How do I remove this old 1930s wall-mounted tank?

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ItzRav

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I'm not sure what model of toilet this is since there are no markings anywhere, but it looks like it could be original to the house built in 1930. Perhaps a Standard Modernus? At any rate, we are replacing it with a modern low-flow toilet. The tank is separate from the bowl and they're connected with an ell. As can be seen the tank is bolted or screwed to the tiled wall from inside the tank. The tank is flush with the wall so I don't think it hangs on a bracket. The problem is that the heads of the screws/bolts are rusted. How can I detach the tank from the wall? Is there a way to drill the bolts out? There is no room behind the tank to insert a hacksaw blade to cut off the bolts. Thanks for any help.

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Reach4

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Small angle grinder?
Smash away the front of the tank, and gain easy straight access for a drill?

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ItzRav

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Small angle grinder?
Smash away the front of the tank, and gain easy straight access for a drill?

Hmmm ... I have a drill with a right-angle attachment, as well as a Dremel with a right-angle attachment. If I use a drill, is there a specialized bit for drilling out the screw? Or for the Dremel, would a grinding stone work to grind it out?
 

Sylvan

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Remove the water supply, flush the tank , disconnect the flush ell , take off tank cover

Pull the tank away from the wall by pulling from the bottom wear gloves

Hand should be placed in the Douglas valve you pull straight back

Best to have some help as these old tanks are heavy

Normally the bolts are ferrous metal and are rusted and pulling from the bottom usually works as the screws pull out
 

Reach4

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Hmmm ... I have a drill with a right-angle attachment, as well as a Dremel with a right-angle attachment. If I use a drill, is there a specialized bit for drilling out the screw? Or for the Dremel, would a grinding stone work to grind it out?
In drilling out screws, I normally start small, and go bigger with several sizes. A right-angle attachment seems awkward to get the initial small hole drilled centered. The drill bits would be ordinary 60 degree tip high speed twist drills.

For the angle grinder, I think either a grinding wheel or a cutoff wheel would work. Material flies, so wear protection.


Sylvan speaks from experience. He has a faster approach. I have no tank-removing experience.
 

ItzRav

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Remove the water supply, flush the tank , disconnect the flush ell , take off tank cover

Pull the tank away from the wall by pulling from the bottom wear gloves

Hand should be placed in the Douglas valve you pull straight back

Best to have some help as these old tanks are heavy

Normally the bolts are ferrous metal and are rusted and pulling from the bottom usually works as the screws pull out

Do I understand correctly that part of what is meant to hold the tank on is that flat oblong piece of metal that you see on the right-side bolt? That it pushes the tank against the wall as the bolt is screwed in? If so, then since the left-side bolt is missing that piece of metal, if I remove it from the right-side bolt too and apply some penetrating oil, if I pull on the tank could it just slide off the bolts?
 

dj2

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If all else fails, break the tank, but make sure it's empty.
Clean up later. And yes, the broken pieces will be sharp.
You may have to replace the tiles too, as I see at least one cracked tile.
 

Terry

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If all else fails, break the tank, but make sure it's empty.
Clean up later. And yes, the broken pieces will be sharp.
You may have to replace the tiles too, as I see at least one cracked tile.

I have a nice three inch scare on my right wrist from a broken toilet tank. I was dripping blood all over the floor of the bathroom and wondering where it all was coming from. I then realized it was from me.
The next day I was supposed to do a 200 mile bike ride in two days and I had to stay home instead to let my stitches heal.
 

ItzRav

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I have a nice three inch scare on my right wrist from a broken toilet tank. I was dripping blood all over the floor of the bathroom and wondering where it all was coming from. I then realized it was from me.
The next day I was supposed to do a 200 mile bike ride in two days and I had to stay home instead to let my stitches heal.

OK, if I do go that route, I have a pair of these ;) :

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