, 1/2 HP. It can handle 2" solids. I wasn't planning on changing the pump or pump size. I have adjusted my float about as much as I can to allow more water in the tank, thus fewer on and off cycles.

Since my potential laundry room would drain to the sewage basin, my concern is the amount of times the laundry water would make the pump go on and off.

I'd guess the pump runs for 7-9 seconds currently before the water level drops enough for the float to kick the pump off.
 

Jeff H Young

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30 gallon sump runs 7 to 9 seconds , 1/2 h.p. , longer run time would be better but what are you going to do A go buy a smaller pump ? B install a bigger pit? C forget about it and run it? I wouldnt worry about it but if you want to rebuild it all now spend some coin now and save you hassel later I get it. measure your pit diametor height and bottom of pit to bottom of inlet (or from the top down to bottom of inlet) And design a whole new system The duplex is best but like Breplum says Liberty are high quality As are zoeller why buy one over the other Im not sure .
 

juncohere

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I don't think changing pump or basin size is practical. I just want to avoid so many pump on/off cycles that I kill a pump every 18-24 months. If that's the likely outcome, I'd just probably not move the laundry. If the pump can survive years of doing, say, 24 on/offs a day, I'd move forward with moving the laundry.
 

Reach4

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There are also switches that don't use a tether.
 

Jeff H Young

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No idea how to count those beans but gravity drain is the best drain So I guess leave the wash machine upstairs . it will be cheaper maybe peanuts but cheaper and last longer , theoreticaly of cource
 
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