Bathroom trap sizes and fitting selection...

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hhcibtpaun

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If you have only a single horizontal drain, and the laundry sink connects to it with a horizontal combo, then a vent just downstream of that combo could vent both the standpipe and the laundry sink. The vent would have to be close enough to work for the standpipe if the laundry sink weren't there, i.e. within 2" of fall of the outlet of the 2" standpipe trap. This is something the IPC allows called common venting, for any 2 fixtures).


Cheers, Wayne

Thanks Jeff and Wayne.

Wayne,

I played around with my image from above (I will mock up for real in the next day or two). Here is my cobbled together image:

newWasher2.jpg


I am a tad confused. When I read this "...a vent just downstream of that combo could vent both the standpipe and the laundry sink...". I was thinking the green line would be the location. After reading this "...The vent would have to be close enough to work for the standpipe if the laundry sink weren't there, i.e. within 2" of fall of the outlet of the 2" standpipe trap...." I was leaning to a vent in the red location...

The orange box is where the sink would be.

Also, for the vent, would I just use a WYE? Finally, is this a horizontal combo?

horizontal-combo.jpg


Thanks...Mike
 

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wwhitney

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Yes, the green line. The fitting you show is a combo, and "horizontal" just means all 3 connections are horizontal.

For the dry vent takeoff, IPC allows a san-tee on its back, but a vertical wye or combo is a better choice. Here "vertical" means the barrel is horizontal, but the side entry is vertical (or as vertical as possible for a wye).

Cheers, Wayne
 

hhcibtpaun

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Great, thanks. So, is there a max dimension from the P trap of the standpipe? 24", 30"....I think Jeff called out 30" maybe that is applicable here?

Maybe I will go with the combo for the vent too. I will mock something up before I glue, but I am feeling confident I can get this started soon :). Thanks again.
 

Reach4

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While UPC limits a laundry standpipe to 30 inches, IPC allows 40 or 42... have to look it up if it matters.
 

wwhitney

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Great, thanks. So, is there a max dimension from the P trap of the standpipe?
For IPC, the horizontal distance from trap to vent is just a consequence of the minimum slope of 1/4" per foot, and maximum fall of one pipe diameter. So for a 2" standpipe trap, if you slope your horizontal at the minimum of 1/4" per foot, it can be up to 8' away. More slope means less horizontal distance before you hit the maximum 2" fall.

Cheers, Wayne
 

hhcibtpaun

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While on my basement plumbing I had one other question related to connecting the 4" PVC to CI. This is what I initially purchased to connect. My thought was the longer connector would be better. After reading a few different things, maybe a banded connector is what is required?

Another option would be to pull the CI pipe out of the hub and use a Fernco bushing/donut....

Is one option preferable?

1. Use the Fernco in the picture?
2. Get a banded Fernco?
Pull the CI pipe out of the HUB and use a Fernco Bushing to connect the PVC into the hub? This is probably more of a PITA, but if it is the correct way to do it, I will do it. Although maybe the bushing is not as effective as the coupler?

4inch-small.jpg


Thanks...Mike
 

hhcibtpaun

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For IPC, the horizontal distance from trap to vent is just a consequence of the minimum slope of 1/4" per foot, and maximum fall of one pipe diameter. So for a 2" standpipe trap, if you slope your horizontal at the minimum of 1/4" per foot, it can be up to 8' away. More slope means less horizontal distance before you hit the maximum 2" fall.

Cheers, Wayne
Ahh ok, that clears up my confusion from your original post. So, I will probably end up like 4 or 5 feet from the trap....wow, all beginning to sink in....thank you.
 

wwhitney

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On the coupler, #1 is not allowed (unless you cover the coupler with dirt and consider it to be underground (not a serious comment)). #2 is fine, if you mean Fernco Proflex (or Mission Rubber BandSeal). #3 (donut) is also fine, no opinion on relative merits of #2 vs #3.

Cheers, Wayne
 

hhcibtpaun

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On the coupler, #1 is not allowed (unless you cover the coupler with dirt and consider it to be underground (not a serious comment)). #2 is fine, if you mean Fernco Proflex (or Mission Rubber BandSeal). #3 (donut) is also fine, no opinion on relative merits of #2 vs #3.

Cheers, Wayne

Thanks Wayne. Maybe it will be driven by what I can get quickest :)
 

Jeff H Young

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the 30 inch measurement I mentioned was if you chose to put a santee in the standpipe of the w/m to serve the sink .
I'm not that familiar with IPC code nor fond of the configuration but... read the code appears to be within use of "common venting"
BTW in response to the fernco coupler, I don't see it causing issue I suppose the shielded coupling would prevent sag ? how much weight is on that (under a pound) ? but it might protect rubber from exposure to air or drying out and cracking? in any case not legal. kind of a pet peeve to many even myself at times even myself but not much worry should it be
 
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hhcibtpaun

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the 30 inch measurement i mentioned was if you chose to put a santee in the standpipe of the w/m to serve the sink .
Im not that familiar with IPC code nor fond of the configuration but... read the code appears to be within use of "common venting"
BTW in responce to the fernco coupler, I dont see it causing issue i suppose the shielded coupling would prevent sag ? how much weight is on that (under a pound) ? but it might protect rubber from exposure to air or drying out and cracking? in any case not legal. kind of a pet peeve to many even myself at times even myself but not much worry should it be

Thanks Jeff. I think I cannot drain the sink into the standpipe, since the sink is so low. The one positive here is if I totally screw something up, it is all exposed so any edits I may need to make can be done without too much grief, hopefully.

