Sweating a Shower Valve

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by newmex999, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. newmex999

    newmex999 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    nm
    Any tips/tricks for sweating in a new shower valve?

    I haven't done any sweating in many years, so just want to make sure I have my bases covered.

    What are the general sweating procedures?
    Does the valve need to be mounted to 2x4, or can it be supported by the 1/2 copper pipe?
    When sweating, should the valve be in any particular position- open/closed, to prevent pressure build up?
    How far forward do you position the valve to allow for hardieboard and tile installation?

    Thank allot!
     
  2. shacko

    shacko Master Plumber-Gas Fitter

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2006
    Occupation:
    Master Plumber-Gas Fitter
    Location:
    Rosedale, Md
    If you have a valve with screwed connections you should solder adaptors on pieces of tube and then screw them into the valve.

    If you have a sweat valve you should remove the mechanism before you sweat the tube in; if you can't do that wrap some wet rags around it to proctect the valve.

    The valve should have come with a plastic spacer that shows where the finish wall should be; YOU HAVE TO ADD THE MEASURMENTS UP.

    You are always better off if you use a board to secure your valve.
     
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  4. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Most plumbers will remove the cartridge while soldering, and reassemble when done.

    All fittings need to be open to air during the soldering process.
    Otherwise, the hot air will blow a path through the solder and cause a leak.
    That's why some "unlucky" plumbers always have a leak on the last joint they solder.
    You can't teach these young dogs old tricks.
    They just keep messing up their joints by soldering in a closed system.

    The nice thing about pulling the cartridge, you can heat the body easier and get the heat even.
    A cold spot wont' melt solder.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2010
  5. newmex999

    newmex999 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    nm
    Type L or M

    Should I be using type L or M copper pipe?
     
  6. JOHN_P

    JOHN_P New Member

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    Mar 8, 2010
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
  7. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    That depends on local water.
    In Seattle, we use mainly M inside.
    Some places require L if the water is corrosive.

    In my experience, often if the water is that corrosive, then the fittings go bad too.
    But it never hurts to upgrade to L

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2010
  8. newmex999

    newmex999 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    nm
    Solder & Flux

    Are there different types of solder and flux available for use out there?

    If so, which ones are recommended?

    Thanks much!
     
  9. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Lead Free solders are good.
    I like Bridgit Lead Free
    Oatey Lead Free


    Everflux,Water Soluable
    Laco 95/5 Flux
    Laco Flux-Rite 90 Water Soluable
     
  10. newmex999

    newmex999 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    nm
    Water and Sweating

    How do you pros keep that little bit of water from running down inside the pipe towards the area where you are sweating?

    I heard someone talking about rolling a ball of white bread and pushing it into the pipe to keep any water from weakening the solder joint?
     
  11. nhmaster

    nhmaster Master Plumber

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    Occupation:
    Tech. Instructor
    Location:
    S. Maine
    check your state and local code for pipe schedule. My state ammended the code years back to type L for water supply only.
     
  12. newmex999

    newmex999 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    nm
    Sorry for posting this again, but never received response

    How do you pros keep that little bit of water from running down inside the pipe towards the area where you are sweating?

    I heard someone talking about rolling a ball of white bread and pushing it into the pipe to keep any water from weakening the solder joint?
     
  13. bsperr

    bsperr Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2008
    Location:
    Athens, GA
    I'm no pro, but I've used a product called "plumber's bread" to stop the trickle of water while sweating. It's a pre-cut cornstarch plug that will dissolve when the water is cut back on. It worked pretty well.
     
  14. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Yuu can use the white bread, but you are better off not doing that.

    When you turn the water off, open ever valve, faucet and shower head you can.
    Everywhere.
    As long as a valve is turned off, it's like holding a finger on the top of a straw,
    The water never drains out.
    You need the water to drain, so open everything up.

    If the water doesn't stop in 15 minutes, then try the bread.
     
  15. asktom

    asktom Member

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    Nov 9, 2009
    Location:
    Victor, MT
    Cheap white bread, no crust. Flush the system well when done.
     
  16. newmex999

    newmex999 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    nm
    Flux with Tin or Not

    I was in the local box store the other day and they have water soluble flux and then there is a flux with "tin" in it.

    Which one is preferred?
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2010
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