Best well pump for residential home

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Rman

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I need the experts recommendation for my home water well. There is a 10 gpm 230v submersible pump in service for 5 years no name just Pentair motor. My well is 6 inch 325 feet deep static level 5 feet water started at 260 feet produces 4GPM
Distance to house is 25 feet
I have CSV then BB10 sediment filter then water softener. Two full time adults in home.
I got a suggestion of a Gould’s 10Gpm 230v two wire stainless steel unit 10GS07422C ??
Do I need a 10Gpm pump? 7gpm better? Will both lift water the 300 feet at 40 psi?
Do not want to change pump every 5 years best model/motor/pump is all I’m interested in
Thanks
 

Reach4

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Planning ahead makes sense, but changing your working pump prospectively does not make sense to me.

Your 6 inch casing gives you a lot of storage, so you are unlikely to ever pump your water down to 300 ft.
 

Rman

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Planning ahead makes sense, but changing your working pump prospectively does not make sense to me.

Your 6 inch casing gives you a lot of storage, so you are unlikely to ever pump your water down to 300 ft.

you’re correct have not run out of water
I irrigate my lawn/garden from my lake
I’m asking to have a spare brand name pump on hand for the it’s snowing and the pump died
Our lake does freeze . I’ll need my well driller to pull the old pump. Trying to save time.
Also other than warranty can I store in my basement the new replacement pump for say a year or more?
 

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The newer model 10GS07 can build a max of 390' of head. So, it can pump from 300' deep and still produce 38 PSI. If the water pulls down to 300' it may not be able to get to 60 and shut off, but that would be rare and it should work fine.

Couple of problems with your idea though. You need to talk to the driller and see if he will even set a pump that he did not sell? Most won't. Next it is hard to store a submersible motor for very long, as the cooing fluid inside will likely leak or evaporate over time. You would need to figure out how to top off the motor fluid before installing if it sat for a year or more. It is not hard to do. It may only need a few ounces of water to top it off, but those are important ounces.
 

Rman

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The newer model 10GS07 can build a max of 390' of head. So, it can pump from 300' deep and still produce 38 PSI. If the water pulls down to 300' it may not be able to get to 60 and shut off, but that would be rare and it should work fine.

Couple of problems with your idea though. You need to talk to the driller and see if he will even set a pump that he did not sell? Most won't. Next it is hard to store a submersible motor for very long, as the cooing fluid inside will likely leak or evaporate over time. You would need to figure out how to top off the motor fluid before installing if it sat for a year or more. It is not hard to do. It may only need a few ounces of water to top it off, but those are important ounces.

Thank you for your help and knowledge.
Why do I read all over the internet that Gould’s pumps are built like crap to last 3-5 years at most ?
If I decide to buy a pump as a backup how would I know where to add water/fluid to maintain the pump seals?
 

2stupid2fixit

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Since you have a large enough well case, and you want a backup failover plan, why not install 300 feet of PVC pipe ALSO down the well together with your submersible that's already there. Then up on the ground you could put a jet pump. If/when your submersible quits, you could simply prime the jet pump and draw water that way with the simple flip of a switch and turn of a ball valve. The jet pump would be above ground so you wouldnt have to worry about it drying out, as you could exercise it once in a while. I don't know if my idea would work but it made sense in my head. Let the other experts weigh in on my idea for you and see what they say.


Thank you for your help and knowledge.
Why do I read all over the internet that Gould’s pumps are built like crap to last 3-5 years at most ?
If I decide to buy a pump as a backup how would I know where to add water/fluid to maintain the pump seals?

About Goulds pumps being crap I can say that's not entirely true, UNLESS they were once good and then the Goulds name was sold out to some other outfit. Maybe the Goulds name is now on flimsy chinese imports made of inferior quality. I don't know. What I CAN tell you is that my house was built in 1973 and the well was installed at the same time. This Goulds pump was 200 feet down a 250 foot well and worked fine for 46 years.
I bought a Hallmark MA0459X-14A and will be happy but surprised if it lasts 2 years. It was only $150 which is great because I am broke.
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With a static water level of 5', a shallow well jet pump would work, but only until the water level pulled down to 24'. A shallow well jet pump just cannot lift more than about 24'. I don't think this well will produce any water to speak of above 24'.

Goulds is now Xylem. They still make a good pump end, as not much has changed. However, Goulds now makes their own motor instead of using Franklin motors as they did for many years. I think they maybe close to working the bugs out of their Centripro motors, but they have had some problems getting there. Centripro and Pentek had problems with the capacitors in the two wire motors, and I hear the top bearings are locking down in the 3 wire motors. I think they got the capacitor problem fixed after I let them know about it. They were blaming Cycle Stop Valves for motor failures, so I had to do autopsy's on a couple of motors to figure it out. The Pentair sales person was actually very ugly to me and was adamant the CSV caused the failures. This was even though the customer had three houses on CSV's for over a dozen years without any problems with the previous Pentair pumps. Which BTW was because they use to have Franklin motors on them. She never called me back and fessed up that I was right, much less apologized for treating me so badly. But she told the customer who filled me in. They finally figured out the capacitors in the new motors were not made for continuous duty, which caused the failures.

In 1973 most pump companies made damn good pumps and motors. However, in the years since the world has changed. People only look for the lowest price when shopping for pumps, so now all that is available is cheaply built pumps. People would rather buy a Hallmark for 140 bucks that might last a couple of years than to spend a thousand dollars for something that could last 30-40 years. Nobody would purchase a pump for a $1000.00 when there is one for 140 bucks that will pump the same amount of water, even though the expensive pump would be the least expensive in the long run. You couldn't even find a high quality pump for a thousand dollars if you wanted. Middle of the road would be a $600 name brand pump that will last longer than the cheap pumps, but no where near as long as the pumps from the old days. They put just enough quality into pumps these days to make it last about 7 years on average. Some that are lightly used will still last 30 years, but with normal use and normal amount of cycling 7 years will be the average.

