Another Messed Up Flange

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by DiYGuy2021, Feb 12, 2021.

  1. DiYGuy2021

    DiYGuy2021 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2021
    Location:
    Midwest
    Hello. Thanks for all of your help on my last issue.

    I have another toilet I'm installing in my house. It appears the toilet flange has nothing to mount to, since the subfloor is rotted. I understand I can get a repair ring that has extension arms to secure it through flooring 1/2 or a 1 inch away from the flange.

    However...even if I do this, I'm concerned about two other things.

    The first one is the area with the red lines in the picture. I notice tiny little holes in whatever was used to seal those 2 parts together.

    The other area I'm concerned with is the circled portion in the picture. What are the chances that is leaking or will leak on the future, due to the joint not being tight?

    Thanks!

    20210212_135445.jpg
     
  2. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    Try a sharper picture.

    Don't get destructive through impatience. I suspect that the black plastic around the wax may have been part of the wax ring product. See if that lifts off.

    There are various repair rings that give you something to hold your closet bolts down with. Which you use depends on your situation.
     
  3. Sponsor

    Sponsor Paid Advertisement

     
  4. DiYGuy2021

    DiYGuy2021 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2021
    Location:
    Midwest
    20210212_142946.jpg

    This is where it appears 2 pieces of ABS are joined, but appear to be separating. It didnt help when I drilled the metal portion of the toilet flange, the drill bit caught, and it started to pull on the pipes below. My question about that part is...is it most likely leaking, or will it most likely be in the future because of that?

    Also, the black plastic portion on the inside diameter of the metal flange appears to be glued to the pipe. It moves independent of the metal, but when it is moved, the pipe moves with it.
     
  5. DiYGuy2021

    DiYGuy2021 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2021
    Location:
    Midwest
    I could really use some advice on this issue. I'm wondering if I need to go to the floor beneath, cut through the ceiling, and replace that part of the pipe.
     
  6. Jeff H Young

    Jeff H Young In the Trades

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2020
    Location:
    92346
    no problem thats just glue its not falling apart looks solid
     
    Tuttles Revenge likes this.
  7. DiYGuy2021

    DiYGuy2021 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2021
    Location:
    Midwest
    I guess what worries me was that the gap wasnt as big before I drilled into the metal flange, and it yanked the flange up and increased the gap between the pipes. So you think it still wouldn't leak?
     
  8. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    Are you going to address the rotted subfloor, or do you think that is limited to the area under the metal ring?
     
  9. Michael Young

    Michael Young Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2016
    Location:
    North Carolina
    obviously, REPLACE THE freakin’ FLOOR!

    But I get it if you don't want to do all that right now. So if you're just looking for a way to make the toilet solid.... take some long screws. You up top, someone down below. Zip the screw in until the guy sees the tip of the screws. take small pieces of 2x4 (pref. treated). have your helper push the 2x4 snug against the screw. Now zip the screw into that piece of 2x4. Will likely take three small cuts of 2x4. Zip in screws to 2x4 and make is snug.

    Now re-set your toilet. be sure to use a space if you need one. Bam! toilet won't rock and you dont have to replace the whole floor. Ugly but it will work
     
    Jeff H Young likes this.
  10. Jeff H Young

    Jeff H Young In the Trades

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2020
    Location:
    92346
    That's how I do closet rings even on a good floor long screws into wood not just 3/4 inch drywall screws but 2 1/2 brass screws. a lot of times we rough in before the floors are sheeted and carpenters holes around the pipe kind of sloppy so the solid blocking helps
     
  11. DiYGuy2021

    DiYGuy2021 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2021
    Location:
    Midwest
    Thanks for all the replies. My plan is to fix the subfloor in the future when I replace the flooring. However, why does it really matter if the subfloor is rotted where the flange is, if you can compensate by going underneath on the floor beneath the flange?

    Would it be too much trouble to replace the ABS pipe that connects to the curved pipe inside the toilet flange?
     
  12. DiYGuy2021

    DiYGuy2021 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2021
    Location:
    Midwest
    Update!

    I know it has been a little bit...

    I ended up replacing a length of ABS under tbe floor by cutting the ceiling below. I zipped some pressure treated wood that I scribed to fit around the elbow, underneath the floor that is connected to the flange, so i could put those long screws in. I connected an ABS toilet flange to the ABS elbow.

    I have one concern, though. When I connected a new piece of ABS straight pipe with a coupling to the existing ABS to replace it, I think the pipe might have been about 1/4 of an inch from bottoming out, and I might not have gotten a full 1/4 turn on it. Do you think that will be an issue?

    Also, the old flange consisted of an ABS elbow with a lip on it, and an outer, rusted metal ring. What the heck?


    Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2021
  13. Michael Young

    Michael Young Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2016
    Location:
    North Carolina
    You can set a toilet onto a rotted floor. But the floor will flex every time someone sits down. This constant movement will cause your bolts and seals to fail. If the toilet were to develop a crack and a 200-lbs person sat on that toilet, if the crack were to give under the weight, that 200-lb person would crash downwards and fall directly on top of extremely sharp shards of porcelain. Bare-assed into shards of cracked porcelain. If you don't bleed out and die, you'll definitely be making a trip to the emergency room. Rotted floor = Safety Hazard. Most plumbers won't knowingly set a toilet, water heater, shower base, etc. onto a rotted floor. It really isn't about liability. we genuinely don't want you to get hurt.
     
  14. Jeff H Young

    Jeff H Young In the Trades

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2020
    Location:
    92346
    a little ragged around the flange is one thing , a rotted out floor is another. DIY guy2021 hope your able to determine the integrity of the floor. To me its obvious when a structure is so horribly damaged to cause harm.
     
Similar Threads: Another Messed
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Another Bathroom Wet Vent Tuesday at 12:25 PM
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Yet another Utility Sink / Washing Machine question Apr 19, 2021
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Another venting question Apr 13, 2021
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Another kitchen sink vent question -vent size Apr 3, 2021
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Should I add another vent? Mar 22, 2021

Share This Page