Semi-finished basement Utility/Laundry Venting

Discussion in 'Plumbing Code Questions' started by ADK_MechETech, Mar 9, 2020.

  1. ADK_MechETech

    ADK_MechETech New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2020
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Hi all, long time lurker, first time poster (just registered). If this is in the wrong place, I apologize and mods please move it to the appropriate sub-forum. I've referenced this forum many times in checking my work for code compliance, but this new project I want to make sure I am on the right track before even pulling permits. I'm still in the planning stage.

    I have a single floor ranch with full unfinished basement. With plans for a family in the near future, I need to free up one of the two extra bedrooms for a baby room. That means all my "toys" that make up my bedroom office need a new home. The laundry area that is currently located where the kitchen pantry also needs to go.

    The idea: Semi-finish the basement as a utility space (non-liveable) for the washer and dryer, as well as a shop area to contain all my crap. The walls will be sheetrock, but the ceiling will be left open for any future maintenance.

    I was originally planning to use a ventless pump like the Shellback, Hartell, or Everbilt ones readily available that attach directly to the bottom of a sink. The plan was to use the 2 bay commercial stainless sink I have to catch the washer's drain (with a filter) and have it pumped into the main line that is near where the laundry room will be. The line to the septic exits the foundation about 2 feet off the floor and I have easy access to put in a wye.

    I am second guessing myself and now thinking I should cut open the wall on the 1st floor and try to tie into the main vent stack or one from the 2nd bath that is nearby. That vent *should* be about 15 feet horizontally from where the vent would need to be for the sink and washer in the basement. I believe code says I need to tie into the 1st floor vent above the flood line of any fixture on the first floor right? Are there any restrictions on using Fernco couplings on vent lines?

    I guess I'm just looking for experience on using pumps like this and if I would be better off in the long run just running the vent line. Obviously one is far less work and expense than the other.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2020
  2. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Liberty makes a pump for sinks and washers. The vent could be run to the upstairs. Ferncos are okay as long as they are the shielded style. The ones with the metal wrap to prevent the pipes from shifting. The all rubber ones deform pretty badly over time.

    https://www.libertypumps.com/Product/Model-404
     
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  4. ADK_MechETech

    ADK_MechETech New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2020
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Thanks for the link. There are definitely plenty of options requiring a vent. I guess I'm just looking for an excuse to not do it the hard way. This isn't our forever house. It's more of a 5 year plan and I'm not interested in putting more work/money than necessary into it than I am going to be able to enjoy. If I can get by without tearing apart the sheetrock on the 1st floor that is definitely my preference.
     
  5. Whiplash55

    Whiplash55 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2020
    Location:
    New York
    I have a similar problem. I'm installing a laundry/bathroom combo. It my sewer line is a hanging sewer 4 1/2 feet off the floor. I have a standpipe for the washer that works fine but can only be 9 inches above the p-trap. I'm in the process of putting in a basement kitchen on the other side which needs to have a pump for the sink and dishwasher but have nowhere to tie a vent into. The toilet has its own pump and the sink ties into the toilet. Any suggestions?
     

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  6. ADK_MechETech

    ADK_MechETech New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2020
    Location:
    Connecticut
    You should probably create your own thread for this specific question.

    There is no way I would use one of the ventless pumps I mentioned for a kitchen sink. I don't think you have much of an option except putting in a box and finding a vent upstairs to tie into.
     
  7. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    The washer p-trap is done wrong. The vent comes off the top of the pipe, not below it.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. ADK_MechETech

    ADK_MechETech New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2020
    Location:
    Connecticut
    ***Edit*** - So I realized there is the 404L which has a 2" inlet which indirectly answers my question. No, reducing the 2" pipe to go to the normal 404 is not ok. My venting question still stands though. Should I vent the traps in addition to the sump?


    So I have pretty much decided to do this the "right" way and tie into my main stack vent. The total developed length is less than 150ft and there will be a washing machine and double bay commercial sink. This would be 6dfu if my understanding is correct. I have not decided if I will plumb the two sink drains together or do them with individual traps yet. So the washing machine standpipe needs to be 2" per code. A 1-1/2" vent would suffice, but 2" would basically make the length unlimited.

    The sink and washer are adjacent to each other separated by a wall. I can easily run a single 2" line to serve all 3 fixtures using wye fittings. The Liberty 404 has an inlet of 1-1/2" and will be within a few feet of everything. Is that okay, reducing the 2" drain to 1-1/2" to enter the sump? Something doesn't seem right about that. Do I need an additional vent other than the one that vents the liberty sump? If no additional vent is required, would it still be a good idea to have a circuit vent that ties back in to the vent off the sump above the flood line?

    Rough Sketch of what I am thinking...
    venting.JPG
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2020
  9. ADK_MechETech

    ADK_MechETech New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2020
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Since I'm sure my post above was quite confusing, the image below is basically what I want to do. In place of the drain stack would be the 404 pump, and instead of the relief vent connecting to the drain line with a wye it would be connected to the sump vent port.

    venting.JPG
     
  10. ADK_MechETech

    ADK_MechETech New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2020
    Location:
    Connecticut
    So I got word today that CT is shutting down all non-essential business. Now I have some unexpected free time I decided to start exploring.

    Below is a picture of the vertical vent from my 1st floor bathroom that only serves the shower. This is well above flood line of all the fixtures on this floor. It goes to the attic and transitions to a ~3" stack that exits the roof. The sink and toilet in this bathroom are on the opposite wall and I *Think* it ties into the 3" portion of the stack in the attic. It's covered with blown in cellulose that I don't want to disturb unless absolutely necessary. I believe this still puts me under the dfu count for a 2" vent for the developed length I need. (about 30 feet).

    I can use a standard Tee fitting then a 90 here right?
    New_Vent.jpg
     
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