I will attempt to get the plumbing in tomorrow....

Two silly questions. I Ended up getting a Plumbquick shielded coupling from Lowes. Is Proflex = Plumbquick. Both are Fernco and have the same part number. I am assuming the plumbquick is the big box store branding?

Also, if I use the combo fitting for my vent, should the vertical portion be closer to sink or vent? I am assuming closer to the sink, but maybe it does not matter for the vent?

Ok, one more. After I get the drain situated and the vent vertically above the standpipe and sink a foot or so, I may need to play fitting fun to wind it to where it needs to be. I assume anything pretty much goes at that point...meaning I can use tighter corners if need be to get it to where I need to send it through the ceiling? Then I will pick up the kitchen plumbing from there.

Thanks....Mike
 

wwhitney

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I think Plumbquick is a house brand made by Fernco. If it's a metal shielded coupling about 2" long (axially), it's the right type.

With the vent takeoff, imagine there's a blockage and it fills with water. When the blockage clear, the water should be directed to flow towards the drain.

Once the vent is 6" above the fixture flood rim, you can use vent 90s if required, although regular quarter bends are cheaper if they will fit. You want everything pitched back to the drain, but you can go horizontal/vertical as required.

Cheers, Wayne
 

hhcibtpaun

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I think Plumbquick is a house brand made by Fernco. If it's a metal shielded coupling about 2" long (axially), it's the right type.

With the vent takeoff, imagine there's a blockage and it fills with water. When the blockage clear, the water should be directed to flow towards the drain.
Cool, thanks. Yeah that is the connector I have. As for the vent, in my speak it would put the vertical closer to the sink....basically with the flow.

Again, thanks for everything. I am trying to get this house ready so I can rent it to my niece dirt cheap.....basically what it costs me, so anything I can do on my own helps out....

Mike
 

hhcibtpaun

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Quick question on Kitchen sink vent/drain. I was originally going to run my P-trap into a 2" sanitary tee and take the vent off the top, but when I drill though the plate in the floor, the 2" is a little too big, so I was going to run 1/2" through the floor, then once under the floor into the basement I was going to run 2".

First, I assume this is OK? Also, for the vent, can I run 1 1/2", that will eventually join into 2" (maybe 5 feet or so), or do I run 2" from the top of the TEE?

Thanks...Mike
 

wwhitney

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Since you are under the IPC, everything having to do with the kitchen sink can be 1-1/2".

The UPC would require that the outlet of your san-tee be 2" (and then of course 2" minimum downstream). That seems like a good idea to me, so I suggest sticking as close to that as possible. Why can't you drill a 2-1/2" hole through the bottom plate?

Cheers, Wayne
 

hhcibtpaun

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Why can't you drill a 2-1/2" hole through the bottom plate?

Cheers, Wayne
Wayne,

Thanks. I drilled through the plate with a 2 9/16' hole but there after I get through the plate, there is a 2x10 or something that the plate is resting on and invades the hole by like an 1/8". I had a similar issue with a vent I was running through...i ended up going crazy with a chisel and sawzall to get that to work.

I figured if I had a 1 1/2" p-trap, going into a 1 1/2" sanitary tee, then take that through the floor into a 2"drain. So, I would have 20" or so if 1 1/2" before it it the 2". On the vent side, the 1 1/2" vent would run for 4 or 5 feet before it merged with a 2" vent.

I could get the 2" to work with much more aggravation. If it is that much better to have the 2" everywhere I can go that route. Just was not sure if using the 1 1/2" for short runs would be that detrimental.

Thanks....Mike
 

wwhitney

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I could get the 2" to work with much more aggravation. If it is that much better to have the 2" everywhere I can go that route. Just was not sure if using the 1 1/2" for short runs would be that detrimental.
No opinion on that, as under the UPC it wouldn't be optional, so we'd just make it work.

Doesn't sound like you'd have too hard a time, you could enlarge the hole a little, let the pipe stick out into the drywall a little (shave the back of the drywall when it is installed), tilt the pipe a couple degrees, use a 22.5 degree elbow at the subfloor, shave a little off the 2x10 (only if it's supported over a wall below or you just need a 1/16"), etc. Various options.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Reach4

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If you could feed 2-inch copper thru there (2.125 OD), you could couple to and from that with shielded couplers connecting to 2 inch plastic.
 

hhcibtpaun

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OK, so far everyone has helped me through my basement and kitchen plumbing. The last link in the chain is the bathroom. Basically a tub/shower, lav and toilet. My goal is to make things as simple as possible.

I pulled all of the previous drains out and noted that they hacked up the joists pretty good. Joists were notched in multiple places, so I sistered them and added one or two new ones. As it turns out, I may have made my life more difficult with the added joists.

Here is a view of the bathroom floor, taken from kitchen. It is difficult to envision, but I will try to explain.

floor.jpg


The blue line is generally where I would attempt to run my drain. The white fitting is the actual tub drain and everything would head toward the main stack, which would be the upper right of this photo.

Here is a pic of the tubing that would comprise this run.

bath-drain-crop.jpg


To the left is the 2" p-trap for the tub. The yellow highlighted pipe would be the lav drain, then the green pipe would be the vent for both the tub and lav. Would this work?

Could the yellow be the vent for both and the green be the drain for the lav? I am not sure that would work, just wondering.

Hopefully my description makes sense. So, would this work? Worst case I could create separate vents for both, but i am trying to minimize the destruction to the joists.

Thanks...Mike
 
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