Toto Fill Valve in American Standard Toilet

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SAS

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I have an American Standard toilet that fills quite slowly. It's a 1.68 gallon flush and takes nearly 2 minutes to fill. By contrast my Drake 1.68 gallon fills in about 45 seconds. The current fill valve in the American Standard is a Fluidmaster 400. I took off the cap to clean the valve, but there was no sediment, and it did not change the fill time. As it turns out, I have an extra Toto TSU99A.X fill valve on hand. Is there any reason I shouldn't just pop that into the American Standard toilet? Although it says Toto on it, I believe it's the same as a Korky model that is marketed as a replacement for any brand of toilet in which it will fit.
 

Reach4

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Sounds good, but you might try this first:
 

SAS

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I installed the Toto fill valve without any problems, and the fill is a bit faster but still much slower than the 3 other toilets in the house. I timed it at 1:30. It's a 1.6 gallon flush just like 2 of the other toilets which are Toto toilets with the same fill valve I just installed in the American Standard. Since it's the same amount of water that needs to be refilled, and it's the same fill valve, why does it take about 50% longer to fill?
 

Reach4

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Longer, smaller, supply water path? Higher elevation?
 

SAS

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Longer, smaller, supply water path? Higher elevation?
The piping is the same in size, but you're right it is a longer path to an upper floor. I hadn't taken that into account. The other toilet on the upper floor fills a bit more quickly, but the big difference is between the one on the main floor and the one in question.

Thanks for your answer; this was really puzzling me.
 

Left_behind

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possibly debris stuck in the pipe/angle stop? disconnect the supply and note the flow from the angle stop vs upstairs' flow. this will eliminate the toilets and test "before the toilet".

from there, you can flush out the angle stop if it has a removable packing nut, or removed the angle stop and flush. a bit more entailed, but ya gotta do what ya gotta do if it bothers you that much.
 

SAS

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possibly debris stuck in the pipe/angle stop? disconnect the supply and note the flow from the angle stop vs upstairs' flow. this will eliminate the toilets and test "before the toilet".

from there, you can flush out the angle stop if it has a removable packing nut, or removed the angle stop and flush. a bit more entailed, but ya gotta do what ya gotta do if it bothers you that much.
It's quite possible that the angle stop is part of the problem. I replaced the old angle stops under the sink in that bathroom, and the faucet water pressure improved significantly. As it stands now, my wife is hinting that she would like me to replace the toilet, so I think I'll just replace the stop at the same time.
 

jadnashua

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It's pretty simple to change the stop valve, especially if it's a compression fit. (Well, a threaded valve is maybe even easier, but you don't see them that often anymore). I'd change that now unless you can't get to it without removing the toilet.
 

SAS

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It's pretty simple to change the stop valve, especially if it's a compression fit. (Well, a threaded valve is maybe even easier, but you don't see them that often anymore). I'd change that now unless you can't get to it without removing the toilet.
You're probably right; I should just change the valve now. This is an especially easy one as it sits about 6 inches above the floor on a vertical cpvc pipe.
 
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Left_behind

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You're probably right; I should just change the valve now. This is an especially easy one as it sits about 6 inches above the floor on a vertical cpvc pipe.
if its a compression type (assuming you're running copper), and it's a "Straight Stop" as opposed to an angle stop. you may be able to troubleshoot the volume/pressure by removing the guts of the stop, then having someone turn on the water while you monitor the outcome.
yes, a bit messy, but...
if you have the time and $$, then just changing the valve is an option.
 
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