Fleck 5600SXT hard water

Users who are viewing this thread

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
39,037
Reaction score
4,486
Points
113
Location
IL
Wow, I knew my settings weren't optimal but I didn't think they were that far off.
Softening should have been really good right after a regeneration.

Consider selecting from one of these pairs of C and H below.

The less salt per cubic ft, the more salt efficient, but more hardness breakthrough.
Revised based on number from https://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?threads/help-for-programming-fleck-5810.82673/#post-595983

BLFC = 0.5
cubic ft resin = 0.87
Alternative C and BF pairs:
lb/cuft ; C= ; BF=
3.448 ; 13.3 ; 2
5.172 ; 16.9 ; 3 ;Leaner than most
6.897 ; 19.5 ; 4
8.621 ; 21.5 ; 5 ;This is where I might go
10.345 ; 23.1 ; 6 ;more salt than most, but I would probably go there with only 0.87 cuft of resin
12.069 ; 24.3 ; 7
13.793 ; 25.3 ; 8
15.517 ; 26.2 ; 9

I understand that C is only programmable in whole numbers in the 5600SXT. Truncation would be the better choice.
 

Bannerman

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,886
Reaction score
810
Points
113
Location
Ontario, Canada
With 7 gallons programmed to enter the brine tank, depending on the dimensions of your brine tank, it could be the safety float is being raised which will stop the incoming flow to prevent the brine tank from overflowing. There have been past instances where brine draw was a problem while the safety float was raised.

Pushing down the safety float during Brine Draw should open the safety valve which may allow the brine to be drawn through the safety valve. A method to determine if the 5600 is preventing BD is to disconnect the brine tube at the top of the brine tank, then manually advance the SXT controller to BD to determine if there is any suction detected on the open brine tube end. If no suction, then the source of the issue will typically be the 56oo. If there is suction, then the issue will be within the brine tank.
 
Last edited:

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
39,037
Reaction score
4,486
Points
113
Location
IL
No. If there is suction detected on the brine tube leading from the 5600, then the 5600 is not the issue.
Yes, but if you can suck water at the softener end of the tube, the safety float is not the issue.
 

Duaned

New Member
Messages
16
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Santa Cruz, California
The total grains capacity for 0.87 ft3 of resin is (.87 X 32,000/ft3 =) 27,840 grains. Your current C-48K grain setting will result in regeneration occurring long after the resin's capacity has been depleted.

The resin's total capacity will not be programmed as 'C'. The usual 'C' setting recommendation for 0.87 ft3 is 20,880 grains which will require only 6.96 lbs salt to regenerate.

If your 5600SXT is equipped with the most common 0.5 gpm BLFC (brine line flow control = brine tank fill rate), your current BF-14 setting should be causing 7-gallons water to enter the brine tank. Each gallon will dissolve 3 lbs salt so your current BF setting is likely resulting in as much as 21 lbs salt to be consumed each regeneration cycle.

Because there are other flow restrictors also available (0.125, 0.25 & 1.0 gpm), the BLFC flow rate should be verified before calculating the appropriate BF setting. There is typically a label located nearby to the brine tube connection which will specify the BLFC flow restrictor originally installed.

So C- 21 and BF- 6 ?
 

Duaned

New Member
Messages
16
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Santa Cruz, California
With 7 gallons programmed to enter the brine tank, depending on the dimensions of your brine tank, it could be the safety float is being raised which will stop the incoming flow to prevent the brine tank from overflowing. There have been past instances where brine draw was a problem while the safety float was raised.

Pushing down the safety float during Brine Draw should open the safety valve which may allow the brine to be drawn through the safety valve. A method to determine if the 5600 is preventing BD is to disconnect the brine tube at the top of the brine tank, then manually advance the SXT controller to BD to determine if there is any suction detected on the open brine tube end. If no suction, then the source of the issue will typically be the 56oo. If there is suction, then the issue will be within the brine tank.

My brine tank has a usable capacity of about 19 gallons. I've never seen the water level high enough to engage the safety.
 

