Running Washer Drain Into Utility Sink

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walkingmiller

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Hello!

First of all, this forum has been incredibly helpful as I work through home renovations. Thank you all for your time and advice!

Now onto my specific question - I am moving our washer and dryer to the other side of our laundry room (we are expanding a bathroom, so we have to move it), and there is already a sink drain (1 1/2" pvc) on the wall where we are going to be moving the laundry setup. Unfortunately, it is on the 2nd floor of the house, and changing out the 1 1/2" pipe for a 2" pipe would require cutting a larger hole through the bottom plate on the 2nd floor and 1st floor and running new 2" pipe down into the basement (plus potentially dealing with adding a standpipe that is larger than the space between the wall studs). As a potential solution, I am thinking about just putting in a utility sink and draining the washer into the utility sink. Unfortunately, my wife isn't terribly happy with how a black hose running over this sink would look in the space, so I am trying to figure out ways to make it look better.

I would love to just run the washer drain into the utility sink drain directly, but I have read that if the utility sink doesn't use 2" pipe, I wouldn't be code compliant. I think my big question has to do with this reasoning. I understand that the 1 1/2" sink drain might not be able to handle the new washer discharge and would back up, but wouldn't the backup simply go up into the sink and drain at its own pace (similar to if we were to run the drain hose over the edge of the sink)? Or, would there be issues with the discharge getting pushed back to the washer? Also, I assume the 2" requirement (if I were to drain directly into the sink drain) includes the entire length of the pipe down to the main stack, correct? I can't just use 2" on the utility sink drain and then hook it into the 1 1/2" pipe that goes down the walls?

A few other details that might be helpful:
  • The sink drain is vented.
  • There is nothing else on this drain line until you get down into the basement. It goes 100% vertically from the sink to the basement (probably 15 feet), then runs horizontally and hooks into a line that also has the kitchen sink on it.
Thank you everyone for your help! Let me know if I need to provide more details!

I am also open to other ideas if you have them :)

walkingmiller
 

WorthFlorida

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If the utility sink is deep or large enough to whole the water back as it drains, there is no code violation that I know of. The only issue is if your laundry creates a lot of lint it can plug up the strainer of the sink. Children clothes seems to generate a lot of lint. HE machines uses far less water per fill so having a large single dump of water, say 10-15 gallons, is not very common anymore. But your wife is more right about dumping the water in a sink. It's loud and emits more odors from detergents, bleach and fabric softeners.

Are you sure this sink drain pipe is 1.5" past the trap arm? Bathroom sinks use 1.25" traps, other sinks use 1.5" traps and usually discharge into a 2" pipe at the wall. Is it possible to extend the existing laundry connection over to the new location? Who is doing the bathroom remodel plumbing? Are there any doors between the new location and the old location where a 2" pipe can be run through the walls? Is this sink original to the home or maybe it was added by a previous owner and tapped into a vent pipe?
 

Reach4

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Unfortunately, my wife isn't terribly happy with how a black hose running over this sink would look in the space, so I am trying to figure out ways to make it look better.
You can get drain lines in colors other than black. Or you could wrap your existing line in a colored plastic tape.

I would love to just run the washer drain into the utility sink drain directly, but I have read that if the utility sink doesn't use 2" pipe, I wouldn't be code compliant.
Not so. 1.5 for laundry sinks is fine per codes that I know of. The sink adds a storage buffer. Do use a lint catcher of some sort. Kansas uses IPC. Even if you ran a 2 inch standpipe, it would not be permitted to join other drainage in a 2 inch pipe. You would need to run the standpipe drainage alone in 2 inch until you got to a 3 inch.

Even if the code changed in the future, your existing sink would be grandfathered if it was code when plumbed.
 
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wwhitney

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Unfortunately, my wife isn't terribly happy with how a black hose running over this sink would look in the space, so I am trying to figure out ways to make it look better.
Is the washer on the same wall as the laundry sink? And how far apart are they? Maybe you can move the laundry sink closer to the washer, so less hose is exposed. Also, there are some white clothes washer extension hoses, you might be able to change out the hose for a white one, if that would help.

Kansas uses the IPC, per up.codes. The IPC allows the laundry sink on a 1-1/2" drain, but requires a 2" trap for a laundry standpipe. I guess the concern is that if a washer can pump out water faster than a 1-1/2" trap can pass it, the water will back up in the standpipe and overflow there, rather than backflow into your sink.

So I don't think it makes sense to try a standpipe. You could of course do one all in 1-1/2" and see if it overflows. The IPC allows a single vent to be used for two fixtures (common vent), so the standpipe drain should join the sink drain before the vent takeoff.

Cheers, Wayne
 
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Aaroninnh

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Hello!

As a potential solution, I am thinking about just putting in a utility sink and draining the washer into the utility sink. Unfortunately, my wife isn't terribly happy with how a black hose running over this sink would look in the space, so I am trying to figure out ways to make it look better.

walkingmiller

This is what I did. The standpipe that came with our house was far too high due to the height of the septic tank. The washer hose would barely reach, but it did. Took me a couple of years to figure out why we kept blowing washing machine drain pumps...was just too high for the pump to push against.

I instead put in a Mustee Utilatwin dual utility/laundry sink next to the washer and used a small tank/lifter pump system from the big box store meant for a utility sink. Has worked great for 15+ years and I haven't had to replace a washer pump since (although I am on my third lifter pump), and I enjoy have a laundry/utility sink.

As to the hose, I believe you are supposed to secure it so it doesnt fly off. I never had that happen, but at one point I installed a special mustee fitting meant specifically for this purpose. They call it the "Handiflo" water-discharge fitting. You drill a hole in the back of the sink up near the top and install this. On the back is a pipe and clamp to securely attach your washer hose to. It no longer hangs over the side of the sink, looks better, is held securely, and doesn't splash as much.

Here is a link to it with a picture.

https://www.supplyhouse.com/Mustee-M94700-Handiflo-Water-Discharge-Fitting-14227000-p

Edit: Looks like that part was discontinued, but hopefully it gives you some ideas.
 
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