Drip Irrigation without Pressure Reduction?

Discussion in 'Irrigation / Sprinkler Forum' started by BobD777, Jul 30, 2020.

  1. BobD777

    BobD777 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2020
    Occupation:
    Health/Enviroment Ed, Construction Background
    Location:
    Huntington, NY
    I just had a drip system installed to water 9 large green giants, and 4 fruit trees--all on one zone--and planted pretty much in a line. The drip tubing goes around each plant a few times. I looked in the valve box and don't see any kind of pressure reducing valves. Considering our water pressure is about 65psi, and it's such a long run, does it make sense that they didn't need one?

    My real questions here are about a different area of the yard. We currently have spray heads along the back of the house, but I'd like to change that whole area to a drip system. It's for two rows of hedges/ground cover that make up a linear run of maybe 100 feet. (Boxwoods and lariope.)

    1. Any recommendations on the number of holes per foot for the tubing? I was thinking of using a 1/2 inch line, like my other system.

    2. If I use a drip tubing that says it's pressure compensating, and good for 8-60psi (see the link below), do you think I can get away without reducing the pressure?

    (https://smile.amazon.com/Rain-Bird-...=drip+irrigation+tubing&qid=1596167546&sr=8-4)

    Thanks in advance for any help!
     
  2. WorthFlorida

    WorthFlorida The wife is still training me.

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2009
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Orlando, Florida
    A pressure reducer would definitely be needed of the water was pushing out so fast that it be no longer a drip system. It all depends on what you are watering. Laying it through a garden is usually no problem, raised beds or pots you may want it to be a very slow drip. Using micro tube or 1/2" drip pipe? There is really no set rule. After an install and the pressure seems too high you can add in a shutoff valve and close it off some or add a pressure reducer.

    I find too many try to make home irrigation into a science. I learned a long time ago all you are doing is dumping water onto the ground. There is consideration such as location of sprinkler heads, sprinkler types and piping. Drip reduces overspray, run off of lawn chemicals and lost of water through evaporation. If you are installing an irrigation system for a golf course, yes, that is a lot of design work and you must apply the science to it.

    At rainbird.com, search for "drip pressure reducers". From the specs on the Rainbird ET63.
    • Pressure-compensating emitters water plants evenly from beginning to end of tubing throughout the planting area
    • Built in 0.9 gallon-per-hour emitters spaced 18" apart
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2020
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  4. BobD777

    BobD777 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2020
    Occupation:
    Health/Enviroment Ed, Construction Background
    Location:
    Huntington, NY
    A belated thank you for the response! It was helpful. I especially like:

    "I find too many try to make home irrigation into a science. I learned a long time ago all you are doing is dumping water onto the ground. "

    And great suggestion on adding shutoff valve to reduce/increase pressure.

    I'll take on this project in the next few weeks.

    Thanks again!
     
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