After new pressure switch pump doesn't shut off and tank loses pressure

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Verywellfl

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Bought 1965 manufactured home with well, above ground well pump. Pump stopped once in a while but turned back back when " kicked" in the side. My Ex installed new pressure switch 40/60, don't know what the old one was. Noticed that tank had not pressure at all- strange....
Hand- pumped tank up to 38psi. Pump turned on but won't shut off. Tank pressure goes up to 54psi when pump is running. Pulled breaker to shut it off. Tank pressure was only 30psi after approx. 1 hour. Leak in the tank?
Also, water doesn't last as long as usual (I could use a lot of water before the pump kicked in, now I can use only a little before I must turn pump/ breaker back on.

What worries me is, that my neighbors pump is running way longer and more often than usual...(dried well?).
My pump wasn't used for about 2 weeks before this happened.

Any suggestions??
Thank you
 
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Valveman

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Yes the tank is bad if it is losing air and doesn't hold as much water. The tank bladder is broken from the pump cycling on and off too much, which will also kill your pump. Replacing the tank, you might as well upgrade to a constant pressure system using a Cycle Stop Valve and a little 4.5 gallon size tank as comes in the PK1A kit. Large tanks are no longer needed, and as you have found out they also do not limit the cycling enough to make things last.
 

Verywellfl

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Yes the tank is bad if it is losing air and doesn't hold as much water. The tank bladder is broken from the pump cycling on and off too much, which will also kill your pump. Replacing the tank, you might as well upgrade to a constant pressure system using a Cycle Stop Valve and a little 4.5 gallon size tank as comes in the PK1A kit. Large tanks are no longer needed, and as you have found out they also do not limit the cycling enough to make things last.
Thank you very much! I'll get a new tank and hope for the best
 

LLigetfa

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Pump turned on but won't shut off. Tank pressure goes up to 54psi when pump is running.
A bad tank won't prevent the pump from shutting off. It sounds like 54 PSI is all the pump can muster. Readjust the pressure switch to 30/50 or less.
 

Valveman

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Thank you very much! I'll get a new tank and hope for the best
This would be better than just a tank and hoping for the best.
 

Verywellfl

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This would be better than just a tank and hoping for the best.
I'm still not sold on a CSV in my situation. Single person household, try to preserve as much water as I can. Using rain water for plants and/ or watering plants once a week. No bathtub, toilet flushing reduced to about 1/day. A 20 gallon tank lasts a while. I don't see the need of running the water continuously with a CSV. ( In one post you stated your pump is running since 1999 continuously...does this mean you water is running continuously?? (Sorry if this is a dumb question.)
 

Valveman

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I'm still not sold on a CSV in my situation. Single person household, try to preserve as much water as I can. Using rain water for plants and/ or watering plants once a week. No bathtub, toilet flushing reduced to about 1/day. A 20 gallon tank lasts a while. I don't see the need of running the water continuously with a CSV. ( In one post you stated your pump is running since 1999 continuously...does this mean you water is running continuously?? (Sorry if this is a dumb question.)
It is obvious that your pump cycles more than you think, or your tank bladder would not be bad now. The bladder in the tank goes up and down with each pump cycle, which is bending it back and forth over and over until it breaks. Just one of many signs a pumps is cycling too much. A 20 gallon tank only holds 5 gallons of water, which means your pump cycles on and off for every 5 gallons used. A house uses between 150 and 300 gallons per day, which can cause lots of cycling. Even an 80 gallon tank that holds 20 gallons of water would cause many cycles per day.

I have a pump running 3 GPM into an open stock tank, which is why it never shuts off. A CSV would only cause your pump to stay running WHILE any faucet is on, which is much better for the pump than letting the pump cycle on and off. When you turn off all the water, the CSV will let the pump shut off. You can use whatever size tank you want with a CSV, but because it keeps the pump running until you turn off all the faucets, the size of tank is almost moot. When you have a Cycle Stop Valve to stop the pump from cycling, you don't need much of a tank. The 4.5 gallon size tank only holds 1 gallon of water, which is all that is needed as the CSV has control. But if it gives you a warm and fuzzy feeling to spend more on a tank to hold 4 gallons extra, then you should get a 20 gallon size tank. But whatever size tank you want, add a CSV, as no tank can be large enough to eliminate pump cycling.
 

Verywellfl

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It is obvious that your pump cycles more than you think, or your tank bladder would not be bad now. The bladder in the tank goes up and down with each pump cycle, which is bending it back and forth over and over until it breaks. Just one of many signs a pumps is cycling too much. A 20 gallon tank only holds 5 gallons of water, which means your pump cycles on and off for every 5 gallons used. A house uses between 150 and 300 gallons per day, which can cause lots of cycling. Even an 80 gallon tank that holds 20 gallons of water would cause many cycles per day.

I have a pump running 3 GPM into an open stock tank, which is why it never shuts off. A CSV would only cause your pump to stay running WHILE any faucet is on, which is much better for the pump than letting the pump cycle on and off. When you turn off all the water, the CSV will let the pump shut off. You can use whatever size tank you want with a CSV, but because it keeps the pump running until you turn off all the faucets, the size of tank is almost moot. When you have a Cycle Stop Valve to stop the pump from cycling, you don't need much of a tank. The 4.5 gallon size tank only holds 1 gallon of water, which is all that is needed as the CSV has control. But if it gives you a warm and fuzzy feeling to spend more on a tank to hold 4 gallons extra, then you should get a 20 gallon size tank. But whatever size tank you want, add a CSV, as no tank can be large enough to eliminate pump cycling.
Thank you. I appreciate your taking the time explain it again!
 
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