Cleanout Behind Proposed Shower

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Joey Leavitt

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I am finishing my basement and I have an issue with one cleanout. The cleanout is just above the basement slab. It is a 2" drain pipe from the washer/floor drain on the second floor. It transitions to 3" for the cleanout and UG. The problem that I have is very limited space to accomplish the floor plan. The shower is going to cover this cleanout. My question is, can I somehow move the cleanout either horizontally or vertically to get it from behind the shower wall? I don't see anyway to cut an access into the shower wall successfully.

Also, for wet venting my proposed fixtures to an aav under the sink, what would the arrangement of piping have to be?
 

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WorthFlorida

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I think the clean out is for the 3" main under the slab, not the washer stack above. There may be one on the second floor. Without a picture to go by is it a 2" pipe vertically connected to 3"? In the transition the tee or wye that has the clean out? You can add a cleanout on the 2" vertical and bring it out past the shower wall or on the other side of the wall if possible with an access panel. You need to use fittings that will allow a snake to be pushed into the pipe and easily travel to the 3" pipe. Long 90 degree elbows and wye, not sani-tees. Will you be busting up concrete to add the fixtures or is it all pre-piped before the concrete was poured?
 

Joey Leavitt

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I'm busting the floor. Already broke a small square out over the main in line with the toilet, to confirm the pipe locator that I rented was accurate (it was). Attached is a picture of the 2" washer line/clean out. Each plumbed room in my house has its own waste stack. There are 5 waste stacks in my basement. No rooms tie together until underslab.
 

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WorthFlorida

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That is sure a tight situation and to hack into it could be more trouble than its worth. One option is add a dummy wall to extend it out a 1.5" or so where the clean out would be behind drywall and add a clean out to a different location assuming this is for the 3" line.
Another is place the shower in the other corner and in that 2' ft space build a closet, you'll still have access to this clean out.
 

Joey Leavitt

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I still have to frame/fur out the exterior walls regardless. I can use 2x6 in lieu of 2x4 on this wall to bury it. Where would I move the cleanout to? That is what I am unsure on code-wise where it needs to be (up, left, in the slab, etc). I am assuming the only reason it is there is because of the 90 at the bottom of the stack? Even if I place the shower on the other wall, it still conflicts. It is about center of the room.

Also, any suggestions on the arrangement of drain pipe for the fixtures to wet vent through an aav under the sink?
 

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wwhitney

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For the wet vent, you need to keep the 3 fixtures separate from the existing 3" line carrying the upstairs washer, until all three have combined; then the joint bathroom drain can hit the existing 3" line. Also, the lav needs to be part of the upstream most joint. So you can either have lav + WC upstream, then shower, then join the 3" line; or lav + shower upstream, then WC, then join the 3" line. [The UPC requires the latter rather than the former, but the IPC does not, and I understand Utah follows the IPC.]

I assume the top of the page is the upstream end of the 3" line with the 2" washer drain coming down into it? Then you'll need to run the shower drain down parallel to the 3" line. The lav can go into the slab, hit the WC, and then shower line can come in. For a 2" trap, the IPC allows an 8' trap arm (from the trap to where you hit the wet vent) with a perfect 1/4" per foot slope, so that's fine.

Cheers, Wayne
 

wwhitney

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On the cleanout, if you are breaking the slab where the stack comes down, then you could install a floor cleanout with a flush brass cover. Otherwise, looks like you only need to move the cleanout 12" - 18" to the left. You could replace the vent-tee/cleanout that's there with a wye, with the side branch going to the left; then the cleanout line would run up and to the left until clear of the shower, and then terminate in the face of the wall, maybe with a LT90, cleanout adapter and plug, if that would fit in the wall.

Or you could just jog the whole stack to the left, replacing the vent-tee/cleanout with a 45, going vertical once clear of the shower, then a new vent-tee/cleanout, then reduce to 2" and jog back to the right with 45s to pick up the washer drain above.

Cheers, Wayne
 

wwhitney

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Yeah, that's the right order of connecting things for horizontal wet vetting. What are you doing for a lav vent, and where?

I'd suggest moving the horizontal line from the wall to the existing 3" line to one side of the WC flange. That way you can put a wye in the new horizontal line, with the branch horizontal and pointing towards the WC flange; then a closet bend and two pieces of pipe to connect the closet flange to the wye.

[Actually, you might need to check if a 3" combo (on the existing line) plus a 3" wye is too big to fit between the closet flange and the existing line. The tightest pattern for the WC to the existing line would be a 3" horizontal wye on the existing line, then an upright street wye on the branch inlet, with the straight inlet receiving the shower/lav, and the branch inlet connected to the closet flange.]

Cheers, Wayne
 

wwhitney

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Since a combo is just a wye plus a street 45, I suggests you avoid any 90 degree horizontal-horizontal joints in your drawing and rather draw them explicitly as two 45s. Which should help you avoid any unnecessary 45s.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Joey Leavitt

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[Actually, you might need to check if a 3" combo (on the existing line) plus a 3" wye is too big to fit between the closet flange and the existing line. The tightest pattern for the WC to the existing line would be a 3" horizontal wye on the existing line, then an upright street wye on the branch inlet, with the straight inlet receiving the shower/lav, and the branch inlet connected to the closet flange.]

You are correct on the limited space between existing and WC. Rather than an upright street wye, would the fitting in the attached picture work to connect up to the closet flange, and the 2" inlet connection to the shower/lav?
 

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Terry

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I would have preferred using wyes there to pick up the toilet and the shower.
Maybe a 3" wye off the main line, then a 3" to pick up the toilet, with a 3x2 flush bush, to a long turn 90 up into the wall for the lav and vent.
Or continue with 3" to the wall if you want a full size cleanout there.

joey-floor-plan.jpg
 

Joey Leavitt

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This makes sense. Going to have to vent to an AAV under the sink, however (building inspector said it's okay?). Would what I drew up work? Or is it utter nonsense (attached)? I am capable with framing and electrical, just not plumbing. I am mainly doing it myself because I'd like to learn to be a little more competent at it.
 

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Terry

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The toilet should not drop into a santee fitting. It could be a wye with 45 or a combo.
The tee doesn't direct the waste downhill.
 

Joey Leavitt

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I think I have a good enough idea now of how to proceed. Thanks everybody for your help! I've gotta say, these forums on this site are pretty awesome. Thanks again!
 
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