Bannerman

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,886
Reaction score
810
Points
113
Location
Ontario, Canada
So C- 21 and BF- 6 ?
My calculation above was based on 8 lbs salt being needed to regenerate 24,000 grains capacity in 1 ft3 of resin. This is a common recommendation to achieve a great balance of capacity, efficiency and water quality.

Because your softener contains only 0.87 ft3 resin, then 24,000 X 0.87 = 20,880 usable grains Capacity.
8 lbs salt X 0.87 = 6.96 lbs.

To dissolve 6.96 lbs, 2.32 gallons water will be needed. With 0.5 BLFC, then the BF setting needed will then be 4.64 minutes. When the BF programming only allow whole numbers, there is little choice but to round-up to the next whole number, ie 5 minutes.

While the hardness removal efficiency for 20,880 / 6.96 lbs = 3,000 grains per lb, the increase in BF time will result in lower efficiency. (5 minutes X 0.5 = 2.5 gallons X 3 lbs = 7.5 lbs salt. 20,880 / 7.5 = 2,784 grains per lb)

Although Reach4's recommendation will achieve lower efficiency at ~2,555 grains/lb, the higher capacity setting will result in fewer regeneration cycles needed per month from your small softener.

The hardness amount in the water should rightly be tested at your location. Often, municipal water is obtained from multiple sources so the usual assumption is for the average hardness from all sources to be programmed. Depending on your home's location in relation to each water source can alter the hardness amount at your location so it's usually advisable to program hardness as 2-3 gpg higher than the test amount to anticipate occasions when hardness may be higher than anticipated. When the actual hardness is higher than programmed, the regenerated capacity will be depleted more rapidly than anticipated.
 

Duaned

New Member
Messages
16
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Santa Cruz, California
My calculation above was based on 8 lbs salt being needed to regenerate 24,000 grains capacity in 1 ft3 of resin. This is a common recommendation to achieve a great balance of capacity, efficiency and water quality.

Because your softener contains only 0.87 ft3 resin, then 24,000 X 0.87 = 20,880 usable grains Capacity.
8 lbs salt X 0.87 = 6.96 lbs.

To dissolve 6.96 lbs, 2.32 gallons water will be needed. With 0.5 BLFC, then the BF setting needed will then be 4.64 minutes. When the BF programming only allow whole numbers, there is little choice but to round-up to the next whole number, ie 5 minutes.

While the hardness removal efficiency for 20,880 / 6.96 lbs = 3,000 grains per lb, the increase in BF time will result in lower efficiency. (5 minutes X 0.5 = 2.5 gallons X 3 lbs = 7.5 lbs salt. 20,880 / 7.5 = 2,784 grains per lb)

Although Reach4's recommendation will achieve lower efficiency at ~2,555 grains/lb, the higher capacity setting will result in fewer regeneration cycles needed per month from your small softener.

The hardness amount in the water should rightly be tested at your location. Often, municipal water is obtained from multiple sources so the usual assumption is for the average hardness from all sources to be programmed. Depending on your home's location in relation to each water source can alter the hardness amount at your location so it's usually advisable to program hardness as 2-3 gpg higher than the test amount to anticipate occasions when hardness may be higher than anticipated. When the actual hardness is higher than programmed, the regenerated capacity will be depleted more rapidly than anticipated.

Looks like the hardness is still about the same. I don't see it changing much as the supply is 100% from local wells within about a mile of each other and they all pull from the same aquifer.
 

DIYMissus

Member
Messages
118
Reaction score
4
Points
18
Location
Ontario, Canada
Looks like the hardness is still about the same. I don't see it changing much as the supply is 100% from local wells within about a mile of each other and they all pull from the same aquifer.
Oh it can change in 15 years our well went from 38 gpg with 7 ppm iron to 120 gpg with 2.4 ppm iron. A hach 5B hardness test is always a good thing to have.
 

Duaned

New Member
Messages
16
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Santa Cruz, California
Hach 5B test shows a hardness of 19.

Rebuilding the head didn't help so I've replaced the media. It's producing soft water (<1 gpg) so far...

Thanks everyone for your help.

Duane
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks