Adding Hose Bib on Exterior Wall - Running PEX Through Attic

Users who are viewing this thread

Cai24

New Member
Messages
29
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
New Jersey
I would like to add a hose bib for my backyard, but I don't know if there are code issues that would prevent this. I have hose access already, but it's on the other side of my house where the irrigation backflow preventer is. I'm installing drip irrigation, and if I use the existing hookup, I would have to cross doorways with the tubing.

My water lines are accessible in my laundry room. Through the ceiling, I can access my garage attic, which then leads to the exterior wall. My current lines are copper, but my plan is to run PEX. I was thinking about using an Aquor hydrant on the exterior wall, since they're so low profile. My concern is about whether the PEX is permitted in an attic, especially being in New Jersey. I would drain this during the winter months (not sure if I would need to use a compressor), but I don't know if that's sufficient for code purposes. My thought was to install a shutoff in the laundry room with a bleed valve. I could also open the valve on the exterior. I just wanted to see if this would be feasible. I'm on a slab, unfortunately, so there is no basement or crawl space access.
 

Terry

The Plumbing Wizard
Staff member
Messages
29,942
Reaction score
3,461
Points
113
Location
Bothell, Washington
Website
terrylove.com
I don't know that code for New Jersey, but here if I have pipes in an attic, I put the insulation over the lines like a blanket to trap the warm air coming up from the ceiling.

index.php
 

Cai24

New Member
Messages
29
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
New Jersey
I don't know that code for New Jersey, but here if I have pipes in an attic, I put the insulation over the lines like a blanket to trap the warm air coming up from the ceiling.

index.php
Thanks, that was actually my plan. The ceiling that this would run over is vaulted, so I was going to fish it down to the edge of the attic. Question...could I "winterize" this without a compressor? In the fall, I would drain the water from the hose bib end, and if I install a shutoff valve with drain, I could also drain at the supply side. I do have a compressor, so I guess I could use that just to be safe. My thought was that if I slope it down to the edge of the house, and slope it back to the laundry room, I could get most of the water drained just by opening the valves. I don't have a lot of experience with this though, so I could be completely wrong.
 

Jadnashua

Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx
Messages
32,770
Reaction score
1,191
Points
113
Location
New England
Just be aware that the ID of PEX is smaller than that for copper, so your available volume may end up being smaller. You might want to run 3/4" PEX, even if fed by a 1/2" supply line (assuming that's copper).

You would probably benefit from using a frost-free silcock that, if your pipe does run under the insulation ALL of the way, you may not need to drain it, but it would still probably be a good idea.

You might find the use of a valve with a drain inside might make it easier to drain the line. https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-2-in-...s-Ball-Valve-with-Drain-119-1-12-EB/205816303
 

John Gayewski

In the Trades
Messages
4,443
Reaction score
1,391
Points
113
Location
Iowa
Bigger pipe is easier to drain. The surface tension of the water will keep it in the pipe unless air has enough room to make its way in. Even with 3/4 PEX you might find that there is a large section of pipe that retains the water. Better to blow it out, especially if you use 1/2".
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks