Drip Irrigation without Pressure Reduction?

Users who are viewing this thread

BobD777

Member
Messages
43
Reaction score
3
Points
8
Location
Huntington, NY
I just had a drip system installed to water 9 large green giants, and 4 fruit trees--all on one zone--and planted pretty much in a line. The drip tubing goes around each plant a few times. I looked in the valve box and don't see any kind of pressure reducing valves. Considering our water pressure is about 65psi, and it's such a long run, does it make sense that they didn't need one?

My real questions here are about a different area of the yard. We currently have spray heads along the back of the house, but I'd like to change that whole area to a drip system. It's for two rows of hedges/ground cover that make up a linear run of maybe 100 feet. (Boxwoods and lariope.)

1. Any recommendations on the number of holes per foot for the tubing? I was thinking of using a 1/2 inch line, like my other system.

2. If I use a drip tubing that says it's pressure compensating, and good for 8-60psi (see the link below), do you think I can get away without reducing the pressure?

(https://smile.amazon.com/Rain-Bird-...=drip+irrigation+tubing&qid=1596167546&sr=8-4)

Thanks in advance for any help!
 

WorthFlorida

Clinical Trail on a Cancer Drug Started 1/31/24. ☹
Messages
5,702
Solutions
1
Reaction score
977
Points
113
Location
Orlando, Florida
A pressure reducer would definitely be needed of the water was pushing out so fast that it be no longer a drip system. It all depends on what you are watering. Laying it through a garden is usually no problem, raised beds or pots you may want it to be a very slow drip. Using micro tube or 1/2" drip pipe? There is really no set rule. After an install and the pressure seems too high you can add in a shutoff valve and close it off some or add a pressure reducer.

I find too many try to make home irrigation into a science. I learned a long time ago all you are doing is dumping water onto the ground. There is consideration such as location of sprinkler heads, sprinkler types and piping. Drip reduces overspray, run off of lawn chemicals and lost of water through evaporation. If you are installing an irrigation system for a golf course, yes, that is a lot of design work and you must apply the science to it.

At rainbird.com, search for "drip pressure reducers". From the specs on the Rainbird ET63.
  • Pressure-compensating emitters water plants evenly from beginning to end of tubing throughout the planting area
  • Built in 0.9 gallon-per-hour emitters spaced 18" apart
 
Last edited:

BobD777

Member
Messages
43
Reaction score
3
Points
8
Location
Huntington, NY
A pressure reducer would definitely be needed of the water was pushing out so fast that it be no longer a drip system. It all depends on what you are watering. Laying it through a garden is usually no problem, raised beds or pots you may want it to be a very slow drip. Using micro tube or 1/2" drip pipe? There is really no set rule. After an install and the pressure seems too high you can add in a shutoff valve and close it off some or add a pressure reducer.

I find too many try to make home irrigation into a science. I learned a long time ago all you are doing is dumping water onto the ground. There is consideration such as location of sprinkler heads, sprinkler types and piping. Drip reduces overspray, run off of lawn chemicals and lost of water through evaporation. If you are installing an irrigation system for a golf course, yes, that is a lot of design work and you must apply the science to it.

At rainbird.com, search for "drip pressure reducers". From the specs on the Rainbird ET63.
  • Pressure-compensating emitters water plants evenly from beginning to end of tubing throughout the planting area
  • Built in 0.9 gallon-per-hour emitters spaced 18" apart
A pressure reducer would definitely be needed of the water was pushing out so fast that it be no longer a drip system. It all depends on what you are watering. Laying it through a garden is usually no problem, raised beds or pots you may want it to be a very slow drip. Using micro tube or 1/2" drip pipe? There is really no set rule. After an install and the pressure seems too high you can add in a shutoff valve and close it off some or add a pressure reducer.

I find too many try to make home irrigation into a science. I learned a long time ago all you are doing is dumping water onto the ground. There is consideration such as location of sprinkler heads, sprinkler types and piping. Drip reduces overspray, run off of lawn chemicals and lost of water through evaporation. If you are installing an irrigation system for a golf course, yes, that is a lot of design work and you must apply the science to it.

At rainbird.com, search for "drip pressure reducers". From the specs on the Rainbird ET63.
  • Pressure-compensating emitters water plants evenly from beginning to end of tubing throughout the planting area
  • Built in 0.9 gallon-per-hour emitters spaced 18" apart

A belated thank you for the response! It was helpful. I especially like:

"I find too many try to make home irrigation into a science. I learned a long time ago all you are doing is dumping water onto the ground. "

And great suggestion on adding shutoff valve to reduce/increase pressure.

I'll take on this project in the next few weeks.

Thanks again!
 

IzoneDigital

New Member
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Australia
Website
izone.com.au
Most drip systems operate best at lower water pressures than are common in a typical water supply system. ... You probably will need to install a pressure regulator on your drip system if your water pressure is higher than 2,8 bars (40 PSI). Keep in mind that a pressure regulator only reduces the water pressure.

Drip Smart Irrigation isn't really all that complex. There are just a few things that you need to consider before putting a drip irrigation system together, and once you've nailed that down, the rest is kind of like Legos for water. The trouble is, we sometimes try to take shortcuts and that can lead to problems down the line. Today we'll look at what those problems are and how you can avoid them.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks