HELP! Utility sink to washer stand pipe rough-in inside the garage

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jdmstop

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Hello fellow experts/ forum members:

This old home always had a utility sink that serve as the washer drain inside my garage, since I'm doing a remodel, I would like to get some advices from you all on the best way of adding washer stand pipe/ vent/ trap to the original waste drain.

I've saw many rough in idea here on the forum, however, my dilemma is that the 2 inch cast iron waste drain comes out at a 90degree horizontal setting from the stucco wall and isn't near the 2x4 wall.

My current setup is a utility sink to the left side and stackable washer and dryer on the right side of the space. I would like to maintain the current layout but convert the utility sink into a hand wash sink with a small table top and that's why I'm considering to have a dedicated washer stand pipe style drain.I would like to use the current drain for the new utility sink/counter while tie in a washer stand pipe/trap/vent rough into the wall.

Any advice or rough in ideas will be greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance!


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Tuttles Revenge

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If you have a 2" drain there, then you can add a dedicated washing machine drain. If not, then I would stick with the sink being the drain of the clothes washer. I've seen some washer machines hooked up to 1.5" drains but they can potentially not handle the flow that a clothes washer dumps.

In my area, all cast iron from the ground work / under slab is 2" so I think theres hope.

What is your intended layout for the laundry area with sink and clothes washer? Are you reusing the existing sink? how tall and how deep is that sink? In order to determine where your drains need to be you need to know where the fixtures will want to be installed.
 

jdmstop

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If you have a 2" drain there, then you can add a dedicated washing machine drain. If not, then I would stick with the sink being the drain of the clothes washer. I've seen some washer machines hooked up to 1.5" drains but they can potentially not handle the flow that a clothes washer dumps.

In my area, all cast iron from the ground work / under slab is 2" so I think theres hope.

What is your intended layout for the laundry area with sink and clothes washer? Are you reusing the existing sink? how tall and how deep is that sink? In order to determine where your drains need to be you need to know where the fixtures will want to be installed.


I have a 2 inch cast iron drain pipe there as pictured. my intended layout is the same as before, which is utility sink with counter space to the left side and stackable washer and dryer on the right side. The cast iron drain pipe as pictured is approximately 12 inches from the floor. the utility sink will be about 36 inches in height and the laundry box will be installed at 40 inches from the floor. Currently, I have a utility sink with p trap that's hook up to the drain pipe, however, I would like to retain the sink drain with wye or suitable connection that will direct me towards to back wall for a stand pipe setup along with a sink drain.

Thank you
 

wwhitney

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It would be much simpler to stick with a laundry sink with the clothes washer discharging into the sink. I bet you could find something that would fit in a cabinet and allow you to have counter space around the laundry sink, along with a reasonable way to get the clothes washer discharge into the sink. But if you want to go ahead with a separate laundry standpipe:

Are you trying to do this without opening up the stucco around the existing drain and cleanout? Because if you are going to open that up, you can rework the DWV and have a lot of flexibility.

If you don't want to open it up, I think you can still do what you want correctly (UPC compliant). If you remove all the existing plastic, you have two threaded entries. The lower entry needs to be 2" and would be your standpipe trap arm connection. Going upstream from the cast iron, you'd have male adapter, long turn 90, pipe into the 2x4 wall, trap (two pieces rotated 90 degrees from planar), standpipe.

The upper entry would be your sink connection and needs to be at least 1-1/2". You'd need to check that the entry isn't too high for your sink. You'd have a short vertical wet vent between the two entries, which is why the lower entry has to be the standpipe. UPC only allows 1 and 2 DFU fixtures on the upper connection for a vertical wet vent, while the laundry standpipe is 3 DFUs under the UPC.

Cheers, Wayne
 

jdmstop

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It would be much simpler to stick with a laundry sink with the clothes washer discharging into the sink. I bet you could find something that would fit in a cabinet and allow you to have counter space around the laundry sink, along with a reasonable way to get the clothes washer discharge into the sink. But if you want to go ahead with a separate laundry standpipe:

Are you trying to do this without opening up the stucco around the existing drain and cleanout? Because if you are going to open that up, you can rework the DWV and have a lot of flexibility.

If you don't want to open it up, I think you can still do what you want correctly (UPC compliant). If you remove all the existing plastic, you have two threaded entries. The lower entry needs to be 2" and would be your standpipe trap arm connection. Going upstream from the cast iron, you'd have male adapter, long turn 90, pipe into the 2x4 wall, trap (two pieces rotated 90 degrees from planar), standpipe.

The upper entry would be your sink connection and needs to be at least 1-1/2". You'd need to check that the entry isn't too high for your sink. You'd have a short vertical wet vent between the two entries, which is why the lower entry has to be the standpipe. UPC only allows 1 and 2 DFU fixtures on the upper connection for a vertical wet vent, while the laundry standpipe is 3 DFUs under the UPC.

Cheers, Wayne


Wayne,

Thanks for your time. So when you say two threaded entries, the upper one as pictured, you meant the "clean out plug"? I was hoping the washer standpipe would be situated in the walls instead though. Perhaps I'm missing something?
 

wwhitney

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Well, if you want the laundry box to be in the currently open 2x4 wall, and all the DWV in the walls, you'll either have to open up the stucco wall, or the slab.

If you are going to install a base cabinet in the corner, and if the existing drain and cleanout plug are under, say 21" from the corner as they appear to be, then you could save the trouble of opening the stucco or the slab if you are willing to have exposed DWV inside a 24" deep base cabinet, as I outlined.

Unless I misunderstand what you are trying to do.

Cheers, Wayne
 
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