Log Cabin Renovation

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Catan

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Hello All,
I'm new to the forum and have been learning a lot from the questions and responses during my renovation of a log cabin. I'm a retired engineer, but a real newbie when it comes to proper plumbing and doing things right. I think my questions are simple, due to the small size of the cabin, but just want to get some seasoned feedback.
My main question is on venting (the current plumbing has none). The bathroom plumbing is primarily on one wall (upstairs & downstairs). I've attached two options to add venting to both bathrooms, but concerned about proper venting of upstairs tub using a wet vent for downstairs toilet. I can add some vents through floor to attic, but would like to minimize penetration of upstairs floor as it's just 2x6 T&G pine.
Option 1 is a less intrusive solution, but not sure if tub will be properly vented because initial horizontal vent is below spill line of tub (ties into stack in attic).
Option 2 adds a vent into attic and ties to main stack.
Both options use a wet vent between upstairs tub and downstairs toilet??

If anyone has feedback it would be much appreciated!
OPTION 1.jpg
OPTION 2.jpg
 

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Terry

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There is no wet venting between floors. That's a good way to siphon your traps dry. Not what you want to have happen.
Wet venting is for same floor bathrooms.
Fixtures that aren't allowed on a wet vent are: Kitchens, Bar sinks, Washers, Laundry trays.
You can dry vent those, you will need to.

Fixtures on the same floor you can wet vent are: Tub, Shower, Lav, Water Closet (toilet)

dwv_b1.jpg


An example of two bathrooms using wet vents that are stacked, notice how each floor is on it's own for the waste side, but the vents from below can tie in above the flood level of the next floor.

A tub or shower can come in above the toilet, using the toilet vent for it's drain.
The lav can also come in above a toilet.
 

Catan

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Thank you, that makes sense. I updated the design with separate venting. If you see any way to optimize design and reduce floor penetration that would be great. I'm limited on how much combining I can do in the walls due to geometry of wall, electrical boxes, etc. Thanks for the feedback.
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Tuttles Revenge

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Having plumbed some fancy log homes, I feel your pain.

In new installations the design usually has a mechanical room or something that a stick framed wall allows the plumbing to pass through in an area that doesn't need to look Loggy.
 
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