You can store a submersible pump/motor in a container full of water. Just keep the container topped off. Or you can top off it off with distilled water when you get ready to use it. Most can be filled fairly easily from the bottom. Place the pump/motor upside down. Take out the screws and remove the end cap and rubber diaphragm. Fill with water and replace the diaphragm and end cap.
 

Rman

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With a static water level of 5', a shallow well jet pump would work, but only until the water level pulled down to 24'. A shallow well jet pump just cannot lift more than about 24'. I don't think this well will produce any water to speak of above 24'.

Goulds is now Xylem. They still make a good pump end, as not much has changed. However, Goulds now makes their own motor instead of using Franklin motors as they did for many years. I think they maybe close to working the bugs out of their Centripro motors, but they have had some problems getting there. Centripro and Pentek had problems with the capacitors in the two wire motors, and I hear the top bearings are locking down in the 3 wire motors. I think they got the capacitor problem fixed after I let them know about it. They were blaming Cycle Stop Valves for motor failures, so I had to do autopsy's on a couple of motors to figure it out. Debra Getz, the Pentair sales person was actually very ugly to me and was adamant the CSV caused the failures. This was even though the customer had three houses on CSV's for over a dozen years without any problems with the previous Pentair pumps. Which BTW was because they use to have Franklin motors on them. She never called me back and fessed up that I was right, much less apologized for treating me so badly. But she told the customer who filled me in. They finally figured out the capacitors in the new motors were not made for continuous duty, which caused the failures.

In 1973 most pump companies made damn good pumps and motors. However, in the years since the world has changed. People only look for the lowest price when shopping for pumps, so now all that is available is cheaply built pumps. People would rather buy a Hallmark for 140 bucks that might last a couple of years than to spend a thousand dollars for something that could last 30-40 years. Nobody would purchase a pump for a $1000.00 when there is one for 140 bucks that will pump the same amount of water, even though the expensive pump would be the least expensive in the long run. You couldn't even find a high quality pump for a thousand dollars if you wanted. Middle of the road would be a $600 name brand pump that will last longer than the cheap pumps, but no where near as long as the pumps from the old days. They put just enough quality into pumps these days to make it last about 7 years on average. Some that are lightly used will still last 30 years, but with normal use and normal amount of cycling 7 years will be the average.

You can store a submersible pump/motor in a container full of water. Just keep the container topped off. Or you can top off it off with distilled water when you get ready to use it. Most can be filled fairly easily from the bottom. Place the pump/motor upside down. Take out the screws and remove the end cap and rubber diaphragm. Fill with water and replace the diaphragm and end cap.
 

Rman

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I figured that a shallow well single pipe pump would pull maybe 50 gallons. I’m 1600 ft above sea level
I understand your write up about Gould motors may still have problems. So now that you know my set up what pump/motor would you recommend? Think of this if it were your home. I’m in a rural area getting help up here takes time so I’d like as much lifespan outa my pump as possible. I do totally agree with you on the benefits of a CSV system. The pump vendors don’t know what they are selling. Thanks
 

Valveman

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My favorite is still a Grundfos pump on a Franklin motor. You have to order them separately and put the pump on the motor, but that is not hard. I am just astounded every day at how little pump manufactures, suppliers, and installers know about the pumps they sale. Like I have said before, I can count the number of pump guys in all the US who really know this stuff on my fingers, and a couple of those help out on this forum.

A single pipe jet pump is not going to make 50 GPM, but straight centrifugal like the GT Goulds will, as long as the water level is less than 24' and the well can supply that much.
 

Rman

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My favorite is still a Grundfos pump on a Franklin motor. You have to order them separately and put the pump on the motor, but that is not hard. I am just astounded every day at how little pump manufactures, suppliers, and installers know about the pumps they sale. Like I have said before, I can count the number of pump guys in all the US who really know this stuff on my fingers, and a couple of those help out on this forum.

A single pipe jet pump is not going to make 50 GPM, but straight centrifugal like the GT Goulds will, as long as the water level is less than 24' and the well can supply that much.
Good morning
I was thinking that a single pipe centrifugal pump would pull up 50 gallons of water not 50gpm till the static level goes below 24 feet
How would I find a distributor that would sell me the Franklin motor and grundfos pump separately?
They always sell as a set to up the price. I have no problem assembling it. I’d also wonder if they will warranty the pump/motor as an assembly or separately. I’ll search the interweb for distributors on the north east coast. Any suggestions?
Thanks
 

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Rman

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Actually I am having good luck so far with the Grundfos 3 wire motors, but not their 2 wire motors. You can find a unit like that here. https://waterpumpspro.com/index.php?main_page=shopping_cart

They also have the 10S07-12 pump end by itself here. https://waterpumpspro.com/index.php...ucts_id=4012:bd3ef5c19067fe179f71c8b86ea4b39b

And here is a 3/4HP Franklin motor. https://store.waterpumpsupply.com/frsu4mo34hp2.html
Thank you so much. That combo of motor/pump is perfect. I’m now on a fixed income stage of life and some quotes of $800-1000 are outa control
Last question do you prefer a brass or s/s 1 1/4 to 1 inch barb fitting at the pump? My down pipe is 1inch black ploy pipe. Be safe
 
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