Water Pressure Off by 5 PSI

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Chrisdeli

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Hi Everyone,

I just recently noticed my water pressure cut on is 5 psi lower than the pressure switch is set to. The switch is a 40/60 but the water pump cuts on at 35 (I hear the pressure switch click) and although cuts off at 60 the water pressure decreases to around 56 after the pump turns off (after the second "click" is heard).

I recently had the water tank, pressure gauge and pressure switch replaced after the foot valve failed. Before I noticed the foot valve failure the submersible water pump was short-cycling so this caused alot of sedimentation in the well water. After the above were replaced I noticed when running the water that the water pressure would decrease to near zero after it went below the 40 psi cut on then would fill to 60 psi. I called the tech who replaced it and he told me the water tank was overcharged from the factory and to let some air out even though it was 38 psi when I emptied the bladder. So I decreased the psi to 36 with no change. So I took out the pressure switch and cleaned it thinking maybe some sediment got trapped and this seemed to fix the problem. I did not mess with the pressure setting nuts on the pressure switch. Fast forward about 2 months now and the sediment seems to have cleared out (I have gone 2 weeks and my sediment filter is relatively clean) but the water pressure is 5 psi off as I described. One other thing there seems to be a 4 second delay between when the water pump turns on (I hear the pressure switch click at 35 psi) and the water pressure begins to rise. It takes about 2 minutes and 40 seconds for the water pressure to reach 60 psi and about 10 seconds for it to fall to 56 psi where it stabilizes. I do know that the water tank is overcharged at 36 psi if the cut on is 35 (should be 33 psi I think). I checked the air charge via the Schraeder valve and it is the same as what the water gauge reads.

I am OK with this set up if it won't cause any harm to the system but if it does please let me know how to fix. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

Reach4

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With the pump off, and the water pressure maybe 50- or 40-something, what does the air pressure read, and what does the water pressure read. This test is to compare calibration of the air pressure gauge and the water pressure gauge.

Regarding pressure drop after cutoff, see https://terrylove.com/forums/index....i-lose-3-5-lbs-of-pressure-at-cut-off.67940/#

Not related to your symptoms, I suggest that you flush the sediment from the pressure tank.
Precharged Pressure tank flush:
1. Connect a hose to the sediment drain valve, and run that to where you plan to drain the water. I suggest filtering the output through a cloth if you suspect the sediment may include sand.
2. Turn off the pump.
3. Open the drain valve, and let it drain until the water stops. It would be possibly interesting to watch the first water that comes out.
4. Close the valve, and turn the pump back on, and let pressure build.
5. Repeat steps 2, 3 and 4 as needed.
 

Chrisdeli

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Sounds like the check valve on the submersible is not holding. If you have another check at the tank, remove or disable it.
Thank you. I forgot to mention in the original post that the failed foot valve was not replaced. A new check valve was instead placed in the pvc piping in the well head. There is no other second check valve. I know this is not ideal. The current submersible pump is 11 years old so I will have the foot valve replaced when I replace the pump in the next few years. I may just have to bite the bullet and have the foot valve replaced now rather than wait for the pump to be replaced.
 

Chrisdeli

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With the pump off, and the water pressure maybe 50- or 40-something, what does the air pressure read, and what does the water pressure read. This test is to compare calibration of the air pressure gauge and the water pressure gauge.

Regarding pressure drop after cutoff, see https://terrylove.com/forums/index....i-lose-3-5-lbs-of-pressure-at-cut-off.67940/#

Not related to your symptoms, I suggest that you flush the sediment from the pressure tank.
Precharged Pressure tank flush:
1. Connect a hose to the sediment drain valve, and run that to where you plan to drain the water. I suggest filtering the output through a cloth if you suspect the sediment may include sand.
2. Turn off the pump.
3. Open the drain valve, and let it drain until the water stops. It would be possibly interesting to watch the first water that comes out.
4. Close the valve, and turn the pump back on, and let pressure build.
5. Repeat steps 2, 3 and 4 as needed.
Thank you. I will try this. To make sure I do it right- When you say "with the pump off" do you mean to turn off the water pump via the circuit breaker or just make sure it is not running (i.e., filling the water tank)?
 

Reach4

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For that pressure comparison, no need to turn off the breaker. Not running is all that is needed.
 

Valveman

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Thank you. I forgot to mention in the original post that the failed foot valve was not replaced. A new check valve was instead placed in the pvc piping in the well head. There is no other second check valve. I know this is not ideal. The current submersible pump is 11 years old so I will have the foot valve replaced when I replace the pump in the next few years. I may just have to bite the bullet and have the foot valve replaced now rather than wait for the pump to be replaced.
The only check valve you want is the one on the submersible pump. Any other check valves further up cause problems. The vacuum between those two checks with the one at the bottom leaking is what causes the delay in water after the pump starts. You are lucky air isn't blowing glasses out of your hand at the faucets. Starting a pump under vacuum and the water hammer that happens after it hits the upper check valve are both hard on the pump.
 
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