Replacing shutoff valve on CPVC

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Cabin_Mama

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Hi all! How would I go about replacing a shutoff valve for a toilet when I have CPVC pipe in the wall? I did my homework, watched a bunch of YouTube videos, and I see how these valves come off. But what if the joint is glued? All other visible shutoff valves in the house have the telltale orange or purple CPVC goo around the join. But of course, I can't see on this one. Won't I just break the whole arrangement if I apply any force? Attached pic. Any advice is welcomed!

0611220631.jpg
 

Weekend Handyman

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Hi all! How would I go about replacing a shutoff valve for a toilet when I have CPVC pipe in the wall? I did my homework, watched a bunch of YouTube videos, and I see how these valves come off. But what if the joint is glued? All other visible shutoff valves in the house have the telltale orange or purple CPVC goo around the join. But of course, I can't see on this one. Won't I just break the whole arrangement if I apply any force? Attached pic. Any advice is welcomed!

I am not a pro.

I don't know why they would glue a compression fitting.

I would be a little nervous replacing that valve because old CPVC gets brittle.

I think there is a good chance you will break the pipe, so you should plan for that. Do you have access from behind the wall?

Make sure you hold back on the valve body when you turn take the nut off to avoid stressing the pipe.

I am not sure if there will also be a risk of crushing the pipe when you tighten it back up ... would be be interesting to hear from one of the pros who deals with CPVC on a regular basis.
 

SteveW

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Maybe it's the angle, but to me this doesn't look like CPVC. It appears you have a compression fitting on a copper pipe?
 

Jeff H Young

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It absolutely is compression joint but I don't see a hint of copper or CPVC I've seen both
I've changed out angle stops and left old ferrule and nut, I've been pretty lucky in these situations , cutting it back and using a shark bite was my fix before as well. I'd have a brass craft stop and try the easy way first might get lucky just changing the stop without cutting anything
 

SteveW

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I understand that it would be most likely that, if the rest of the house is plumbed w CPVC, that this bathroom would be, too. But when I look at this pic, the very small surface area of the supply pipe between the escutcheon and the valve does not look like plastic to me. Looks like chrome. Am I missing something?
 

Jeff H Young

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I can't detect but it could be another material There might be a sliver that appears shiny but inconclusive to me.
 

Cabin_Mama

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I understand that it would be most likely that, if the rest of the house is plumbed w CPVC, that this bathroom would be, too. But when I look at this pic, the very small surface area of the supply pipe between the escutcheon and the valve does not look like plastic to me. Looks like chrome. Am I missing something?
I know, that's what confused me too. I took a pic of another toilet valve in the house with the same thing but a much longer stub-out. It appears to be some sort of metal adapter glued to the PVC. Oddly, the nut and "adapter" or whatever seem to be one piece. So thinking I'd apply the force to the valve itself to remove it, and hold the nut steady. Does this make sense?
But how would I get the ferrule out of a stationary nut? And get a new one on? I don't have room to cut off any pipe, as you saw in the original pic. I'm starting to think I want to leave this to a pro.

0613221543a.jpg
 

Terry

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That shutoff is a "glue-on"
You can cut the pipe behind it and either install a new one by:
Glue
Compression
Sharkbite

Three options, but not pulling this one off.

anglestop-cpvc-2.jpg


anglestop-cpvc.jpg
 
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Reach4

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I was wondering if this was a CPVC to FIP adapter.
647-cg2-4.jpg
If that was the case, you could unscrew the valve and screw on another.

However Terry's thought makes a lot more sense.

What letters and numbers are on your valve? Maybe the maker has a solution for you.

What is on the other side of the wall?
 

Terry

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I had never heard of a glue-on compression fitting-- you learn something every day on this site!
It's not a compression fitting. That particular one gets glued on. This one was glued but snapped of while snugging the bonnet.

cpvc-stop-broken.jpg
 
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SteveW

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Yep -- I can't get over the sight of that fitting not being compression!
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Buy a new CPVC valve of the same brand.

The glued on portion sits under the "compression" nut and has a shoulder that retains the nut and applies pressure to compress the gasket against the valve.

Leave the nut and flange glued on and replace the valve. They should just thread together. Maybe you might have to replace the rubber gasket, but typically they are still good.
 

Jeff H Young

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Yep I believe as Tuttles says , the anglestop is basically a 5/8 or 1/2" CTS compression stop the nut either has something built in or a rubber inside not sure which but carefully holding you can unscrew the angle stop. and I'm not against a shark bite here either .
 

Jeff H Young

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I think it comes apart but not 100 percent sure. obviously its glued on but that is an adapter to a standard anglestop, whether it's epoxied on or something permanent in nature would be a possibility but my guess is that there is a chance it will come apart. I'd take a chance because as short as it is and cabin mama says it won't pull out other option is bust open wall.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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I think it comes apart but not 100 percent sure. obviously its glued on but that is an adapter to a standard anglestop, whether it's epoxied on or something permanent in nature would be a possibility but my guess is that there is a chance it will come apart. I'd take a chance because as short as it is and cabin mama says it won't pull out other option is bust open wall.
The chrome nut acts similarly to a copper compression nut. But instead of a brass ferrule that compresses onto the pipe and holds the nut in place to apply force to the valve. The CPVC version has a glued on flange.

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