Master electrician protocol

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by Ken Tannenbaum1, Jan 20, 2019.

  1. Ken Tannenbaum1

    Ken Tannenbaum1 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2010
    Location:
    Catskill, NY
    Just built an addition which required a 100amp sub-panel. I provided the electrician a Square-D box I had used in other location for a couple of years before the old house was upgraded to 200amps. It had 16 breakers all previously working. SO the work gets done and every breaker was replaced by new ones. I understand the four that are AFCI's due to the codes here, but four of the breakers are UNUSED and he replaced even those. What's the deal? I suspect that's not necessary and feel ripped off, especially after he agreed that I would provide and install all the switches and receptacles and he'd check my work before the inspection. (I passed) It was CLEAR I needed to conserve the money.
     
  2. MASTERPLUMB777

    MASTERPLUMB777 In the Trades

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2007
    Occupation:
    Retired Master Plumber
    Location:
    Texas
    WHEN A BREAKER FAILS TO TRIP AND THE HOUSE BURNS DOWN KILLING A FAMILY MEMBER
    WHO PAYS YOU OR THE ELECTRICIAN ?
    REUSING THE BOX IS ONE THING, BUT THE BREAKERS ARE A LIFE SAFETY ISSUE !
     
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  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Occupation:
    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
    Location:
    New England
    Maybe the easier thing would have been to pop in some plastic covers over those unused breaker positions rather than installing new breakers. But, while breakers that will fit the box will probably be made for awhile, one never really knows, so having some spares can be handy.
     
  5. Ken Tannenbaum1

    Ken Tannenbaum1 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2010
    Location:
    Catskill, NY
    I understand precisely what you said, and agree, but there's more to his incompetence than I care to get into. I'm dealing with a few instances of incomplete work and the bill has been fully paid thinking it was all finished. No reason for anyone to respond.
     
  6. Ken Tannenbaum1

    Ken Tannenbaum1 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2010
    Location:
    Catskill, NY
    BTW, I believe he charged $40 for the useless breakers...that's four unused breakers. All 15 amp. Ridiculous. You're right, the inserts would have been the right thing. I've done so much construction I know a great deal about cost, plumbing, electric, carpentry...but I can't do major electric because of the license and the addition is being done to all local code. That's why I hired him but I'd never refer him. It'll all be resolved soon and I'm move on. Thanks again.
     
  7. Stuff

    Stuff Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    They sell special combo kits of new panels with breakers at a discount. Probably would have cost less in the end than re-using your old panel. Reusing an old panel also can take more time since the knock-outs may be in the wrong place or wrong size which need corrected.

    The more you say that you need to conserve money the more it tells someone that you are a problem customer. People that really need to conserve money don't build additions. He was already saving you thousands by agreeing to work with you and now you are complaining about a lousy $40.
     
    MASTERPLUMB777 likes this.
  8. Ken Tannenbaum1

    Ken Tannenbaum1 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2010
    Location:
    Catskill, NY
    Amazing how assumptions are made out of thin air. The "used" panel was as good as new, perfect in fact. This addition will top out at $70K when it's done. I did all the plumbing, added a hot water tank, a bathroom, kitchen with no help whatsoever. I know what I'm doing. My point is I have what I have because I'm careful, not because I give a rat's ass about $40. What bugs me about the electrician is that he nickeled and dimed me....as well as Ok'ing an apprentice's work that he did not CAREFULLY check before the drywall went up and now certain mistakes have to be rectified (which I believe he will make good on). I'm not a rich guy...and being a "problem customer"? You don't know jack about me. No one you know pays the same day they know what they owe. I respect the trades and they couldn't find a better customer. I'm done with this thread...I know what to do.
     
  9. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    I know plumbing, and a little about electrical. When the place I worked at in the 70's changed out my mothers electrical box, it was by the side of the business that was called Monarc Electric. Years later I added an addition, and at that time the inspector suggested I replace that box for safety reasons. We did. I'm good at listening sometimes. And I have heard some bad stories about electricity before. The husband of a high school friend died while working on a ladder and was electrocuted. He was an electrician. Plumbers have died while cutting water lines in crawl spaces and becoming the ground. I've received a few shocks myself, but here to laugh about it now. I know enough to know that what I know is a little and not enough for somethings.
     
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  10. Ken Tannenbaum1

    Ken Tannenbaum1 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2010
    Location:
    Catskill, NY
    What you do know or ought to know is the knowledge and pleasure this forum and the rest of your site provides to so many.
    Kudos to you for providing a great meeting place for the knowledgeable and the not as much.
     
    kevreh and MASTERPLUMB777 like this.
  11. ZZZ

    ZZZ New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Location:
    Missouri
    Local inspectors in this area never allow the use of used materials, no matter how good they look. It's a liability issue. They also don't allow unqualified (no trade license or city license) persons to do any electrical work, unless under the direct supervision of a licensed electrician. If a building burns down and someone is killed, who will be sued by the home owners insurance and the family of the deceased? The answer is the Electrical Contractor and the city's electrical inspectors. This is just the reasoning, you can take it or leave it, but you can't change it.
     
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  12. Ken Tannenbaum1

    Ken Tannenbaum1 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2010
    Location:
    Catskill, NY
    I agree with you and thank you for this but will "leave it" anyway. The reason is that the electrician did diligently inspect my work, a tiny part of the process, just installing switches and receptacles. Unlicensed does not mean a lack of knowledge. BTW, all the drywall is up and ready for paint. Last night I discovered two lines dedicated for the range and a microwave are dead. In checking for current than continuity, neither is connected in the box. The so-called master is coming here tomorrow to trace them. The reason for this travesty? He did not check the work of a rank apprentice who ran these lines AND told me to proceed with the drywall nevertheless. It's disgusting. Remember, he's been fully paid. He'll fix what's wrong he told me. While I believe him as we all make mistakes, it's below-pro work.
     
    MASTERPLUMB777 likes this.
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