Kitchen faucet nut won't budge for removal

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by learning, Aug 2, 2010.

  1. learning

    learning New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2010
    Location:
    MD
    I'm having an impossible time removing a 16-year-old Moen M7800 kitchen faucet. It's to be completely replaced, so it doesn't matter if it gets damaged in the process.

    Here's the main problem: rather than there being three lines (hot, cold, spray) that run through the central hole in the sink, there is a one central copper threaded line, with copper pipe extensions for all three connections soldered to the base of that.

    So there is only one rather large fixture attaching it to the underside of the sink, with a single metal washer and nut. The nut is about 1 3/8 - 1.5 inches diameter, and due to it's size, a basin wrench won't go around it. Due to it's age, it's corroded. It's in behind the center of a double sink, and hard to get a good grip with enough force with anything large enough to go around the nut.

    My local big box hardware store suggested spraying it with PB Blaster and giving it a go, even whacking it with a hammer to loosen it. I've done all that, but with no luck so far.

    Oh, the garbage disposal is out, so there is a bit more room to move around under there. It's being replaced too, so it's gone so I could get at the faucet.

    If I could just get this nut off, I could be on with the rest of the project! Has anyone else run into this? Thank you for any advice and suggestions.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 2, 2010
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    That doesn't look that corroded. There are basin wrenches, and then there are basin wrenches.
     
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  4. jay_wat

    jay_wat Plumber

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    Skagit Valley
    get the proper sized drill bit,,that will make quick work of it! good luck to ya!!
     
  5. MASTERPLUMB777

    MASTERPLUMB777 In the Trades

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    You need a ridgid # 1017 basin wrench that will take it right off !

    They are made much heavy-er duty then the cheap you might buy at a hardware store
     
  6. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

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    Aug 31, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    The neat way is to cut the nut with a dremel. I like to use a cold chisel. The nut will either turn, or split. It takes some "touch" because you don't want to damage the sink. I have done it often, with no accidents.
     
  7. learning

    learning New Member

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    Comforting to hear someone more experienced refer to it as not that corroded. (Pic was taken after 2 applications of PB Blaster, which did help some.) Excellent point about the basin wrenches. The ones I've seen around here (so far) are the smaller ones meant for water line connections, so I'll have to keep looking.
     
  8. learning

    learning New Member

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    Aug 2, 2010
    Location:
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    @jay_wat: if only I had one that size…
    @MACPLUMB 777: Thank you so much for pointing me in the right direction for what to look for. Very helpful, as the ones I keep finding are pretty "cheap" feeling.
    @jimbo: I tried something similar to the chisel method you describe, with a flat-head screwdriver and a hammer, which obviously doesn't have the heft and force of impact a good chisel does. Great idea with the dremel. I might be able to borrow one; will have to do some calling in the morning.

    Thanks, everyone, for sharing your expertise with me!
     
  9. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

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    San Diego, CA
    I guess what was meant was "if you want to see corroded, you should have seen the monster over at Mrs. Smith's house!" Sort of plumber's wives tales!
     
  10. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    faucet

    Even if you get it "loose" you will have a problem unless you have someone to hold the top while you struggle with the nut. Use a drill bit and drill on both sides of the nut. It will then "fall off".

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Use a drill bit and drill on both sides of the nut. It will then "fall off".

    [​IMG]

    The new faucet.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 3, 2018
  11. satyenshah

    satyenshah New Member

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    Chapel Hill, NC
    hj: after all the effort drilling out the old nut, no Teflon tape on the threads of the new nut?
     
  12. cjlambert

    cjlambert Red-Seal Licensed Plumber

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    Homeowner to plumber: F**k you!
    Plumber to plumber: Thank you!
     
    MASTERPLUMB777 likes this.
  13. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    It would not serve any purpose to put TPFE tape on the thread.
     
  14. cjlambert

    cjlambert Red-Seal Licensed Plumber

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    “Teflon tape helps you get a watertight seal on threaded pipe joints. It also helps lubricate the connection, making the threading a bit smoother, and it helps to prevent pipes from sticking when you want to disassemble the joint.”

    Source: https://www.thespruce.com/how-to-use-teflon-tape-2718712
     
  15. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Tape is the most misused product in plumbing. So many times when I get called out for a leak, it's just a matter of removing tape that should have never been used. It's very rare for any DIY or homeowner plumbing that would ever need tape.

    Flex supply lines for faucets? They come with seals on the ends already.
    Water heater flex? They also come with seals.
    Bathtub drains? The seal is made with the rubber washer between the shoe and the tub.
    Compression stops? Nope, the seal is made with the ferrule.

    Straight threads don't need tape, it sometimes prevents the nut from threading up all the way.

    You can use tape on tapered threaded pipe if you are threading on a fitting. A thing that a homeowner will almost never do.
     
  16. koa

    koa In the Trades

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    Apr 12, 2005
    Location:
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Drilling with long bit is probably easiest since Dremel might not fit. Wear eye protection. If you can get some sort of wrench on it but no room to turn it, try unscrewing faucet from top. You might have to disassemble it a bit depending on design to get a grip on a non rotating part.
     
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