Why is the outside pipe spaced from the wall?

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Boofuss

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We had our roof replaced. The falling debris (shingles) broke an outside pipe (at the elbow) that was used to drain our water softener system. If I don't fix it, the pipe points downward against the outside wall. Seems like it would drain fine. But I would guess there was a reason it was plumbed to space away from the wall by a couple feet. And, I can't tell if the "fitting" on the end is special or something has broken off there also. So, do I need to fix this?
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Yes, you should fix that. You don't want the waste water just dumping against the side of your home. It will eventually get through the paint.

If I were to install it, I would likely have the pipe lower to the ground and dump onto a splash block that directs the water away from your foundation.
 

MaxBlack

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Yup that pipe intended to carry the water away from your foundation just like you have gutters to do the same thing. Don't want water to pool against your foundation and possibly leak-thru.
 

Boofuss

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Got it, I'll fix it. And it doesn't need to come out at a 90 degree angle, right? I have a 45 degree fixture and I'll point it down closer to the ground (and put a splash block as suggested).
 

Bannerman

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PVC pipe will typically breakdown due to UV exposure. Painting the pipe will provide UV protection, but repainting will likely be required every few years.

Where is the softener located in relation to the drain pipe?

If the softener is located at an elevation that is significantly higher than the drain line discharge level, then a vacuum breaker maybe advisable at the highest point in the discharge line, to allow air to enter to prevent negative pressure resulting from the syphon effect of the lower discharge height, from potentially causing the media tank to collapse.

For a similar situation, see post #12 in the following thread: https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/water-softner-backwash-is-this-okay.93391/
 
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