Done with Amtrol - How is Flexcon?

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Cwilliams2000

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After getting amtrol tanks for 30+ years I am done. The last order took 4 tanks before getting a dent free unit. all due to inadequate packaging. Now here is the tank, leaking and looking terrible after 11 months! Rusted out threads, bottom of the tank already showing rust through and leaking at the factory fitting, which should be welded on, not threaded with no protection. You can see the sweating on my tee, but if you look you can also see the rust stain underneath, showing the drip is coming from the rusted out thread area.

Does anyone on here use Flexcon tanks, either they pro with a stainless sitting or their fiberglass/pvc tanks? This seems like a much better design, and at this point I don't care about the price. I can't go through swapping these out every year.

11 months! Amtrol agreed to replace the tank, of course I lose the $300 of fittings and 2 hours to do it, needs to have some cut out due to the location, but I don't want to reuse fittings on a brand new install, thats why I replaced them all the fist time. I couldn't be more pissed about this. Sad part is I replaced a 30 year amtrol too
 

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Reach4

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Flexcon does not want to sell to DIYers. Flexcon would be a nice tank, but you will probably need to get it installed by a professional. My tank is a Flexcon Challenger, which is a steel tank. I never looked at the underside.



What model tank is that? Well-X-Trol is Amtrol's more premium tank vs Water Worker, Champion, Wel-Flo, Value-well.
 

Cwilliams2000

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At this point I may have someone else do it I can't be worrying about the bottom of tanks rusting out. It figures too this was othe one time I didn't do a well tee with a union, since its never been helpful in the past. I guess if I stick with Amtrol I need to plan to replace it often. The Amtrol was Well-X-Trol
 

Valveman

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Sorry for your problem. Seems anytime a company is sold to someone new, problems seem to appear. Rusting from the outside is not the normal failure mode for a pressure tank. Normally the diaphragm fails from going up and down so many times as the pump cycles on and off. But no matter what the problem with the tank a Cycle Stop Valve can be the answer. The Cycle Stop Valve stops the cycling that destroys pumps, tank diaphragms, and everything else in the system. The CSV also allows the use of a much smaller tank. These little 4.5 or 10 gallon size tanks can easily be coated with Flex seal or something sprayed on that would eliminate any rusting from the outside. Then if the tank did rust out anyway, screwing off a little tank like that is easy and quick to do, not to mention way less expensive than those huge tanks that are not lasting. Plus, you will really like the strong constant pressure from the CSV compared to the 40 to 60 pressure swings you have now.

PK1A submersible well seal.jpg

 

Fitter30

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Why would you have to replace brass, stainless or galvanized fittings? Pipe the new tank in with a shutoff and drain valves and a union. Then it would be easy for service or replacement.
 
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Cwilliams2000

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You're right this was the first I didn't have a union for, sometimes they leak after time and I didn't really think the tank was a risky item. Amtrol confirmed that the threads on the tank are just unpainted steel, so I have no idea how thats supposed to be good for longevity since it will help rust form and spread under the paint which is exactly what happened. I think once Worthington bought these guys they just value engineered it to death which sucks on something you want to last 15 years. The bladder inside is probably from a birthday ballon now and will probably blow in 3 years.
 

Cwilliams2000

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The elbow is stainless and the tank threaded connection is steel, idiotic design. But so is their warranty that says they aren't responsible for any damage, even when it's a product failure. Wouldn't that be great if car companies could put that line and think they are exempt from being sued. It's honestly a sneeze line to put in there, just to scare people off. If this tank burst after 11 months at a rusted out factory connection and they thin they wont be responsible for damage for a line printed in a warranty that you didn't agree to, they are nuts.
 

Reach4

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You could hit the steel by the elbow with some primer before installing. I am not saying that you should have to do that.

When you get the new one, is the elbow magnetic? Is the nipple between the tank and the elbow magnetic? In the old one, it would be, but while you have the magnet there, maybe check.
 

Valveman

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You're right this was the first I didn't have a union for, sometimes they leak after time and I didn't really think the tank was a risky item. Amtrol confirmed that the threads on the tank are just unpainted steel, so I have no idea how thats supposed to be good for longevity since it will help rust form and spread under the paint which is exactly what happened. I think once Worthington bought these guys they just value engineered it to death which sucks on something you want to last 15 years. The bladder inside is probably from a birthday ballon now and will probably blow in 3 years.

All the more reasons to use a Cycle Stop Valve to eliminate cycling and be able to rely much less on the pressure tank. I maybe able to take credit or fault for some of these changes in the water pump industry. I have had my dealings with Amtrol and other tank companies since starting Cycle Stop Valves in 1993. BTW Flexcon is just a copy of an Amtrol, as everything they have is a copy of something a patent has run out on. Flexcon now makes an in the well pressure tank, which I patented at the same time as the CSV. The in well tank and Amtrol selling out may have been from finally seeing the writing on the wall about Cycle Stop Valves. I told both companies back in the 90's they would need to start making bicycle seats or something as the big pressure tank was going to be obsolete because of the CSV. I didn't think it would take this long for people to start realizing big pressure tanks are not the way to go anymore. But once people incorrectly get it in their head that water comes from the tank, it is hard to make them see the truth. Most pump guys are now pushing those VFD pump systems. They want a way to make a lot of money instead of using a CSV that doesn't cost much and last forever. Neither the CSV or the VFD use much of a pressure tank. So, they really may need to start making bicycle seats or something else, it has just taken some time to have that effect.
 

Fitter30

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The elbow is stainless and the tank threaded connection is steel, idiotic design. But so is their warranty that says they aren't responsible for any damage, even when it's a product failure. Wouldn't that be great if car companies could put that line and think they are exempt from being sued. It's honestly a sneeze line to put in there, just to scare people off. If this tank burst after 11 months at a rusted out factory connection and they thin they wont be responsible for damage for a line printed in a warranty that you didn't agree to, they are nuts.
Stainless has a tendency to leak if the proper thread sealant isn't used. They make nickel teflon tape made for it. Also when tightening because of the stainless the threads heat up need to tighten in a certain way So when it's tighten when it getting tight stop for 30 seconds do this for two or three times.
 
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