Choosing Plumber for Repipe

Users who are viewing this thread

Max Quillen

New Member
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Ohio
I'm not a plumber, but I'm trying to hire one for a total re-pipe to replace 32 year old copper with PEX, in my 2500 sft, 2 story home. Every plumbing company I've talked to just gives me a blank stare when I ask what kind of PEX they would use. This gives me the indication that they plan on using what's in stock that day at HD or Lowes. I also want to be certain all fittings/couplings are approved by the PEX mfrr.

I'm really leaning towards PEX A Uponor because I think it should be easier in the tight spaces of a remodel. What am I missing here and how does one choose a plumber. In Ohio there are some major home builders using PEX A, but I'm having a hard time finding retail plumbers that use it. I've gotten some great pricing but with no specifications in the quote, even though I've requested them. It would appear many plumbers don't think the homeowner should care what they use as long as it works.
 

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
38,841
Reaction score
4,423
Points
113
Location
IL
I'm really leaning towards PEX A Uponor because I think it should be easier in the tight spaces of a remodel.

There are advantages to the Uponor PEXA with expansion fittings, I have a hard time thinking that working in tight spaces is one of them. For each time the head-on tool placement of expansion makes working in tight spaces easier, I would think there would be other situations giving advantage for the side access of stainless steel clamps. With clamps you can get things positioned before tightening, but that also means you could forget to tighten.

I have done my limited PEX stuff with Uponor Aquapex and F1960 fittings.

https://www.pexuniverse.com/types-of-pex-fittings has some good info. It is not so much into the pros and cons.
 

Max Quillen

New Member
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Ohio
Thanks for your reply, Reach. I'm trying figure out ways to minimize dry wall cuts and damage. The house is a 2-story, typical 4 bed, 2.5 bath. I've been experiencing pinhole leaks for about 10 years now, total of 6 or so now, both hot and cold pipes. They always hit at the worst time. Shortest time between leaks has been about a year, longest 2.5 years. I've actually been somewhat lucky in that most of the leaks were caught early. Still, my ceilings have a few holes to show for it. At first I thought it was a fluke, but no such luck.

I've noticed that out west they seem to have some re-pipe companies that do the plumbing and dry-wall repair--giving them incentive to minimize damage. I am confused why none of the quotes are specific to what type of PEX they use. I believe in letting professionals choose the materials they prefer to work with, but I also don't want a mix of fittings/pipe.
 

Terry

The Plumbing Wizard
Staff member
Messages
29,942
Reaction score
3,459
Points
113
Location
Bothell, Washington
Website
terrylove.com
I have only used the expansion PEX so those are my tools. The crimp PEX has it's own tools. I will say that repiping with PEX sure feels less scary than turning the water off to the home and soldering with a torch next to decades old dry wood. Fewer holes in the drywall too.
Uponor is the brand I'm using with the Milwaukee expansion tool.
 

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
38,841
Reaction score
4,423
Points
113
Location
IL
I am confused why none of the quotes are specific to what type of PEX they use. I believe in letting professionals choose the materials they prefer to work with, but I also don't want a mix of fittings/pipe.
I suggest you go to Authorized Uponor distributors and retailers | Uponor (uponor-usa.com) and plug in your zip. Then contact a local supply house that comes up in the search, and ask who uses the materials you prefer.

A lot of people use copper and don't get pinholes. I suspect your water may be more corrosive than most. There are ways to treat for that.

Also, if your water is at all corrosive, I suggest you go with "EP" (engineered plastic) fittings. One of the big F1960 advantages is that the plastic fitting ID is much bigger than the plastic fittings used with crimp and clamp.

You may have been piped with type M (red ink) pipe. That is the thinnest of the 3 common types. Many areas allow that.
 
Last edited:
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks