Realistically, how likely is this compression valve gonna fly off?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by pman6, Aug 11, 2020.

  1. pman6

    pman6 Member

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    I thought I would be able to solder, but all I created was a leaky valve.

    So I installed this compression valve on my water heater instead.

    Used a whole lotta strength to tighten these nuts.

    Can I rest assured there's a very super unlikely chance this valve will blow itself off?

    I sanded both copper pipes going into this valve.

    There's a tiny leak at the nut on the right side. Can I super tighten the nut without damaging the pipe coming out of the wall?

    IMG_20200811_173159.jpg
     
  2. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    The valve isn't going anywhere.

    For the small leak, I would back off the nut on the wall side, and put a little pipe dope where the ferrule meets the valve and then rotate the nut back on and tighten. No tape.

    Also, the flex connector at the water heater didn't need tape either. It has a rubber seal at the end for that.
    Though normally anytime I remove a flex like that I either replace the rubber seal or toss on a new supply.
     
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  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    FWIW, using tape on a fitting that is not designed for it is a good way to create a leak, rather than stopping one.

    A tapered pipe thread requires either tape or pipe dope. Those more like a hose with a seal in them, rely on you compressing the gasket rather than stopping flow through the tapered threads. A pipe joint seals as you wedge it tight as it's tapered. A hose joint compresses the gasket at the end, and the threads are usually not tapered.
     
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  5. pman6

    pman6 Member

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    yeah. that was old tape from the guy who installed the w.h ages ago. I didn't clean it off well.
    I didn't remove the nipple end, so I left that.
    I didn't put any new tape on any thread today.




    I'm wondering if I should tighten the nut further.
    This is 1" copper, probably type M.

    2 things I learned today on the internet were...
    Overtightening can crimp the pipe.

    Also there is supposed to be a squeak noise while tightening, but I didn't hear nor feel any squeak.
    I'm a big guy, so I did apply a good amount of torque.
    though, if I wanted, I could get another quarter turn by leveraging the two wrenches.
    But again, I'm afraid of crimping the pipe.

    Does the squeak always happen?

    so maybe I didn't apply enough torque after all?
     
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    The threads on those things tends to be less that perfect, so as it tightens up, things aren't super smooth, it can gall a bit. It doesn't hurt to put a drop of oil or some pipe dope (just a dab) on the threads to help lubricate them, then, it's easier to snug it up without it tending to jump a little as it catches. A little silicone plumber's grease can work, too.
     
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  7. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    They don't squeak when I do them.
     
  8. pman6

    pman6 Member

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    ok i'll back off the nut tomorrow and see if I deformed the pipe,

    then dope and tighten. Hope that cures the drip.
     
  9. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
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    The pipe dope in this case is to help lubricate the threads, not to seal them like it does on a tapered pipe joint, so you don't need much at all, and technically, don't need any at all. It just can make it a little easier to snug it up properly. A 1" will take a bit of pressure to make a reliable seal.

    If you can grab the valve and rotate the body on the pipe, it's not tight enough.
     
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