Bathroom reno questions

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Leejosepho

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crossthreaded said:
I think at this point I am planning on just ripping it out down to the joists and starting over. It will be a big pain to run the new wet vent without tearing up the floors.

Even though a single layer would have been odd, I did not previously realize you already have 1-1/2" of the 1x3 t-g, and I would caution you about trying to rip all of that out unless you are *quite* sure your walls do not sit on it. In the original part of my old and small house, the main-floor studs (four outside walls and one center wall only) actually run through the floor decking and sit on the basement walls, and I suppose that would make it possible to completely remove the decking. But, I would doubt that is your own case.

Along with doing whatever you truly must to deal with your venting, I would again suggest you simply repair the bad spot, re-nail your existing decking and add your "hardi backer" or whatever and tile. Having also worked as a mechanic in years past, I do understand your "complete overhaul" thinking. However, and unless that entire floor is rotten, I would definitely not attempt that here.
 

Geniescience

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Before you go any farther, please tell us what you have planned. The layers under the tile.

Have you fully understood Jim's post? He says plywood is absolutely
necessary, and that without it the new tiles will crack.

David
 

crossthreaded

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leejosepho said:
Even though a single layer would have been odd, I did not previously realize you already have 1-1/2" of the 1x3 t-g, .


I only have 3/4" of the t&g, which is already ripped up, and then 3/4" 2x8's under that. the top layer of t and g would have been a pain to cut out and replace and it was pretty nasty over by the toilet flange so I ripped it all out. there is about 3 2x10 boards in the corner around the flange that will need to be taken up and then the other boards to replace the drain then put the boards back down and then put down 3/4 ply on top of that. that will be 6/4 of subfloor. depending on the height I will use the 1/2 hardi or go get 1/4.

we got it all ripped out today including the shower and the floor. we will get the plumbing done tomorrow then get the sub put down and then set the tub.


so the new floor will be 2x8 boards, 3/4 ply, hardi, then tile.

I will run some screws through the boards into the joists, and then the ply gets screwed down to the boards and not the joists right?
 

Geniescience

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Two layers of ply?

i don't have time to go back and reread every word everyone posted so far. I thin I must be missing something, because this post above is not clear to me.

If you are saying that will have two layers of 3/4" ply (which might be how you go the 6/4" figure), then Yes you only screw the first layer into the joists and then the second layer into the first while avoiding the joists this time.

Using 1/4" CBU is less expensive and takes less height. To me that is a no-brainer since you are trying not to build up the floor height.

New Q: have you already checked joist length and deflection?

David
 

crossthreaded

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geniescience said:
New Q: have you already checked joist length and deflection?

David

yeah it was good for ceramic or natural stone.

it will be 3/4 of boards layed diagonally(not ply) then a 3/4 piece of ply.

I'm seeing now that I will have to use 1/4 hardi....I guess I was just trying to get out of carrying all that stuff back down the stairs.
 

Jadnashua

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1/2" plywood over the planks is adequate - more won't hurt, but it isn't really necessary for a ceramic (this is for ceramic and not stone, isn't it?). Using a membrane can also minimize the buildup height. Ditra (www.schluter.com) adds about 1/8" verses a little over 1/4" for cbu, is easier to carry home and install. Depending on where you buy Ditra (HD has it in small rolls) you can potentially order just what you need on-line, check the store in www.johnbridge.com for a decent price. If you can find it locally, the delta for the material may offset the shipping, but it depends.

The specs for Ditra say you can install it over a single layer of 5/8" ply, but most people really like to use more. WIth your planks, the minimum over them that works is 1/2", though.
 

Markts30

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Word of caution...
Read up on heights of closet flanges before setting yours...
Make sure you can set the new flange hieght on top of the finished tile...
(attach it to the pipe after tile install...)
Otherwise you are going to have a whole 'nother headache later ... LOL
 

crossthreaded

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markts30 said:
Word of caution...
Read up on heights of closet flanges before setting yours...
Make sure you can set the new flange hieght on top of the finished tile...
(attach it to the pipe after tile install...)
Otherwise you are going to have a whole 'nother headache later ... LOL


what height should it be at relative to the finished floor?

I was planning on setting it the same as it is now and making up for the added hardibacker and tile with spacers.
 

crossthreaded

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here is the plumbing right now. I really don't know what is supposed to come next, I will be researching to figure it out. I have an idea but not sure how to make it all work together.
 

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Jadnashua

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The ideal way to install a toilet flange is after the finished flooring is installed. This takes some planning, since many of the flanges require an opening larger than the pipe sticking up so they can slide down around the pipe. Then, when fastening the flange, you go through the finished flooring into the subfloor. If you do this, and the flange is sitting tight to the floor, any standard toilet will fit (assuming you placed it properly - the notches are where they are supposed to be and it is the prescribed distance from the wall).

With tile, it is often easier to notch it where the flange mounting screws will go so you don't have to try to drill them later.
 

crossthreaded

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so I should just center the pipe up where the flange is supposed to go, ok.

now as for the shower I was planning on running a 2" sanitary tee, into a ptrap then a 90 to the 2" run across the joists, then join it into the 4x4x2 wye right behind the closet 90 for the flange. is this right?
 

Geniescience

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4 pictures

hi crossthreaded

you might want to post these four pictures in a new thread appealing for drain planning plumbing help. There' a lot to fix, and a lot to learn. I cannot predict how close you can get your new installation up to Code.

david
 
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