Temporary fix of a very small leak in a kitchen sink drain pipe attached to the jbend

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by carlegeo, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. carlegeo

    carlegeo New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2011
    Location:
    California
    I'm a complete amateur but want to try to see if a temporary fix would help
    for a small, I guess pinhole or a bit larger leak in drain pipe under kitchen
    sink that is attached to the jbend - this pipe screws into a larger one
    and then that larger one goes behind the wall.
    (its a metal, not a plastic one)

    I don't want to do anything with the first temporary fix that might not
    allow a handyman to try something else if my fix does not work.

    I bought the rescue tape (silicone tape), the plumbing repair clamps
    (with the rubber inside) and various epoxies or glues that are supposed
    to work with this situation.

    1. Should I try the rescue tape first since if it does not work, the clamp
    with the rubber might still go over that ?

    2. Might the clamp however, exert too much pressure on this pipe that since its
    old might cause it to crumble or break in other places ?

    3. Am guessing that once the epoxy or glue is over the hole, then using the clamp
    or tape would not be effective since it would not be able to be against a flush surface to compress ?

    4. And don't know if this is true, but read that since there is not as much water
    pressure in the drain pipe as in the inlet pipes, that maybe one of these temporary
    fixes might work ?

    Yes, I know the proper way probably is to replace the pipe but on a budget
    and that the non jbend end of the pipe screws into the larger pipe and could
    be more complex to get off and which would be way outside my ability.

    Thanks for suggestions or ideas.
     
  2. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2004
    Location:
    Yakima, WA
    The tape might give you an OK temporary fix. Nothing lost by trying. I assume your use of "j bend" is what is properly call a P trap. These are sold in any hardware store and are certainly not expensive. The point of entry to the larger pipe is via an adapter made for the purpose and should be reusable. Tools needed for replacement are fairly basic. Channel lock pliers and/or a small pipe wrench that will allow you to remove the nuts securing the trap. These nuts are seldom torqued very tightly, just a bit more than hand tight is usually sufficient so you really don't need to apply great force to remove and replace the assembly. There is a right way to assemble the trap, this is usually shown on the package the trap comes in.
     
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  4. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; I don't want to do anything with the first temporary fix that might not
    allow a handyman to try something else if my fix does not work.

    I have never seen any repair that a handyman did not think he was good enough to fix it better. When a metal trap part develops a hole, it will not be the only one. Usually the entire metal around it is soft enough that you can break it by pressing with your finger. Anything that stops the leak will be temporary so use whatever works the easiest.
     
  5. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    Billy May's miracle tape is actually a pretty good product. So if your 'rescue' tape is the stretchy black stuff, that will probably gain you some time. Don't use any epoxy pipe wrap or any other kind of glues or adhesives, as these will necessitate the replacement of all the pipes since they are not removable. You probably need to just replace all the pipes anyway. About an hour job for a good plumber, with $25 worth of material ( about what the patch will cost???)
     
  6. carlegeo

    carlegeo New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2011
    Location:
    California
    Thanks to all for your comments and suggestions.

    I also purchased a couple of pipe repair clamps with the rubber gasket,
    that get tightened down over the pipe.

    Could there be a problem in doing this that the pressure of tightening
    it over the pipe might put stress on the pipe that could cause it to
    break or have other cracks develop ?


    If this is ok/reasonable to try, could it be done after trying the
    silicone tape (rescue tape was in the store I went to) --
    or would using the tape result in not a good seal for the rubber
    gasket of the pipe clamp ?

    Thanks again.
     
  7. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2004
    Location:
    Yakima, WA
    A drain is not under pressure, so I think you rubber gasket and clamps is overkill for a small leak. You run the risk of tightening too much and crushing the pipe. I'd go with the tape if you can replace the trap immediately. You're over thinking this job. No patch is going to be permanent, so don't waste time and money on it. A really quick and inexpensive way to get by for a few days is to put a pan under the leak to catch the drip. It will only drip when is sink is draining, and it should be easy to catch in a pan or bucket.
     
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