Mistaken flange ring for a flange, cut off top of closet bend, what options now?

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Taocost

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I thought it was a 3 inch flange inside a 4 inch pipe, but turns out it was a closet bend, which is part of the main plumbing for the house. A flange ring was used previously, which I could've just replaced if I were smarter, more patient, had more experience...live and learn.

So what are the options? The interior diameter is only 3 inches, should I get one of those twist flange types?
 

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Reach4

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Is the black ring fairly stable? A repair ring and wax may fix this. So search for "repair ring" , with the quotes, including trying the search box above. I am thinking that a repair ring with ears would be good. The Danco Hydroseat may also be a good choice for this.

Photos for posting should not have a towel/sheet to stop sewer smells, but I doubt that makes a difference in understanding the situation.
 

Taocost

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Would I have to screw either the repair ring or Hydroseat to the 'lips' of the black ring? Or screw it to the subfloor?

I am thinking hydroseat to the subfloor, and the black ring is stable enough.

Guess I'll have to try it out.

Also, I slightly saw through the black ring, have to think of a way to repair that to prevent leaks.

Thank you for the tips.
 

Reach4

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Screw into the subfloor via the finished floor.

If the black holds steady enough to meet the wax, there should not be a leak.

"Also, I slightly saw through the black ring, have to think of a way to repair that to prevent leaks"
I think you are saying that there is a hole in the black, and light passes thru. Yep, that is a big deal. Slab floor?
 

Taocost

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Yes, where the light passes through, but think tha'ts the only part that was sawed through. Can I just use culk to fill the gap or is there a better solution?

So the wax will stay in place, if I do : black ring < wax ring < hydroseat < wax ring < toilet...?

Re slab floor, if you mean is there slab floor underneath, none, its just vinyl sheet flooring > subfloor > PVC house pipes > basement and dirt.
 
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Reach4

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Normally no wax ring above the hydroseat.

I don't know what best to use for gap filling that plastic. I presume that the hole you are talking about is in the central part, and not the rim where the plastic has flared out horizontally.

Given that there is a basement below, putting in a new closet flange is practical. A plumber could do that very quickly, and it might take you two weeks if you are like me.

This gets me wondering why you have black plastic over PVC. Could that black be some kind of insert that will lift out?
 

Taocost

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I might not term this all correctly since just learning all of this, but the black plastic ring is part of the house plumbing.

If you look at the first picture, you can see underneath the subflooring, there is another pipe on the left side, that one is coming from the sink. the direction of the flow to the main pipes is towards the right.

I am thinking this flange may also be a solution, a 6in long flange that fit insit 3in piipes. https://www.homedepot.com/p/JONES-S...fits-Inside-3-in-Sch-40-Pipe-C50308/315587070

Again, really appreciate you!
 

Eman85

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I'm not a plumber. It looks like your home is plumbed with ABS instead of PVC. Is all of the drain pipes black? Instead of rigging if it's easy to reach the pipes underneath I would cut it all out and do it right with a proper flange.
 

Taocost

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Yes I think you're right, its ABS, instead of PVC.

By 'but it all out' do you mean cut it down just below the sawing?

I also just picked up Oatey 3in twist-n-set, which would hopefully by-pass the sawed portion...hoping that may work, but let me know if I am off on that.
 

Taocost

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Best I can do as the area is not accessible, but pic with red arrow shows the bathroom pipes coming out. Second pic just for additional info.
 

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Reach4

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The toilet is served by the big pipe in the upper left corner of the red arrow picture. It looks to me as if it would be to cut part of the horizontal away, and insert a closet bend. This would give you a 4 inch riser, and the waste would be reduced to 3 inch to join the 3 inch pipe.

There are a lot of available choices for closet flanges. Some are compression, and do no use glue at the actual closet flange.

That Hydroseat will do the job, but you have an opportunity to make changes.
 

Taocost

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Hey Reah4, you're pretty much spot on, the 4 inch riser was captured by a flange ring, that's what I mistook as a normal 3in flange going into the 4incn riser...turns out no flange, just ring.
 

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Decided to go with the compression route, installed a Oatey 3in twist-n-set, which gives about almost 3in of inside diameter for outlet into the main pipes. Think it should be alright.

It's level horizontally, but not north to south. I put a Drake over it, and it did wobble a bit when I pressed on one side. Maybe because I need to screw it down, or possibly need shims later.
 

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Reach4

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I would prefer a closet flange with a metal ring, but if it is a compression flange, that becomes less critical.

For the toilet, place the shims without wax, and make sure there is no wiggle. Lift the toilet, drop the wax, and drop the toilet. The point is that you don't want to un-compress wax. If you want to add shims later, you might consider a waxless seal. Those are normally resilient, and can deal with a later shim raising the bowl a bit.

Terry liked two shims at the back, and let the toilet be a slight bit leaning forward. That increases the water spot, but you want to avoid the water level intersecting with dangling parts, I think a list aft might be preferable.
 

John Gayewski

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I would use an inside pipe cutter and a pipe reamer to remove the toilet flange and reglue another one. This should be fairly easy.

If that's not possible you'd need a two piece repair flange to capture the black flange from moving downward. Then a hydro seat.
 
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