Pressure switch/well issue

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Khellandros

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Hello

I looked through the forum and tried to find someone with the same issue so I wouldn't have to make a new thread but couldn't find one.

I have a 1hp single phase above ground pump for a shallow well, it feeds a 55gallon holding tank that has 38psi in the bladder when measured with no water in it.
The other day my water ran out, i pushed the back of the contacts on the switch and it closed and pressured the tank then opened back up just fine. But when the water would get low it wouldn't reliably activate, it would click closed then immediately open back up and not try closing again. This switch had been working fine for about 4 years.

I got a new switch but it was a 30/50 and I needed a 40/60 so when I installed it I had basically the same issue, it worked for a couple days then would close and open back up. After some research I realized I need a 40/60 so I turned the big screw to try and crank it up to a 40/60, that worked for a day or two then it started acting up the same way. When installing that switch I thought I may have over tightened the pressure connection so I decided I broke the switch and I wanted a proper sized one anyway so I bought a 40/60. Installed it today and the problem changed but i'm still have an issue.

Now when the pressure gets low the switch closes but it doesn't actually connect. If I look at the contacts they appear closed but if I measure voltage on either side I only have power on the "Hot" side. If I bump the lever it immediately activates, pressurizes then kicks out like it should. Also the lever is floppy, I don't know if that's cause it's pressurized or if there's just something screwed up with it. Pump makes no weird noises, my breaker never pops and it never shuts off before it should.

Am I missing something obvious or did I get a bad switch out of the box?
 

Valveman

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The tank is probably waterlogged. All pressure switches are the same. Buy whatever pressure is available and adjust the large screw until it works at the pressure you want. The switches with the lever on the side are for low pressure protection and will shut off because the tank is waterlogged. When the pressure is low they will not let power to the motor until you lift that lever.

As usual, all these problems, including the bad tank, are caused by the pump cycling on and off too much.

 

Khellandros

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The tank is probably waterlogged. All pressure switches are the same. Buy whatever pressure is available and adjust the large screw until it works at the pressure you want. The switches with the lever on the side are for low pressure protection and will shut off because the tank is waterlogged. When the pressure is low they will not let power to the motor until you lift that lever.

As usual, all these problems, including the bad tank, are caused by the pump cycling on and off too much.


Thanks for the reply. The tank was replaced 4 years ago, I used to have the old style with no bladder so I didn't really consider it as a possibility when this started happening. When I get home I'll drain the system and shake the tank to see if I can hear sloshing inside.

Also I definitely don't have a cycle stop valve in my system but it sounds like I should look into it.

Would that also cause me to get air in my water? I've noticed recently when running my hose to give the animals water it seems very bubbly and full of air which it never used to.
 

Reach4

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Usually it is better to have a pressure switch without the lever.

Note that with a jet pump, you need to set the air precharge lower than you would with a submersible. Start at 5 psi below the cut-in pressure. The pressure tank has to continue to supply the water between when the switch activates (closes) and when the pump is able to deliver the water needed. Jet pumps take longer to get the water pumping at a normal rate.

If you did not have the low pressure cutoff feature, there would just be a stutter in pressure as the jet pump got going.
 

Khellandros

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Usually it is better to have a pressure switch without the lever.

Note that with a jet pump, you need to set the air precharge lower than you would with a submersible. Start at 5 psi below the cut-in pressure. The pressure tank has to continue to supply the water between when the switch activates (closes) and when the pump is able to deliver the water needed. Jet pumps take longer to get the water pumping at a normal rate.

If you did not have the low pressure cutoff feature, there would just be a stutter in pressure as the jet pump got going.
My original switch that I thought failed did not have the lever but when buying the new one(s) the models with the lever were more expensive so of course I thought that meant higher quality lol. I may switch back to the non lever style after checking if the tank is waterlogged or not. Thanks for the reply
 

Khellandros

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****UPDATE****

So I put a switch with no lever on instead of one with the lever. I checked the tank once it was drained and could not hear sloshing so if it's waterlogged I'm guessing it's not by much. Also when I checked the pressure last night then again this morning there was no movement and I'm assuming if the water bladder was leaking i'd see the pressure drain off slowly over time.

After putting the new switch on I was still having issues and discovered I have 2 pressure switches. One is used as a voltage cut off to the pumps switch. It's contacts were very worn, very burnt and it wasn't changed when I did the new tank years back. It was also rated for 20/40 and going by the large screw had been cranked way up to match the old switch on the pump.

I bypassed it for now and everything seems to be working fine, i'll put a new one on tomorrow but so far I think my problem is resolved. Thank you again for everyone who tried to help.
 

LLigetfa

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The floppy lever could be a sign of a loose or damaged component.
Floppy lever is normal. What is not normal is to have two pressure switches controlling the same pump. My guess is one is installed on the side of the motor which the manufacturers do as a convenience to make an easy-to-install complete package. It is not a good location for it so that is the one to bypass/eliminate.
 

Valveman

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Like was said, there should only be one pressure switch. Listening for "sloshing" won't do it. Check the air pressure in the tank after the pump is off and all water drained from the tank.
 
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