Small bathroom - non-standard size tub remodel

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Jeremytl

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I could use some advice. We decided it is high time to make some improvements to our main bath, which is pretty small at only 4' x 9'. Our budget is very limited, roughly $1500 to $2000. Part of the project will be tiling the floor. The big part of the project is to replace the tub. I can do the demo but I'm willing to pay for someone to install the new one and tile the surround. My questions are concerning the size of the tub. I'm pretty sure it is a standard size 30" x 60". Is there such a thing as a 28.5" wide tub? That is the measurement I get pulling a tape from the wall but I'm thinking the other 1.5" is inside the wall. The problem is that the depth of the cutout is not a full 30". See how the existing tub tapers to a more narrow measurement to fit? All of the tubs I have priced priced at the big box stores will stick out from the edge of the existing wall.

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I will take a sledgehammer to the cast iron tub to remove it. But I'm just unsure of the tub dimensions.
 
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Terry

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You're going to be way, way more than your budget on that.

The smallest tub is 30", which the wall board and tile will cover some of that.
Extend the wall where needed, even if it's just a corner board.

If you take a sledge to that, cover it with plastic first. That sharp glass stuff is like scrapnel when it explodes off the cast. You want gloves, eye protection and containment.
 

Jadnashua

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The only way to do what you want in that budget would be to do it yourself. Anyone willing to do it for your price is highly suspect in their ability to do it right, which means problems later on (probably quickly), and paying to redo things.

Just materials will cost a good portion of your budget by the time you replace the plumbing, and I assume a new vanity and sink as well. The materials could easily cost many multiples of what your budget is, but there are lots of less expensive options. You do tend to get what you pay for in materials as long as you don't stray into one of the fu-fu designer brands which tend to cost a fortune for their style, verses something equally as functional for much less.

Before you consider tile on the floor of the room, you should assess the structural construction of the room. What is the makeup of the subflooring and the structural joists? How flat is the floor? Is it level (doesn't have to be, but it's nice - it must be flat to tile, though). Things add up...just a couple of sheets of plywood, by the time you get the fasteners and construction adhesive could approach $100. Then, a tiling substrate, thinset, screws, joint reinforcement tape, tile, grout, maybe a profile. Some way to cut the tile - if you don't have a wetsaw, renting one can cost $50/day or more. Then, the trowels, grout float, buckets, not counting the tub, new drain assembly, new valve, vanity, sink, faucet, cbu backer, sealant, etc...Tile can cost anywhere from $1/sqft to over $10 easily. If you want any special trim tiles, they are usually quite expensive compared to the field tiles. You'll want a good drill motor to be able to mix up the mortar and a mixing paddle for it (not a wimpy 1/4" thing, either).

There are people here that can help with that, but your budget is going to be REALLY tight, if possible at all. You certainly won't be able to splurge on anything, but you can improve on what you have. If you're planning on a new toilet, you need to budget at least a couple hundred dollars for one that will be reliable and work well. If you're lucky, you may be able to get a water economy rebate for installing a new toilet, and that should help. A vanity top with a built-in bowl can be fairly cheap. Avoid valves from house brand, Chinese sourced parts. You may never be able to find replacement parts for them.
 

hj

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quote; Is there such a thing as a 28.5" wide tub?

Not any more. In the 50s that WAS the standard size, but then FHA started requiring a 30" tub and there was no reason to continue making the narrower ones. Yours must be one of the old ones, because there would NEVER be 1 1/2" of tub buried in the wall.
 

Jeremytl

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quote; Is there such a thing as a 28.5" wide tub?

Not any more. In the 50s that WAS the standard size, but then FHA started requiring a 30" tub and there was no reason to continue making the narrower ones. Yours must be one of the old ones, because there would NEVER be 1 1/2" of tub buried in the wall.
the house was built in 1963 so ???
 

Jeremytl

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Here's an idea. What if I buy the 30" tub from Lowe's, and notch into the studs in the wall to accommodate that extra 2" of width? Its not like its a load bearing wall, plus I could put some studs in flipped sideways to help support the band above. Thoughts on that?
 

hj

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Probably because there is a doorway at the end of the wall and that would have to be made smaller also, which means they are getting into a very serious remodeling project.
 

Jeremytl

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Probably because there is a doorway at the end of the wall and that would have to be made smaller also, which means they are getting into a very serious remodeling project.
Exactly!
Here is a draft of what I had in mind. I really don't see why I can't make it work.

jeromy-08.jpg
 
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ShowerDude

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I cant stop laughing at your Budget ( aka cost of some of the materials..)

Save a few bucks for injurys from sledgehammering tub and shards., and possible Lung/mold remediation.

from what i see your alcove has a inch or 2 to spare already. ( beadboard wall to tub corner.)

Cacher chicks got a simple easy point if need be.
 

Jadnashua

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In theory, your tiled wall could end up nearly flush with the sidewall of the tub, but it would look weird. Typically, on the wall, you'd use some plastic as a vapor barrier, then 1/2" cbu, then your tile. With such a wide area behind the wall to the tiling flange, you might want to rethink that a bit and consider a surface applied waterproofing, either liquid or fabric. Or, you could use something like KerdiBoard instead of the cbu, and then use some KerdiFix and KerdiBand to seal things off.
 
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