When will my sweat joints leak?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by jok, Jan 29, 2012.

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  1. Hackney plumbing

    Hackney plumbing Homeowner

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    Alabama
    The pipe is not air tight until the solder hits the joint and by that point the air is no longer expanding. No meaningful pressure is built up after the solder hits the joint. It can barely even be measured.

    If air pressure is keeping you from making a joint then the joint is too tight. Just because a pipe is opened to atmospheric pressure does not prevent steam from blowing your joint out.

    You can if,and's or but all you want but those are the facts. Your post said "Must". I said thats false information. That is a fact.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
  2. dlarrivee

    dlarrivee New Member

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    Another salesman... why are you copying me word for word?
     
  3. BobL43

    BobL43 DIY Senior Member

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    So who buys copper pipe and fittings and uses a micrometer to insure the correct fit? :eek:
    Your test was very interesting to set up, run and for us to watch it, (I appreciate it a lot) but I think the only argument anybody is making here is that is would be good practice to make the final sweat joint with an open line somewhere in the circuit, and that alone, of course does not insure a good joint in itself.:)
     
  4. bluebinky

    bluebinky Member

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    I agree, but not necessarily if you are repairing existing plumbing. Opening a valve may aggravate water flowing back to the joint(s) you are working on.

    I think we can agree that water is the true enemy, but probably will never all agree about heated air (without lots of carefully controlled testing of many different parameters)...
     
  5. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa DIYer, not in the trades

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    Ja, just a sneaky spammer pretending to be participating only to provide a venue for the link in his sig. I hate blatant spammers and hate the sneaky kind even more.
     
  6. Hackney plumbing

    Hackney plumbing Homeowner

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    You do not need a micrometer,you need experience and good training from true professionals of the trade. I was lucky enough to be born into the trade with expert instruction since before I can remember....literally since I was born. They have pictures of me putting pvc together when I was in diapers. Its not that I have an issue with opening up a valve to the atmosphere but when guy claims " YOU MUST".......I'll call B.S. because I know better.

    I could do 1,000,000 tests and not everyone would be satisfied. Knowing fact from fiction matters in the real world and thats where I live. Let the "internet plumbers" believe what they wish.
     
  7. bluebinky

    bluebinky Member

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    By the way, thank you. I have learned from this thread.

    Based on what you have shown so far, I believe that it is quite likely you could successfully solder and pressure test a very large number of "closed" joints with 100% success. That is not my point (however, your test does have a lot of merit, and points out a *likely* myth).

    Others have reported differently -- why, we don't know. It could be chance, or it could be a measurable and repeatable difference in technique, or perhaps just flawed collective memories.

    The only way to find out would be to do controlled tests varying *all* relevant parameters, not repeating the same test over and over...
     
  8. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

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    By definition wouldn't you be an "internet plumber" too?
     
  9. Hackney plumbing

    Hackney plumbing Homeowner

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    Jan 6, 2010
    Location:
    Alabama
    No I actually work in the field everyday. When the majority of your plumbing experience is gathered from google and forums.......your an internet plumber.

    ADD> Haven't you realized by now that I'm not one of your students. Your dealing with an adult. By the way....have you learned how to test gas pressure yet or do you just size gas pipe according to what the book says it should be?
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2012
  10. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    A MONTH ago, there was a question...."when will my sweat joints leak?"
    The ANSWER: WHEN DONKEYS FLY.


    I will now close this thread. The forum is wide open, and you are all welcome to continue the shoot out at the OK Corrall!
     
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