Creating a PEX-A Manifold for Home Water Line

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WorldPeace

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I am looking to set up a PEX-A manifold with valves for my home water line.

The Viega Manabloc looks nice but that's PEX-B. Apollo came out with a manifold with brass ball valves; however, reviews of them aren't favorable. People have complained about cheap construction and leaks.

Any recommendations of what I should do instead?

I was thinking of simply custom-making my own manifold by putting together different-sized Apollo plastic manifolds (pictured here) and attaching valves to the ports. I would try to make it look like this but instead of copper, it would be in plastic.

I would incorporate a loop on the cold water line to ensure equal water pressure to all fixtures.

Good idea?
 

John Gayewski

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I am looking to set up a PEX-A manifold with valves for my home water line.

The Viega Manabloc looks nice but that's PEX-B. Apollo came out with a manifold with brass ball valves; however, reviews of them aren't favorable. People have complained about cheap construction and leaks.

Any recommendations of what I should do instead?

I would incorporate a loop on the cold water line to ensure equal water pressure to all fixtures.

Good idea?
Good idea? I wouldn't call it that. It's an idea. You wind up with a lot of pipe that usually isn't needed and it usually looks kind of sloppy.

Why not a copper manifold with plastic piping?

Generally the reason to do this is because you don't know how to size pipe.
 

WorthFlorida

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John has the right recommendation, go with a copper manifold. Rigging your own will be a mess with too many connections with each a possible source of a future leak occurring. Using separately installed ball valves is better. Should a valve fail, it's an easy replacement.
 

Reach4

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Generally the reason to do this is because you don't know how to size pipe.
You think that is why people use manifolds. How about home runs for hots. How about neatness. How about valves all together.

water-sizing-chart-terrylove-40-60.jpg
 
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John Gayewski

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You think that is why people use manifolds. How about home runs for hots. How about neatness. How about valves all together.
I don't think there is anything neat about running six independent water lines to a bathroom. Yes when you don't know how to do something you do more work to make up for it.
 

Reach4

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I don't think there is anything neat about running six independent water lines to a bathroom. Yes when you don't know how to do something you do more work to make up for it.
Some people have a different sense of symmetry I can see an advantage of having shut off valves clustered. I can see an advantage to home run 3/8 or 1/2 to a lavatory vs carrying that water in 3/4. But yes, branch style has the advantage of fewer hangers/holes.

I am attracted to using home run for hot and branch for cold. I don't have that need for symmetry.
 

John Gayewski

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The demand on a hot water line is usually pretty low. A circulating 3/4 line is pretty common even for commerical buildings with three bathrooms (and two showers). You'd get hot water in a much better way doing that rather than homeruns.
 

Jeff H Young

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Ive got Pex in attic for 21 years . with manifolds I cant even get near them dont even know what they look like plastic copper or with valves (assuming not) I shut house water off for repairs I got anglestops at sinks and toilets, just like it was copper or gal the valved manifolds look slick but and I like the concept but does a valve or 25 of them all last longer than a plain manifold?
So if you have a manifold with valves I guess anglestops are redundant and just more chances for failure
 

WorldPeace

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I agree it wouldn't look as pretty as a pre-built manifold with valves but besides the Apollo, it doesn't appear they sell a Pex-A manifold with valves. I would love to just get the Apollo and save me the headache but the build quality looks too cheap. If you know of a brand that sells a Pex-A manifold with valves, I'm all for it. :)

When you suggested using copper instead of the plastic manifold, you mean just the main manifold without the valves, right? Wouldn't that be just as sloppy since you're just replacing the main manifold from plastic to copper? I would still have to connect all the valves separately.

In terms of reliability, I guess you're right. Copper would be better but the plastic manifolds come in more variety and people have said they are solid and reliable.

I wish a company would sell something pre-built but this appears to be the only choice right now.


Good idea? I wouldn't call it that. It's an idea. You wind up with a lot of pipe that usually isn't needed and it usually looks kind of sloppy.

Why not a copper manifold with plastic piping?

Generally the reason to do this is because you don't know how to size pipe.
 

WorldPeace

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Hey, Florida,

I don't know if you and John are thinking I'm going to do this.
7zxwv7uep7b21.jpg


I agree. That would be crazy. Too many connections that are prone to leaks.

I meant the below except sweating copper, the connections would be Pex barb.
uponor-manifold-extra-lines (1).jpg




John has the right recommendation, go with a copper manifold. Rigging your own will be a mess with too many connections with each a possible source of a future leak occurring. Using separately installed ball valves is better. Should a valve fail, it's an easy replacement.
 

WorldPeace

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Thanks for the links! You always provide solid info.

The Uponor is custom-made so I'm assuming that it's going to cost $$. But, the Sioux Chief looks like it's exactly what I need. Hopefully, they have the port configuration I need.


 

WorldPeace

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A lot of people do seem to prefer the EP.

I was also going to create a small loop like in the picture I provided above so all the branches get equal water pressure. Since my home is small, it's probably overkill but it does look nice, doesn't it?

 

James23912

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I am no plumber but in my new house I used a Sioux Chief copper set up with pex, no problems so far, makes it much easier for a do it yourselfer
 

John Gayewski

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Its called the octopus when people do it with duct work.

And the bomb when people do it with gas. " Just give me 2 pounds at the service I'll buy a bunch of regulators"

Lol
 
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