What A/C in new construction?

Discussion in 'HVAC Heating & Cooling' started by mc_1_2_3, Jun 8, 2008.

  1. mc_1_2_3

    mc_1_2_3 New Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Occupation:
    Biomedical Equipment Technician
    Location:
    Western Pennsylvania
    Hello, I am currently building a new house. Ranch style, 1650 sq ft, radiant floor heat in basement and main floor. I plan to at least install the duct work for central A/C while I am roughing the house in, get it under the insulation in the attic. I am looking for suggestions on what type of system to install. I live in Western Pennsylvania, so the cooling season isn't too long, but it will be 90 today and for the next few days. When it is 90 here, it is HUMID. Some have suggested that the high flow, small diameter duct is the best way to go. Sure would make installation easier. I would like to place the openings in the ceiling.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks,
    Mark
     
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Occupation:
    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
    Location:
    New England
    A/C ducts in the ceiling is more comfortable than trying to push cold air up from the lower wall, or floor, a common problem when the system is designed for heat with a/c as an afterthought. Using a high-speed, small outlet system still requires a decent sized main trunk, so except for the smaller outlets (which are nice and easier to hide), I'm not sure it buys you all that much. Either, properly sized, would work.
     
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  4. alleycat

    alleycat New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2004
    Location:
    Illinois
    another thing to think about - where you locate the condenser. Ours is on the back patio and when the AC is on it's LOUD, making sitting on the patio pretty unpleasant (of course, if the AC is on it usually means sitting outside is unpleasant anyway, but....)
     
  5. alternety

    alternety Like an engineer

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2006
    Location:
    Washington
    Water to water ground coupled heat pump. An air to water exchanger for cooling. Replaces heating and cooling systems. Check prices (quite high) and decide if electricity at the COP of the unit is likely to be cheaper now and in the future. If you can answer what energy costs will be in the future (say tomorrow or next week), let me know. I will get into energy futures (which I have a nagging suspicion is responsible for at least some of the excessive cost).
     
  6. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    One possibility to consider...is what is called ductless mini-split. Check websites for Mitsubishi, Friedriech, and LG. A condensing unit goes outside and connects to a small wall mounted air handler inside. No ductwork. You can get multi-zone units, meaning one outdoor unit supports 2 to 4 indoor wall units. All you have to run is the copper line sets.

    This type system may be appropriate for you. They also come in heat pump versions, so in the spring and fall, you could take advantage of that feature instead of firing up the boiler.
     
  7. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Occupation:
    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
    Location:
    New England
    Many of the split systems come with precharged lines that connectd similar to air hoses, so installation is pretty easy. It's nice to be able to zone things, and this is one of the easiest ways to do it.
     
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