Which BrassCraft To Get - Replacing Valves

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Johndoejohndoes

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I'm looking to remove and replace the cheap Accor FlowTite Shut Off Valves at my toilets/sink and I'm trying to determine which BrassCraft will suit me best.

I have PEX in my house - does anyone have recommendations on which part I should get from Home Depot?

I'm not very experienced so I may be buying the parts and asking a plumber to come out and replace all 10...unless you think I can accomplish myself.

Thanks
 

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Jadziedzic

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I'd stay away from the Brasscraft valves sold at Home Depot - they're low-end "quarter-turn" non-ball valves. Look into Dahl brand valves, well-made by our neighbor to the north for not much more than the HD junk; Supply House (.com) is one source.
 

Johndoejohndoes

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Jadnashua

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The issue with Sharkbite fittings (including their valves) is that they use SS teeth to hold it in position on the pipe/tubing. This means that it can turn on the pipe, unlike one that is soldered on, or a properly installed compression fitting. That doesn't make them bad, and in the case of a toilet, it won't be used on a daily basis, so you probably won't ever run into a problem. When turning the valve on/off, just be conscious of the fact that you want to avoid also turning it on the pipe.
 

Johndoejohndoes

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That is a good valve if you will have enough PEX for it to grab onto.
The issue with Sharkbite fittings (including their valves) is that they use SS teeth to hold it in position on the pipe/tubing. This means that it can turn on the pipe, unlike one that is soldered on, or a properly installed compression fitting. That doesn't make them bad, and in the case of a toilet, it won't be used on a daily basis, so you probably won't ever run into a problem. When turning the valve on/off, just be conscious of the fact that you want to avoid also turning it on the pipe.

Thanks! I was able to complete everything last night after some scary DIY moments.

I started with about 3 inches of PEX and had to keep cutting it because I wasn't getting a straight cut. I was finally able to get a perfect cut that was clean, smooth, straight and had no burs...with only 1.75 inches remaining.

I snapped on the SharkBite Push Valve with the Brasscraft line attaching it to the toilet and turned on the water main and everything was working perfectly. Zero leaking.

Here's a picture of the final product (attached).

Question - Do you think I have any reason to worry about a leak/blowout after explaining everything? I've read great reviews about the Sharkbite Push Valve online but other experienced plumbers (on other forums) have mixed reviews. Just wanted to make sure I can rest easy when I'm away from home since it's been 12 hours and everything has been working perfectly.

Thanks!
 

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Jadnashua

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If you follow the instructions and mark the depth, then push the Sharkbite on so that it is fully seated, it should be fine. You can run into problems if the pipe end is not true or there are sharp edges that would either prevent it from being fully pushed on or damaging the o-ring, but if it's fully seated and doesn't leak, it should last forever.
 

Johndoejohndoes

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If you follow the instructions and mark the depth, then push the Sharkbite on so that it is fully seated, it should be fine. You can run into problems if the pipe end is not true or there are sharp edges that would either prevent it from being fully pushed on or damaging the o-ring, but if it's fully seated and doesn't leak, it should last forever.
Thanks! Since it's PEX did I need to deburr it since I did a clean cut? I purchased this cutter (http://m.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-1-in-ProPEX-Tubing-Cutter-48-22-4202/205482438#) and was able to do a perfect cut. It was straight, smooth, and symmetrical...so I didn't deburr.

I didn't deburr because I previously attempted to using the SharkBite tool and it seemed to make it rougher...and sometimes pieces of plastic started splintering out.

I was reading another thread and it seems like they just recommend a clean cut vs. deburring when using PEX. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/deburring-pex-491698/#post4153042). So based on that advice I went with the straight cut.

Just thought I'd ask your feedback and what your thoughts were. Thanks!
 

CountryBumkin

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Deburring not necessary on PEX unless you see/feel some roughness due to a bad cutter blade. I have never had to smooth a PEX edge. I'm not a professional, but I cut a lot of PEX doing my house replumbing.
Cutting PEX is not like cutting copper where there will be a ridge created from the cutting process that needs to be removed.
 
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