Faucet removal - Very tight spot - Best way?

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Snorp

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My best wishes to all.

I need to replace the faucet on a bathroom vanity as the water flow is unacceptably slow. I've looked at other reasons for the slowness of the flow, but it comes down to the basic design of the faucet - which came with the vanity. I've bought a replacement faucet.

I'm attaching a picture so you might get a general idea of what I'm dealing with. The fact is that the distance from the edge of the nut to the back wall is about 5/8 of an inch - no more, perhaps a bit less. The distance from the edge of the nut to the back of the basin is about 3/8 of an inch. I have a 'Husky' faucet wrench but I've not had any success in getting it to clamp to the nut.

The vanity is some 30 inches long and fits against the wall along the back side and the right side. On the back side, I've installed a piece of tile along the back that sets almost flush with the vanity top.

The only way that I know of to take that faucet out is by using some special tool that I'm not aware of. Or, remove the vanity top. I installed that top myself and I used a liberal amount of clear waterproof sealant all around. Considering the wall and the tile at the rear and the wall on the right side, I'm concerned about how that would go - and the best method to cut through the existing sealant.

The install was done about two years ago and the vanity and top weren't cheap but they weren't expensive either. Thankfully, the new faucet that I've already bought installs using screws to tighten the faucet to the vanity top but that's not important at the moment.

My stepdaughter and my wife have been pestering me for some time to get this done. But...

All suggestions and opinions will be very much appreciated.

Andy

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Terry

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Things that may work.

basin-wrench-ridgid.jpg


Basin wrench

tub-sockets.jpg


Sockets that might fit.

Or if worst comes to worst, I sometimes have to put on eye protection and drill a section of the nut out.

faucet-nut-drilled-3.jpg


faucet-nut-drilled-5.jpg
 
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Tuttles Revenge

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When you get that out (good luck) using one of Terrys suggestions.. make sure you buy a new faucet that has screws through that nut to do the final tightening. They're much easier to install and remove later.

*I see in your post that you know of the suggestion of the new faucet*

My go to would be the basin wrench too.
 

Snorp

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Things that may work.

basin-wrench-ridgid.jpg


Basin wrench

tub-sockets.jpg


Sockets that might fit.

Or if worst comes to worst, I sometimes have to put on eye protection and drill a section of the nut out.


Thanks Terry. I apologize for being so late in commenting but I thought I had notifications set up for this post but apparently I didn't.

The basin wrench 'gripper' is too wide and the socket is the best idea I've seen. But, the nut is about 1.25 or 1.38 AF and I've looked and looked but I can't find one anywhere near that size. If anyone knows of a possible source, please let me know.

Thanks again Terry.


Andy
 

Snorp

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When you get that out (good luck) using one of Terrys suggestions.. make sure you buy a new faucet that has screws through that nut to do the final tightening. They're much easier to install and remove later.

*I see in your post that you know of the suggestion of the new faucet*

My go to would be the basin wrench too.


Thanks Mr. Tuttle. I thought I had set up automatic notifications for my post but apparently not. I apologize for my delayed response. As I just mentioned to Terry, the 'gripper' on the basin wrench just takes up too much space and I've looked but I haven't been able to find a socket wrench of the size I need - some 1.25 or 1.38 inches.

With my regards,

Andy
 

Reach4

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But, the nut is about 1.25 or 1.38 AF and I've looked and looked but I can't find one anywhere near that size.
I think 1-9/32 and 1-11/32 are near 1.25 or 1.38.

One shower wrench set says: "Fits 21/32 in. x 27/32 in., 29/32 in. x 31/32 in., 1-1/32 in. x 1-3/32 in., 1-5/32 in. x 1-9/32 in., 1-11/32 in. x 1-7/16 in."

There are also more destructive methods that could be used by a skilled person. Might involve a cutoff wheel or saw.
 
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WorthFlorida

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You can cut the lines right at the sleeve and use a socket wrench that is if you can get a set of diagonals in there. SS braided hose can be a little tough to cut.
 
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