Tear Up My DWV Diagram!

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Lyz

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Hi everyone!
I am new here and this is my first time posting. Nice to meet you all, and thanks for reading.

I am working on building a bathroom. I am in Arkansas and from what I can find, the codes here are based on the 2006 IPC.

Anyway, I drew up a diagram and this is what I came up with. Does it look ok, or maybe I am crazy? Feel free to advise, critique, laugh, scream, rant, or cry.

Are there some glaring problems that I am missing?
Are my vents in the correct place?
Are my fittings all right?
What placement/fittings would you use instead, where, and why?

These two pictures are for reference to the space, and at the bottom is my diagram.

closet bend hole.jpg


room space.jpg


Maybe this diagram looks like it was drawn by a child.
I am an actual adult, I promise.
To clear up any confusion, the vanity is going in on the opposite wall to the toilet, and the shower is going in the corner to the left of the vanity.
Thank again, y'all!

DWV Design.jpg
 

Tuttles Revenge

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The shower needs its own vent for its trap. I'm not an expert in IPC rules, but I believe the vent must maintain vertical until it rises to at least 6" above the flood level of the shower fixture.

You have to you should attempt to reduce the number of degrees of turn those drain takes.
 

Lyz

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The shower needs its own vent for its trap. I'm not an expert in IPC rules, but I believe the vent must maintain vertical until it rises to at least 6" above the flood level of the shower fixture.

You have to you should attempt to reduce the number of degrees of turn those drain takes.

Thanks for replying! I sort of redid the design superimposed on a picture here:
DWV design take two.jpg

From the sink p-trap I am kind of stuck running along the top of the slab towards the shower drain line. I guess I have to have some drops and turns there to meet up with the shower drain line. Do you think it would be better to use two 45s instead of 2 90s to reduce the degree of turn?

Thank you again =)
 

Lyz

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I do not think I have EVER installed a system using that many l/s 90s.
Thank you for your response! I have never installed ANY system, so your feedback is quite valuable. I have sort of redesigned the system in an attempt to reduce the amount of l/s 90s. Here is a new picture of it:

DWV design take two.jpg


There is a big drop between the sink drain line and where it must connect to shower line. Would it be better here to use 2 45s instead of the 90s? Thanks =)
 

Breplum

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on the left the fittings that you possibly can use are simply a 3 x 2 combo (which is a wye and eight bend together as one fitting), laid on its side it picks up the drain coming from the shower. If not that, then the 90 only needs to be a standard 90 or street 90.
Any horizontal run greater than five ft. needs a cleanout.
45s are better than 90s.
Long sweeps when transitioning from vert. to horiz drainage. The vents only need be 1-1/2" for shower or lav.
I do NOT recommend plastic flange for the WC. Use stainless steel flanged, like Sioux Chief makes.
 

wwhitney

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Is the floor system in the area by the shower different from the area by the vanity, or have you just not pulled up the subfloor there yet?

How about a layout like in the picture below, where red is 1-1/2" minimum, blue is 2" and green is 3"? The lav vent wet vents the showers and WC. It's possible the 3" should run all the way to the cleanout, not sure about that part.

Everything in the floor system would be at just one constant 2% pitch with no vertical jogs. The fittings required for the portion drawn, going downstream from the lav, are: 1-1/2" san-tee, 2" cleanout fitting with 1-1/2" x 2" bushing, 2" LT 90, 2" combo (wye + 45), 3x3x2 combo, and a 3" quarter bend for the WC closet bend (or a 4x3 closet bend).

Also, Arkansas's plumbing code is apparently based on the 2006 IPC, I'm only familiar with the more recent version, so I'm assuming that the basic aspects haven't changed.

Cheers, Wayne


room space.jpg
 

Lyz

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on the left the fittings that you possibly can use are simply a 3 x 2 combo (which is a wye and eight bend together as one fitting), laid on its side it picks up the drain coming from the shower. If not that, then the 90 only needs to be a standard 90 or street 90.
Any horizontal run greater than five ft. needs a cleanout.
45s are better than 90s.
Long sweeps when transitioning from vert. to horiz drainage. The vents only need be 1-1/2" for shower or lav.
I do NOT recommend plastic flange for the WC. Use stainless steel flanged, like Sioux Chief makes.

Thanks for your response and all your suggestions! Do you recommend replacing our current wye & l/s 90 with the combo wye? Also, I didn't know that about the horizontal runs greater than 5 ft needing a cleanout. Should I put a cleanout on the 2" shower/vanity line? And if you were me, where would you put the cleanout?
 

Lyz

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Is the floor system in the area by the shower different from the area by the vanity, or have you just not pulled up the subfloor there yet?

How about a layout like in the picture below, where red is 1-1/2" minimum, blue is 2" and green is 3"? The lav vent wet vents the showers and WC. It's possible the 3" should run all the way to the cleanout, not sure about that part.

Everything in the floor system would be at just one constant 2% pitch with no vertical jogs. The fittings required for the portion drawn, going downstream from the lav, are: 1-1/2" san-tee, 2" cleanout fitting with 1-1/2" x 2" bushing, 2" LT 90, 2" combo (wye + 45), 3x3x2 combo, and a 3" quarter bend for the WC closet bend (or a 4x3 closet bend).

Also, Arkansas's plumbing code is apparently based on the 2006 IPC, I'm only familiar with the more recent version, so I'm assuming that the basic aspects haven't changed.

Cheers, Wayne


View attachment 74423
Hi, Thanks so much for your response!
So the floor system is very different between the two spaces, on the shower area there is an open crawlspace and around the toilet and the vanity is a slab. The floor joists are 2x4, so we have just 5 inches of space between the slab and the flooring to work with. So with that, it won't be possible to achieve the slope required for the piping to run across the bathroom (without way more jackhammering than I am physically and mentally capable of). Just for better understanding, here is a picture of the rough plan for the toilet plumbing taken from the crawlspace.

Thank you again =)

toilet rough.jpg
 

wwhitney

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Ah. But I think the idea I drew would still work if you moved the vertical line I drew (which represents both the vertical lav drain/vent in the wall, and the horizontal drain in the floor area, running perpendicular to the joists) to the left to be just over the crawl space area. Assuming I got the fixture locations correct.

The WC is over the slab area? But you'll have enough height for a closet bend, closet flange, and the fall needed to get the drain to the crawl space area without hitting the slab?

Cheers, Wayne
 
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