Diagnosing faulty pump, pressure switch or failing well

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Willowanders

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Hello folks. Thank you kindly for reading. So here is my woes.
We moved to norther British Columbia in May of this year. Our well is 90 ft. We had no water issues on arrival other than a minute or so for pressure tank to kick in. Pressure switch was a 20/40 and we wanted to upgrade to 40/60. Plumber came by and said our tank was in good shape and it was a small job to increase pressure. We had plumber do the job following week. When they were installing new switch they incorrectly wired it twice and shorted the switch and flipped my breaker, the third try they bypassed the pressure switch. I know nothing about this and trusted them. Our water poured out black sludge for a day or two, then went clear but has a film now. We did some canning and jars were covered in a light yellow dust/film. It has been 2 week and I have approx 2psi when we use water now. It was fine before we had any work done so I am very frustrated. We contacted same plumber last week and demanded they check their work and see what is going on. We are very stressed as we have 35 chickens, dogs, cats and a huge garden that need water. The plumber today checked the switch says gauge and switch are working, checked the well, and says the well level was low sitting at approx 12-14 feet in this 90 foot well. He said to turn our well pump off to let it refill, and turn it on tomorrow to gauge pressure, if not replace pump or the well is failing. Does anyone have any experience, words of wisdom or idea what the heck's going on. I wish we had never touched the pressure switch as it was working good enough two weeks ago and now our lives are turned upside down.
 

Reach4

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Are you saying that your symptom is sediment or other crud in the water? In that case, run water into the ditch until the well goes dry or the sediment clears up.

Did he pull the pump? If not, I don't know what would have kicked up sediment.
I have not heard of that yellow dust.
 

Bannerman

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the third try they bypassed the pressure switch.
Is your well water system equipped with a pressure relief valve? If so, did the relief valve discharge to relieve excess water pressure due to the pump not shutting off while the pressure switch was bypassed?

How long was the pump running continuously while there was no water being used? No water flow to faucets or other fixtures, or being released through a pressure relief valve would result in the pump being 'deadheaded' which would soon cause it to overheat since there was no water flowing over the electric motor to cool the motor.

Our water poured out black sludge for a day or two, then went clear but has a film now.
Perhaps the pump running while deadheaded has damaged it? While most pumps utilize a layer of water to lubricate the bearings, some are equipped with bearings that are lubricated with oil and so oil may have leaked out which may be the cause of the initial sludge and ongoing film.
 
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Willowanders

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Are you saying that your symptom is sediment or other crud in the water? In that case, run water into the ditch until the well goes dry or the sediment clears up.

Did he pull the pump? If not, I don't know what would have kicked up sediment.
I have not heard of that yellow dust.
Problem is no pressure and crud. Both of which were fine before having this work done.
 

Willowanders

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Is your well water system equipped with a pressure relief valve? If so, did the relief valve discharge to relieve excess water pressure due to the pump not shutting off while the pressure switch was bypassed?

How long was the pump running continuously while there was no water being used? No water flow to faucets or other fixtures, or being released through a pressure relief valve would result in the pump being 'deadheaded' which would soon cause it to overheat since there was no water flowing over the electric motor to cool the motor.


Perhaps the pump running while deadheaded has damaged it? While most pumps utilize a layer of water to lubricate the bearings, some are equipped with bearings that are lubricated with oil and so oil may have leaked out which may be the cause of the initial sludge and ongoing film.
I will checktose if it has a pressure release valve. the pump was only running for a few days while we tried to use water but only has 2 psi, there was just a trickle coming out.
 

Willowanders

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We followed instruction to turn of pump and let well refill for 24 hours and this morning we have still no pressure but no sediment.
 

Fitter30

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That crud could have stopped up the inlet. Clamp on amp meter with a volt meter could check voltage and amp draw of pump. If pressure switch was wired wrong it would of been a direct short across the contacts and possibly burnt the contacts visually can be seen with them closed but opening them with power off and a screwdriver. Homeowner at least needs a non contact voltage tester to check if a circuit is hot.
 

Valveman

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Then you have a hole in the drop pipe and your well is not out of water. Most likely the pump got hot when the pressure switch was bypassed and melted the pipe right above the pump.
 

2stupid2fixit

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you have a shetload of ground animals on the surface, and percolation happens. maybe your well yields third world country water?
if your well is 90 feet deep but only 12 to 14 feet of the well has water... thats gonna be mud, right?
 

Valveman

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Not uncommon to only have 10-15 feet of water in a well. shouldn't be muddy either unless there is a hole in the pipe shooting sideways at the screen or side of the hole.
 
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