Replace compression fitting with soldered copper adapter?

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Archimedes

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Hi Everyone. I'm in the early stages of a bathroom and kitchen remodel. Right now I'm deciding on the shutoff valves. The house was built in the 50's and has 1/2 copper pipe going into the kitchen and bathroom. There were originally soldered shutoffs that I replaced with compression fittings a few years ago. I've pretty much decided on Dahls, though KT Brasscrafts are still in the running.
Here's where I'm a little lost. I'd prefer not to sweat new valves on (I 'd prefer something "easy" to take apart and replace should a problem arise), though I'd like something more "permanent" than compression (even though I've had no problems with the compressions I've put on, I'd feel better with a soldered connection). Which brings me to the third choice, sweat a wrot 1/2 MIP copper threaded adapter to the pipe from the wall then add a 1/2 angle stop (this seems permanent and easy to take apart). Is this an acceptable choice? So far all the FIP valves say they're for iron pipe, but I wasn't sure if adding the copper adapter takes care of that problem by making the pipe threaded. Thanks in advance!
 

Reach4

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So far all the FIP valves say they're for iron pipe, but I wasn't sure if adding the copper adapter takes care of that problem by making the pipe threaded.
FIP means iron pipe thread. Same as FIPT and FPT.

If the pipe is not buggered up, use compression as James Henry says. Soldering can accommodate flaws. To put your mind at rest, you might look up "ferrule pullers". Not that you will need one, but you may be relieved to know they exist. Tightening compression takes more force than I thought. Stop worrying about crushing the pipe with short wrenches. It's better to apply a bit of pipe dope or other lube to the ferrule and threads. That decreases the need for high torque in an awkward position, but it can still be a challenge to your bare hands.
 
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Terry

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I've been installing compression stops for decades. I would never waste my time soldering stops on. If I want to replace a stop later on, which I do very often, I use a sleeve puller. It takes me no time at all with the right tools.

 
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Archimedes

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Thanks for the input everyone! I think this means I'll likely be going with compressions. I initially had mixed feeling on it, but from the responses, it sounds like compression is probably the best bet. I'll let you know how it goes (though that still won't be for a while), and if more questions come up!
 
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