Replacement Gas Line Installation

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sampep

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Hi, I'm a DIY-er who just replaced my 40 year old 30' galvanized gas line with new black pipe. I have a few questions about the process:

1. I saw some people say to not use yellow Teflon. Instead, only use dope, as the Teflon can tear and break appliances. I didn't see this until after I did the re-pipe...I used yellow Teflon and no dope. Is it worth re-doing the whole job with dope only?

yellow-tape-1.jpg


2. I did a pressure test and it held. The inspector is coming soon to verify. I cut and capped the old line so there's still about a foot of it connected to the meter. Am I able to disconnect this and connect my new line to the meter myself or do I need the gas company to do this? I haven't been in touch with my gas company since I shutoff the gas myself while I cut and capped the old line. If so, would I use a union to connect the new line? My city says "unions are allowed downstream of appliance shutoff valves, meter locations, and immediately downstream of building shutoff valves."

3. Isn't there a risk of a leaky connection between the meter and new line? The pressure test doesn't cover that one. How do I make sure that final connection is good to go before turning the gas back on?

4. My city says "metallic gas piping is NOT allowed outdoors or within 6 inches of the ground. Exception: Piping with factory coating with approved materials is acceptable for burial in the ground." My black pipe sticks out of my house siding about 6 inches to connect with the meter. What type of paint or spray do I need to use to make this acceptable for outdoors?

Thank you!
 

Terry

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1) Yellow tape is fine for gas. I normally just use pipe dope, but you do have both options. I would leave what you have installed.

2) A capped line needs to be connected to the meter at some point. There is a union at the meter.

3) Checking for a leak outside, or inside can be done with soapy water. I sometimes take a spray bottle and add liquid soap to the water.
 

John Gayewski

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We use any paint that is meant for steel and matches the color.

The tape thing is silly. Homeowners generally don't know how to tape joints so someone is saying don't do it. We tape and dope EVERY THREADED JOINT.

The last connection must be a union if you started on the house first.

Use leak detector to check the joints. Call the utility company they will tell you how they want you to connect to their meter. Ours makes a plumber with a license do it. They (Generally) will do a no flow test for leaks also. Meaning you turn all of the service valves off and they turn it on and look at the meter to see if there's flow.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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I use one or the other dope or tape on threaded connections. Thread tape can get into the piping if the installer is careless with how they apply the tape but if its installed on the threads only and not sticking over the end of the pipe and is applied so that it doesn't come off when the pipe is threaded then how can the tape get inside of the pipe? A drip leg / sediment trap at an appliance is designed to catch incidental bits of dust and debris from getting into the appliance.

The final connections have to be made after the pressure test at some point, just how things work. The connection to the meter itself is a type of union fitting that allows you to thread on the fittings to that point and use the union nut to make the final connection to the meter. There can be several fittings that are installed after that point and as one inspector pointed out to me, If it leaks, You have to fix it. You can detect a leak in a charged gas line easily with a leak detection fluid as pointed out above or a mechanical gas detector.

We paint all of our exterior pipe the same gray as the meter or with a color matching paint that the homeowner provides.
 
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