Funny plumbing fail - advice on offset flange

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bens

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I'm used to failing the first time through but this one wound up looking like such a noob job I had to share it.
I knew it was bad as soon as it happened and just had to laugh.
I cut the last piece and thought I could jam the flange with the street elbow together with the rest of the run in time - but glue hardened up on me and it was a no-go. Essentially I feel like I'm not sure how to line up the hole on the floor properly with the stack.

1) So here's the main question - given the odd 45 degree offset flange in use, what's the general method to piece the run together? Do you generally start from one side and build out? Do you try to keep things 90 or 45 degrees for simplicity? Should I mount that flange to the floor first and work from there? I just seem to have such a hard time guesstimating with the dry fit.

2) Note the location of the proposed vent (where the towel is sticking out of the wye) - is that a good approach?

Thanks!
 

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bens

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This is just a suggestion. cut the stack where I drew a line and trash that crooked flange. Screw a new closet flange to the floor. Select a closet bend, dry fit it to the closet flange and figure what you need from there.

It's good advice...I'm not sure that the closet bend will have clearance to sit inside of that notch in the joist - that's existing and I don't want to make it worse. But it's worth a try.
 

Tughillrzr

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It's good advice...I'm not sure that the closet bend will have clearance to sit inside of that notch in the joist - that's existing and I don't want to make it worse. But it's worth a try.
You try an offset flange and down the other side of joist?
 

Reach4

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I don't know what that piece below your blue arrow is. If that is the same OD as a pipe, I might cut there. And then use shielded coupler to hook up new stuff. Don't keep gluing stuff that you may not get right the first or second time. The couplings will give you freedom to adjust

Your other alternative I think is to remove those two rub ber couplings, and build from scratch with a wye , and use shielded couplings this time. Again, the couplings let you adjust.
 

bens

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I don't know what that piece below your blue arrow is. If that is the same OD as a pipe, I might cut there. And then use shielded coupler to hook up new stuff. Don't keep gluing stuff that you may not get right the first or second time. The couplings will give you freedom to adjust

Your other alternative I think is to remove those two rub ber couplings, and build from scratch with a wye , and use shielded couplings this time. Again, the couplings let you adjust.

Right, but the shielded ones have less play - makes it harder to fudge it a little.
Is shielded required for above ground?
 

wwhitney

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Yes, unshielded only for below grade.

How about 45 flange to the left, go vertical once clear of the iron pipe below, then 45 straight into a wye on the stack, replace everything between rubber couplings, and sister the joist for the awful notch?

Cheers, Wayne
 

bens

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Yeh, I had that thought I think it's what I'll try next.
1) Why a wye into the stack? Is the sanitary tee not supposed to be used in that position?
2) Note the line still needs a vent. Does it matter where it is located?
 

Reach4

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1) Why a wye into the stack? Is the sanitary tee not supposed to be used in that position?
Sanitary tee is ok, but should be fed by a long sweep rather than a medium. Wye seems to be roughly aiming to where you want to connect to.
2) Note the line still needs a vent. Does it matter where it is located?
Does non-bathroom waste come down that big pipe? Or waste from a floor higher than the one of the toilet?
 

bens

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Yes, waste from a floor higher than the toilet comes down that pipe.
I have a nice 2" vent to connect to in the background which is existing, just have to know where acceptable places to attach are.
 

Reach4

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Yes, waste from a floor higher than the toilet comes down that pipe.
I have a nice 2" vent to connect to in the background which is existing, just have to know where acceptable places to attach are.
What plumbing code?
 

wwhitney

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WC vent takeoff elevation is not restricted. The vent itself just has to rise vertically (up to 45 degrees off plumb) until 6" above the WC flood rim. So you could stick a 3x2 wye on the WC fixture drain just ahead of the wye going into the stack, with the branch rotated towards your vent stub-out in the back (and still no more that 45 degrees off plumb). Getting the vent alignment and angles to meet up will be fiddly, just like with the drain.

I'm curious, your photos just show a new WC being cut into an existing stack--does the room have other fixtures, and how does their DWV run?

Cheers, Wayne
 

bens

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I'm curious, your photos just show a new WC being cut into an existing stack--does the room have other fixtures, and how does their DWV run?

There is only a sink with it's own vent going up to the next level and it empties into that same 4" stack.
 

Jeff H Young

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Bens, You got some good suggestions . I think I'd avoid going through the notch as well leaving the one side of joist access to repair joist if you choose or feel need. notch looks 5 or 6 decades old house still standing but not the greatest structural modification.
I like screwing flange down in this case
 

bens

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Well, fail #2. I don't shy away from failing a project once but I don't think I have ever failed twice in a row. Disappointing!
I tried to set it up like the pic below but wound up with a 45 degree straight run which was off by more than 3/4 inch. So I tried to cut it by the flange to have another go and wound up cracking the flange since it was already screwed tightly to the floor.

For the fail: (pic1)
1) Is there someway I can estimate these lengths of pipe better? Just seems like that last piece always gets me and I'm not working with a long run here - little mistakes makes the whole thing fail.
2) I'm not sure how I picked up those 45 schedule 40 bends...I'm thinking they are only for pressure?

For the idea: (second pic)
1) Should I try this layout instead?
2) Is sweep elbow necessary here?
3) The problem with adding multiple ferncos to allow to iteratively adjusting the lengths is that I may wind up with lengths which are too long anyway trying to insert ferncos like this. There is so little straight pipe length to work with here.

Thanks for all of the advice. Believe it or not I have completed many significant DIY projects over the past 20 years and have read many books and the internet on these things. This project is really kicking my butt.
 

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