Water hammer after plumber came

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jean55

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A couple of week ago a plumber came out for a couple of minor things--unplugged dishwasher drain and checked out shutoff valve (only had to tighten the packing nut) on the toilet and showed me how to turn off water at the street, cuz our main shutoff is frozen. He then did a few minor repairs on the toilet, even though I didn't request it---replaced a washer in the fluidmaster fill valve and the flapper.

After that we noticed a water hammer problem at the toilet. Closing the shutoff valve 1/2 helps. We've had minor water hammer in the past but it definitely got worse. Yesterday I decided to replace the washing machine hoses and a previously minor cold water hammer problem became severe, I'm afraid to use it. Just installed an arrester at the cold line to the washing machine and that does not help at all.

Could the plumber have opened the water valve at the street "wider" resulting in more pressure, thus creating more hammer? Should I try closing that part way?

Could I have damaged the washing machine cold-valve in tryng to remove the old hose? I did have to use a lot of pressure to get it off the machine.

Should I call the plumber back? He seemed like a nice guy but he charged $140 for those few things--he hasn't yet cashed the check.
 

Cass

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Nothing the plumber did created the water hammer...call him back and tell him about it and see what he has to say....as you said "We've had minor water hammer in the past..."
 
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Terry

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Before the plumber came out:

If your toilet flapper was leaking, the fill valve would constantly be refilling the bowl very slowly.
When that happens, you don't get a hard shutoff, like you do when there are no leaks.

A lot of my older customers can't hear the toilets in their homes leaking.
When I mention that they are wasting a lot of waster, they think I'm trying to sell them on something.
When they get their next water bill, then it's:

"How quick can you come out and repair the toilets? My water bill last month was very high!"

Now that the flapper is new, the system is tight.

Fluidmaster fill valves will hammer a bit on a non-leaking system.
It's part of the design.

Now that you are saving money on your water bill, you should give the savings to your plumber for a tip.





 
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jean55

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Thanks for the info all of you provided. I finally changed the washing machine hoses, AGAIN. Returned the new steel reinforced ones and got the plain, black rubber ones and we now have no more clunking when the cold water shuts off on our 15 yo Kenmore washer. (Found someone with the same problem when I did a google search.)

As for the toilet, the water hammer is much less with the shutoff valve closed about 3/4 of the way, so that's where we're leaving it.

Although we were told our water pressure is fine, I'll request that it be checked the next time we need a plumber.
 

Cass

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Bad move removing the braided SS hoses going to the washing machine ...the new rubber ones are taking the water hammer by slightly expanding and most likely moving...this is a recipe for disaster as the excess pressure could cause them to blow out...what you have done is masked the problem...it is still there...you may need a PRV and expansion tank...the rubber hoses bursting cause more floods than you are aware of...
 

jadnashua

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There are hammer arrestors made for hooking up to your washing machine - cost about $12 each and available at HD and Lowes. They screw on like a hose, then you hook the hose up to them...takes all of a minute or so and should solve the problem correctly.

Also, while I realize most people probably dont' do it, it is a REALLY good idea to shut the water off to the washing machine when you aren't actually using it. When, not if, the hoses burst, its much better to have it happen when you are at least checking on it occasionally.
 

Dahlman

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If I am reading this correctly, you are experiencing water hammer at BOTH your toilet and your washing machine. In such case, I suggest that you should install AA water hammer arresters at each location.

Sioux Chief makes tees with integral arresters that will piggy-back/retrofit onto the existing shut-off valves in both circumstances. Dahl also makes 1/4 valves with integral arresters for both, but they are only sold through wholesalers in the USA, whereas the Sioux Chief products should be available at local retailers.

The braided connectors at the washing machine appear to have revealed how much water hammer the original rubber hoses were concealing, so I would agree that reverting back to the rubber hoses is not the solution.

water_hammer_dahl.jpg


water-hammer-valves-fittings.jpg
 
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