Pressure Switch dilemma: 2wells 2 outputs

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Dpwells

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When the water consumption flow rate is less than the flow rate the pump is capable of delivering, the CSV device will reduce the flow from the pump to match the consumption rate after the CSV. When flow from the pump is reduced, the pressure will increase so with yard hydrants located before the CSV, the hydrants will experience excessive water pressure which maybe 150 psi when only a small quantity of water is being consumed after the CSV.

For the pressure to the yard hydrants to be identical to the pressure delivered to the home fixtures, the hydrants will need to be plumbed after the CSV. Depending on the diameter and configuration of your well casing and supply piping, it is sometimes possible to install a CSV within the well casing or nearby to the well so every fixture after the CSV including the yard hydrants, will be supplied with constant pressure as controlled by the CSV.



A Cycle Sensor monitors the electrical power consumed by the pump. When the pump is moving the maximum amount of water possible, power consumption will be highest and will reduce as the flow rate is reduced or the height of the water within the well rises. If there is insufficient water remaining in the well to cause the pump to draw air, the amps will drop too low which will cause the Cycle Sensor to shut off the pump. Since a Cycle Sensor only monitors power consumption, the location of the yard hydrants will have no bearing on Cycle Sensor operation.
Thank you for such a concise and comprehrensive explanation. That cleared up all my misgivings regarding the hydrants.
 

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The 600' 1.5 hp pump's pressure switch has a 100psi closed cap in front of it, but the 200' 3/4 hp pump pressure switch cap is stamped 75 hp. Both 35 gal tanks are new, and I thought I had 100 psi on my old 200 foot tank.. Does that negatively affect water pressure in the house and can it easily be switched out for100 psi?
 

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The 600' 1.5 hp pump's pressure switch has a 100psi closed cap in front of it, but the 200' 3/4 hp pump pressure switch cap is stamped 75 hp. Both 35 gal tanks are new, and I thought I had 100 psi on my old 200 foot tank.. Does that negatively affect water pressure in the house and can it easily be switched out for100 psi?
I don't understand? But a 100 PSI tank should be fine with a 40/60 switch setting.
 

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I don't understand? But a 100 PSI tank should be fine with a 40/60 switch setting.
As the 40/60 is set up on the 200' well pressure tank would you agree that it should be 100psi rather than 75 to get maximum water pressure in the house?
 

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The 600' 1.5 hp pump's pressure switch has a 100psi closed cap in front of it, but the 200' 3/4 hp pump pressure switch cap is stamped 75 hp. Both 35 gal tanks are new, and I thought I had 100 psi on my old 200 foot tank.. Does that negatively affect water pressure in the house and can it easily be switched out for100 psi?
I know starting cap (capacitor). I know well cap (which are usually vented). I know "closed captions". What is the closed cap that you reference?
 

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Oh, sorry... it's the brass screw-on cap in left side of photo with "75 psi" etched into it.
IMG_1632.jpg
 

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That is a pressure relief valve. Many are adjustable. The purpose is to let cooling water flow if the pressure switch fails "on".

I don't think you have proposed going over 60 psi with your pressure switches.
 
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Dpwells

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That is a pressure relief valve. Many are adjustable.

But I don't think you have proposed going over 60 psi with your pressure switches.
Ok, that makes sense. I was thrown off when I saw one at 100 and the other at 75, not thinking they related to the gauge itself but to the tank. Now I clearly see that the gauge measures and regulates the actual tank pressure, thank you. In effect, it doesn't matter what each one is since as you stated, we are not going over 60.
 

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With a 40/60 pressure switch the relief valve needs to be set at 75 PSI. If the pressure switch sticks and the pump cannot shut off, your pump may not even be able to build 100 PSI to pop off a relief valve. The relief valve is not designed to protect your house plumbing from excess of 75 or 100 PSI, but to release some water to keep the pump from melting down when it cannot shut off as it should. With a 100 PSI relief valve you maybe buying a new pump if the pressure switch sticks closed. A 75 PSI relief valve would save the pump.
 

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With a 40/60 pressure switch the relief valve needs to be set at 75 PSI. If the pressure switch sticks and the pump cannot shut off, your pump may not even be able to build 100 PSI to pop off a relief valve. The relief valve is not designed to protect your house plumbing from excess of 75 or 100 PSI, but to release some water to keep the pump from melting down when it cannot shut off as it should. With a 100 PSI relief valve you maybe buying a new pump if the pressure switch sticks closed. A 75 PSI relief valve would save the pump.
So with the 600' well and 1.5 hp pump, I assume I need to have the 100 psi valve changed out to 75 psi. Odd that the well company which drilled the well and also recently installed the new pressure tank didn't think to put in 75 psi to begin with.
 

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The 600' deep with a 1 1/2hp submersible is wired with 10 gauge from well to pressure switch and with 10 gauge from pressure switch to breaker.

The 200' deep with a 3/4 hp submersible is wired with 12 gauge from well to pressure switch and 8 gauge (!) from pressure switch to breaker.

Do I need to replace the 8 gauge prior to wiring in Cycle Sensors for the two wells?
 

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With a 40/60 pressure switch the relief valve needs to be set at 75 PSI. If the pressure switch sticks and the pump cannot shut off, your pump may not even be able to build 100 PSI to pop off a relief valve. The relief valve is not designed to protect your house plumbing from excess of 75 or 100 PSI, but to release some water to keep the pump from melting down when it cannot shut off as it should. With a 100 PSI relief valve you maybe buying a new pump if the pressure switch sticks closed. A 75 PSI relief valve would save the pump.
No. A short piece of #12 is fine for both of those size pumps.
 

Reach4

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Do I need to replace the 8 gauge prior to wiring in Cycle Sensors for the two wells?
The Cycle Sensor gets wired in after the pressure switch, and before the control box if there is one.

I think you were maybe asking if the terminals on the Cycle Sensor can accept #8 AWG, and Valveman is saying to splice in a short piece of #12 that actually gets connected to the Cycle Sensor terminals. The splice would be in the box.
 
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Dpwells

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Running into a problem with the new 600' well. Colloidal clay is not clearing up to use in home. May wait for Spring to use well exclusively on sprinkler system. Are there any pitfalls, i.e. fissures closing, pump getting stuck in iron oxide slime, etc over the Northeast winter?
 
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